College of Law

Coats Hall

Andrew M. Coats Hall
300 Timberdell Road
Norman, OK 73019-5081
Phone: (405) 325-4699
FAX: (405) 325-0502
lawcommunications@ou.edu
www.law.ou.edu

Administrative Officers of the College

Katheleen Guzman, Interim Dean
Steven S. Gensler, Associate Dean of Academics
Gail E. Mullins, Co-Associate Dean of Academics and Assistant Dean of Experiential Learning
Megan Wischmeier Shaner, Associate Dean for Research and Scholarship
Laura Palk, Assistant Dean of Development and Alumni Affairs
Joel Wegemer, Interim Director of the Law Library

General Information

The College of Law was established in 1909. In 1911 the College of Law joined the Association of American Law Schools. Since 1923 the College of Law has been accredited by the American Bar Association’s Section on Legal Education. The College of Law is the only public law school in Oklahoma.

In 1971, the University of Oklahoma Law Center was formed. The Law Center comprises the College of Law, Law Library and the Legal Assistant Education program. The center was established to encourage and facilitate development of programs beyond the normal law school scope. The role of the Law Center is more than training lawyers. It provides a number of professional activities to serve the Bar and the citizens of the state of Oklahoma. These include continuing legal education for lawyers, training of legal assistants, publishing books on Oklahoma law, organized legal research, public service projects, and legal aid services for the needy. It is home to the Donald E. Pray Library.

The Law Center building, now named Andrew M. Coats Hall, was completely renovated in 2002, adding 80,000 square feet to the facilities. The expansion included a new law library with large reading room, high-speed modernized computer labs, private study rooms, and a 250-seat high-tech courtroom. OU Law students now are able to watch live trials and appeals hearings as state and federal courts bring the real world into the Law Center.

Programs Offered

Programs & Facilities

Donald E. Pray Law Library

The Law Library's mission is to support the scholarly and instructional activities of the Law Center's faculty and students and to serve the research and informational needs of the University, the legal community, and the public. The Law Library strives to provide our patrons with access to a rich collection of research materials in both print and electronic formats.

OU Legal Clinic

Through the OU College of Law Civil Clinic and Criminal Defense Clinic, students represent clients from Cleveland and McClain counties who would not otherwise be able to afford counsel. Operating under the close supervision of faculty attorneys, student interns face the same situations and practice demands they will encounter as attorneys while being directly responsible for representation of clients as licensed legal interns

Legal Assistant Education Program

OU Law’s ABA-approved legal assistant/paralegal education certificate prepares students to work with lawyers in public and private law practice, in the judiciary, corporations, and government. 

Oklahoma Law Review

The Oklahoma Law Review is published quarterly by University of Oklahoma College of Law to serve the profession and the public with timely discussions of state and federal legal issues.

American Indian Law Review

The American Indian Law Review was launched by a group of OU Law students in 1973 to provide a scholarly forum for the study of legal issues relevant to Native Americans and indigenous peoples around the world.

Oil and Gas, Natural Resources, and Energy Journal (ONE J)

ONE J: Oil and Gas, Natural Resources, and Energy Journal is a peer-reviewed publication, the first of its kind in the nation. Its student editors publish domestic and international legal scholarship on oil, gas, energy, and natural resources law, for the benefit of a worldwide readership that accesses ONE J content via various online platforms.

Center for International Business and Human Rights

The International Business and Human Rights Center has a two-fold mission: (1) to provide OU Law students with academic training, networking, and practical experience in this emerging field that will equip them to be leaders in this space as well as train the greater legal community and others in IBHR issues, and (2) to provide academic think tank support on international business and human rights issues, with a particular focus on the energy/extractive sector and Information and Communications Technology (ICT) companies.

Center for Technology and Innovation in Practice

The Center for Technology and Innovation in Practice engages with academics, policymakers and industry experts to research and implement the use of technology in legal education and law practice.  The OU Law Center for Technology & Innovation in Practice exists to prepare law students for practice through technology training and innovative initiatives to move the practice of law forward. 

Center for the Study of American Indian Law and Policy

The Center for the Study of American Indian Law and Policy provides counsel to tribal, state and national policymakers and a forum for the interdisciplinary discussion and resolution of problems facing native communities.

Oil & Gas, Natural Resources and Energy Center

OU Law is a national and international leader in oil and gas, natural resources, and energy law – what we call ONE. Our expansive offerings are synthesized within our ONE Center, covering our academic degrees and certificates – J.D. certificates and an LL.M. in energy and natural resources, and an online M.L.S. in oil, gas, and energy law – and programming. Our ONE Center and OU Law host the annual Eugene Kuntz Conference on Natural Resources Law and Policy, the largest conference of its kind in the country, and are home to the Oil and Gas, Natural Resources, and Energy Journal (ONE J), the first journal of its kind. Students can also participate in the student association, ONE S – Oil and Gas, Natural Resources, and Energy Society. Thanks to our strategic partnerships throughout the industry, we are able to build upon our academic strength to provide unparalleled opportunities to our students.

Financial Aid and Scholarships

The College of Law has undertaken a major initiative in recent years to increase the amount of awards and scholarships.The college has a separate application for scholarships and awards. Students are encouraged to complete the scholarship questionnaire during the first two weeks of either the fall or spring semester of each year.

The College of Law also participates in the FAFSA program. Students applying for financial aid should file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Contact the Student Financial Center, 1000 Asp Avenue, 105 Buchanan Hall, Norman, OK 73019, (405) 325-9000, for more information.

Career Services

The College of Law provides career planning for students through its Career Development Office. The office is involved in a variety of activities to assist students seeking internships as well as those seeking permanent employment. These activities include career goal setting, networking and job search session, mock interviews, and hosting on-campus interviews.

Student Organizations

There are many student organizations at the College of Law. 

  • Student Bar Association and its Board of Governors
  • Law Student Division of the American Bar Association
  • Board of Advocates
  • Organization for Advancement of Women in Law
  • Oklahoma International Law Society
  • Environmental Law Student Association
  • Lawyers Against Human Trafficking
  • The Federalist Society
  • Health Law Student Association
  • Federal Bar Association
  • Business Law Society
  • Art & Cultural Heritage Law Association
  • OUtLaw
  • Oil & Gas, Natural Resources, and Energy Law Society
  • Intellectual Property Society

  • Agricultural Law Society
  • Christian Legal Society
  • Criminal Law Society
  • Military Law Society
  • Victim Advocacy Program
  • Volunteer Income Tax Assistance
  • Public Interest Law Student Association
  • Sports & Entertainment Law Society
  • American Constitutional Society
  • Native American Law Student Association
  • Black Law Student Association
  • Latinex Law Student Association

  • Asian Pacific American Law Student Association
  • Two legal fraternities are active — Phi Delta Phi and Phi Alpha Delta.

Programs Offered

Doctoral Degree

The College of Law offers the Juris Doctor degree, the first professional degree in law. Areas of concentration include American Indian and Indigenous Peoples Law; Business, Commercial, and Real Estate; Litigation; Oil and Gas, Natural Resources and Energy Law; Constitutional and Public Interest Law; Criminal Law and Procedure; Estate Planning; Family Law; General Practitioner; Health Care; Intellectual Property Law; International and Comparative Law; and Tax Law.

Dual Degrees

The OU College of Law offers flexible dual degree options for J.D. students wishing to concentrate their studies in a specific area of practice. Our dual degree program, offered in partnership with other schools and colleges across The University of Oklahoma, allows students to complete two advanced degrees in less time than if earned independently, typically in three to four years.

Dual Degrees Offered:

  • Juris Doctor and Master of Business administration (J.D./M.B.A)
  • Juris Doctor and Master of Public Health (J.D./M.P.H.)
  • Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in International Studies (J.D./MAIS)
  • Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in Native American Studies (J.D./N.A.S.)
  • Juris Doctor and Masters of Health Administration (J.D./MHA)
  • Build Your Own Dual Degree: Juris Doctor and Master's Degree

Masters

Post Doctorate Degree:  Master of Laws

The John. B. Turner LL.M. Program offers five Master of Laws degrees:

Master's Degrees:  Master of Legal Studies

The Master of Legal Studies in Healthcare Law is designed for non-lawyers whose careers demand an understanding of healthcare-related legal issues. It provides graduate level education for professionals who work in the administration of healthcare facilities or systems. Students receive a grounding in laws and regulations that frame, guide, and direct the provision of healthcare services. The program offers a competitive advantage to anyone in the healthcare industry who handles compliance, advocacy, negotiates contracts, deals with the Affordable Healthcare act, manages real estate transactions, or works closely with healthcare attorneys. The curriculum requires the study of laws regulating the delivery and quality of medical services, access to public and private means of payment for such services, and transactions and liability within the healthcare industry. 

The Master of Legal Studies in Indigenous Peoples Law is designed for non-lawyers whose careers demand an understanding of the complex rules of Federal Indian Law. It offers a strong foundation in Native American Law for anyone who deals with contracts, negotiations or any other issues that demand knowledge of Native American self-governance issues, policy, regulation or business practice.This program can be taken entirely online.

The Master of Legal Studies in International Business Law provides graduate level education for business professionals relating to the legal and regulatory environment of international business law. Students will receive a grounding in laws and regulations that frame, guide, and direct international finance, sales, and disputes.

The Master of Legal Studies in Energy and Natural Resources Law recognizes a need for an online graduate program to serve the professionals in the energy industry who do not wish to seek a Juris Doctor degree at this point in their career. It is specifically designed for non-lawyers whose careers demand an understanding of energy-related legal issues. The degree program offers a competitive advantage to anyone in the energy industry who negotiates oil and gas contracts, deals with mineral rights or real estate transactions, or works closely with energy attorneys. This program offers an accelerated program that can be taken primarily online.

Graduate Certificates

The OU College of Law also offers the following graduate certificates:

  • The American Indian Law Graduate Certificate allows J.D. students to enrich their knowledge of American Indian Law through coursework including indigenous peoples’ culture, tribal courts, federal water law, and more. This certificate also includes experiential learning opportunities including an externship and work with OU Law’s journal American Indian Law Review.
  • The Business and Transactional Law Graduate Certificate is suited for J.D. students who wish to enter a transactional and business counseling practice. Required and elective business law classes are the backbone of this program, which also includes training in business drafting and writing.  Interdisciplinary options include business coursework from the OU Price College of Business
  • The Energy and Natural Resources Law Graduate Certificate will allow on campus LL.M. students to concentrate their studies in Energy and Natural Resources Law, choosing from the broad curriculum offered by the College of Law in this area.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Indigenous Peoples Law furthers on campus LL.M. students' study of Native American and other Indigenous Peoples Law, choosing from the broad curriculum offered by the College of Law in this area.
  • The International Law Certificate furthers J.D. students' knowledge of key international law issues. This certificate includes international interdisciplinary as well as externship opportunities.
  • The Litigation Graduate Certificate provides J.D. students with a firm foundation in the law that governs litigation and alternative dispute resolution. In addition to law coursework, students will take part in experiential learning, gain professional skills, and hone their public speaking and writing skills.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Oil & Gas, Natural Resources, and Energy Law furthers J.D. students' knowledge of legal issues unique to the energy industry. Students learn more about oil and gas production—from well drilling to delivery systems—and also about wind and water law, conservation, mineral titles, international petroleum transactions, real estate, and more. Interdisciplinary options include energy management coursework from the OU Price College of Business or a geology class from the Mewbourne College of Earth and Energy.

Admission

Admission Process

Regular Admission

First year students are admitted only in the fall. Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree prior to matriculation in the College of Law. Application forms may be obtained online.

All applicants must take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), or other graduate school admission test of suitable rigor. The LSAT is administered by the Educational Testing Service and available by writing for an application and information from: LSAT, Box 2000, Newtown, PA 18940, or via their website. Applicants must take the test no later than June of the year in which admission to the College of Law is sought and should indicate on the LSAT application form that their scores be reported to the University of Oklahoma College of Law.

All applicants must also register with the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS).

Each applicant must pay a non-refundable application fee.

Applicants are considered individually by the Admissions Committee, composed of three members of the law faculty. Selections are made from the most qualified, with approximately equal weight given to the LSAT score and the undergraduate grade point average. Admission is competitive as applications far outnumber available seats in the first-year class.

The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education limit the number of nonresidents to 15 percent of the student body and precludes the admission of a nonresident whose qualifications are lower than those of a resident denied admission.

LSAT scores more than five years old will not be considered. When an applicant takes the LSAT more than once, we accept the highest score. Other factors, such as undergraduate major, improvement in the undergraduate GPA during the last years of study, grade inflation, working while in undergraduate school, and/or graduate work may be considered in reviewing an applicant’s academic record.

Two letters of recommendation are required. Additionally, the Admissions Committee likes to conduct personal interviews with each applicant.

Applicants to whom admission is offered will be required to pay a $425 ($350 for MLS)  non-refundable deposit, which will be applied toward the first semester’s tuition. If the applicant does not enroll in the College of Law, the deposit is forfeited. The offered admission is good only for the semester for which it was granted. A deferment may be granted under special circumstances for one year. The fact that an applicant was admitted in a previous year but did not attend is given no weight in evaluating a subsequent application.

Applicants will be notified when their files are complete. If any information is missing, the applicant will be notified in time to submit the information before the deadline.

The application deadline is March 15. All applicants should be notified of their admission status by May 15.

Early Admission Program

In addition to the fall class, the College of Law also offers admission to a select group of students commencing in the summer term which starts in late May or June. Students selected for this program participate in an intensive program designed to facilitate their entry into the fall class. Applicants may apply for both fall admission and the Early Admission Program. These students will be identified by the Admissions Committee on the basis of factors, in addition to their GPA and LSAT, which demonstrate that they are capable of success in the study and practice of law. Students in the Early Admission Program are required to complete five or six hours of regular law coursework during the summer session prior to the fall semester for which admission is sought.

Transfer with Advanced Standing

To be considered for transfer with advanced standing, an applicant must have attended an ABA accredited law school. Students must complete one full year of study before being admitted. Admission for transfer is based upon law school GPA, class standing, and various other factors. Transfer applicants must submit:

  • a completed copy of the University of Oklahoma College of Law Application for Admission and all related and supporting materials;
  • LSAT scores (which will be requested by the College of Law from LSDAS);
  • transcripts from all law schools attended;
  • a letter from the Registrar indicating that the transfer applicant is in good standing and eligible to continue, including class rank through the end of the last semester attended;
  • a personal statement indicating reasons for wanting the transfer; and
  • non-refundable application fee.

Transfer applicants are encouraged to apply online.

Transfer applications must be submitted by June 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester. Applicants will be notified as soon as a decision has been made.

A student cannot receive credit for work taken in another law school when enrolled at the same time in classes in the OU College of Law. When a student transfers to the College of Law from another school, grades at the other school will not be counted in determining the student’s cumulative grade point average or class standing at the OU College of Law. Applicants who have been dismissed from another law school for scholarly deficiency or serious academic misconduct will not be considered for admission.

Grades

The grades given in the College of Law and the numerical grade point value are as follows: A+ = 12, A = 11, A- = 10, B+ = 9, B = 8, B- = 7, C+ = 6, C = 5, C- = 4, D+ = 3, D = 2, D- = 1, F = 0. The grades of Incomplete (I), Withdrawal Passing (W), Administrative Withdrawal (AW), Satisfactory (S) and Unsatisfactory (U) have no numerical value and are not included in the calculation of a student’s grade point average. Certain courses are graded on a Satisfactory (S)/Unsatisfactory (U) basis. Students do not have the option of choosing to be graded S/U.

Attendance

Regular attendance in courses is considered indispensable. Each professor must adopt and announce an attendance policy that meets the requirements of the American Bar Association and the Association of American Law Schools. When a student is absent an excessive number of times, the professor may withdraw the student from the course, or the professor may lower the student’s grade (even to failing) in the course.

The college is a full-time law school, and students are expected to devote substantially all their time to the study of law. Excessive outside work is discouraged.  White the American Bar Association doesn't monitor this anymore, OU College of Law policy states that a student may not work in excess of 20 hours per week while enrolled.  First year students are urged to forego any substantial outside activities until they have had ample opportunity to measure the demands of legal study upon their time and energy.

Course Load

The College of Law limits the number of hours in which a student may enroll during a semester, thus assuring each student the opportunity for sufficient concentration on each subject. First-year students may enroll only in prescribed first-year courses. Second- and third-year students should enroll in a minimum of 10 credit  hours and a maximum of 18 credit hours in a regular semester and a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 10 credit hours in a summer session, to be considered full-time students. Course loads less than (i.e., not considered full-time) or in excess of these hours must be approved by the Associate Dean for Academics and Curriculum Committee.  In no instance is a student allowed to enroll in more than 18 hours per the parameters set by the American Bar Association..

Class Rank

A student’s class ranking is available when grades are processed each semester. Grades are available online. Class rank is usually available within three days following the distribution of grades.

Code of Academic Responsibility

Conduct of law students in the law school is governed by a Code of Academic Responsibility. Each student is to abide by the Code, which represents the ethical standards of the legal profession. The complete text of the Code of Academic Responsibility is included in the first-year orientation materials, and is also available in the Student Services office.

Academic Appeals Board

The University of Oklahoma’s “Joint Statement: Rights and Freedoms of Students” provides that students shall have “protection through orderly procedures against prejudiced or capricious academic evaluation.” The rules of procedure governing proceedings before the Academic Appeals Board are provided in the Law Student Handbook, which can be found on the law student intranet.

Courses

ILAW 5000. Law Study Abroad.1-15 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of the College of Law. Course is designed to facilitate student participation in law study abroad and reciprocal exchange programs. (Irreg.)

ILAW 6000. Law Study Abroad.1-15 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of the College of Law. Course is designed to facilitate student participation in law study abroad and reciprocal exchange programs. (Irreg.)

LAW 2144. Torts.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Introduction to basic principles of civil liability, with study of selected issues, which may include intentional wrongs, negligence, strict liability, vicarious liability, defenses and immunities, comparative fault, assessment of damages, nuisance, products liability, misrepresentation, injuries to reputation, and alternative compensation systems. (F, Sp)

LAW 5000. Professional Writing for Litigators.2-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Legal Research & Writing I and II (LAW 5123 and LAW 5202). Provides students with the tools necessary to evaluate, modify, and design litigation documents (excluding substantive motions and briefs). The focus is on learning the processes necessary for effective written communication with clients and other professionals and for production of litigation-related documents. Completion of this course is required for the Litigation Certificate and does not satisfy any credit hour requirements for the J.D. (F, Sp)

LAW 5003. Argumentation and Public Speaking for Lawyers.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Explores the art of public speaking and argumentation to audiences typically encountered by lawyers. The course will focus on strategies and theories of communication that outline how to construct and deliver effective arguments, enabling students to hone their skills through practical applications. Completion of this course is required for the Litigation Certificate and does not satisfy any credit hour requirements for the J.D. (F, Sp)

LAW 5010. International Student Private Law Firm Internship.0 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to College of Law; Acceptance into a summer Internship; Must be an International student here on an F-1 Visa. This course allows international juris doctor students with F-1 Visas to work in a private law firm internship. During the internship, students gain substantive legal experience while learning about a variety of legal concepts. The students will gain real-world experience so that they graduate from law school with practical legal experiences and a well-rounded skill set. (Su)

LAW 5103. Civil Procedure I.3 Credit Hours.

Civil procedure in state and federal courts; introductory survey of procedures by which questions of substantive law commonly are raised and determined; procedural and remedial background; law governing controversies in federal courts; details of procedure in a lawsuit, including forum selection, pleading, joinder of claims and parties, discovery, the pretrial conference, disposition without trial, trial before a judge or jury, post-trial motions and appeals; issue and claim preclusion. (F)

LAW 5114. Contracts.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to College of Law. Basic first-year survey course which explores the nature and enforceability of promises. Subjects include contract formation, performance, termination of contracts, material breach, remedies for breach of contract, mistake and excuse for nonperformance, statute of frauds, interpretation of contract language, conditions, assignment and delegation, and third party beneficiaries. (F)

LAW 5123. Legal Research, Writing & Analysis I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Focuses on the legal research, writing, and communication skills necessary for a lawyer to identify a client's legal issue; research and understand the relevant law; and precisely and objectively analyze how the law applies to the client's situation, so the lawyer can advise the client or decide how to best meet the client's goals. (F)

LAW 5130. Lincoln, the Constitution and the Crisis of the Union.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: LAW 5134. Study of: 1) the constitutional debate about the character of a 'more perfect union' and federalism prior to 1861; 2) the limited commitment to human rights in the pre-1868 Constitution, and the antebellum inspirations for the Reconstruction constitutional amendments; 3) the national government's powers to preserve the Union, and the South's claim of a constitutional right to secede. (F, Sp)

LAW 5134. Constitutional Law.4 Credit Hours.

Selected issues, including: judicial review; the judicial process in construing and applying the United States Constitution; federal and state powers, federalism and separation of powers; an introduction to the concepts of equal protection and due process. (Sp)

LAW 5144. Torts.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Introduction to basic principles of civil liability, with study of selected issues, which may include intentional wrongs, negligence, strict liability, vicarious liability, defenses and immunities, comparative fault, assessment of damages, nuisance, products liability, misrepresentation, injuries to reputation, and alternative compensation systems. (F, Sp)

LAW 5153. Supreme Court Theory and Practice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5134. In this course on the decision-making processes and practices before and behind-the-scenes at the Supreme Court, students act as law clerks assisting in the review of pending certiorari petitions; lawyers arguing pending cases; justices voting on those cases and drafting judicial opinions deciding them; and scholars studying the Court's role as a key and controversial institution in our constitutional democracy. (F, Sp)

LAW 5201. Introduction to Brief Writing.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Law and LAW 5123. Introduction to the principles and practice of written advocacy. Students complete a trial-level motion brief and appellate brief. While building on the analytical, writing, and research skills learned in LRWA I, this course focuses on the lawyer's need to become self-directed and reflective while engaging in increasingly complex research, legal analysis, writing, and editing for persuasion. (Sp)

LAW 5202. Legal Research, Writing & Advocacy II.2 Credit Hours.

Introduction to oral advocacy and brief writing. (Sp)

LAW 5203. Civil Procedure II.3 Credit Hours.

Civil procedure in state and federal courts; introductory survey of procedures by which questions of substantive law commonly are raised and determined; procedural and remedial background; law governing controversies in federal courts; details of procedure in a lawsuit, including forum selection, pleading, joinder or claims and parties, discovery, the pretrial conference, disposition without trial, trial before a judge or jury, post-trial motions and appeals; issue and claim preclusion. (F)

LAW 5223. Criminal Law.3 Credit Hours.

General principles of criminal responsibility and the elements of common law, statutory crimes, and defenses. Emphasis is placed on the subject of criminal intent. (Sp)

LAW 5234. Property.4 Credit Hours.

Introduction to basic property concepts, including: adverse possession; estates in land; landlord and tenant; concurrent estates; nonpossessory interests (including easements, licenses, covenants and equitable servitudes); and real estate transactions. (Sp)

LAW 5301. Oral Advocacy.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Law and LAW 5201. Using appellate briefs written in Introduction to Brief Writing, students will study principles of oral advocacy and learn to effectively organize and make affirmative oral arguments and respond to questions and concerns in a simulated courtroom setting. The course culminates in three mock appellate-level oral arguments before panels of student judges, professors, practitioners, and judges. (Sp)

LAW 5303. Criminal Procedure: Investigation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5223. Examines the constitutional criminal procedure of police investigations, including the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable search and seizure, the Fifth Amendment's guarantee of due process and privilege against compulsory self-incrimination, and the Sixth Amendment's right to counsel. (F, Sp)

LAW 5314. Evidence.4 Credit Hours.

Presentation of evidence; judicial control and legal reasoning in the determination of issues of fact; topics relating to the admissibility of evidence, including relevancy, testimonial and real evidence; the original writing rule; and topics relating to the exclusion of evidence, including hearsay, the right of confrontation and privileged communications. (F, Sp)

LAW 5323. Professional Responsibility.3 Credit Hours.

The nature of law as a profession; problems facing the profession and the individual lawyer. Fundamentals of legal ethics and responsibilities, with emphasis on the Model Rules of Professional Conduct of the American Bar Association. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 5403. Administrative Law.3 Credit Hours.

Basic considerations relating to administrative agencies, including nondelegation doctrine, fact versus law distinction, agency rule making, adjudication, due process requirements, information gathering, and judicial review. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 5410. Bankruptcy.3-4 Credit Hours.

3 to 4 hours. Rights and remedies of debtors and creditors; bankruptcy including liquidation, reorganization, and wage earner plans; attachment, judgment execution; garnishment, fraudulent conveyances, bulk sales and collection remedies including compositions and assignments. (F, Sp)

LAW 5433. Corporations.3 Credit Hours.

Formation of corporations; duties and powers of corporate management; corporate control; shareholder rights, shares, dividends; derivative suits, fundamental changes and dissolution. (F, Sp)

LAW 5434. Business Associations.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Introduction to the law of business associations with a focus on the modern corporation. Particular attention is directed to organizational structuring and the allocation of control among stockholders, directors, and officers. Federal securities law is introduced, but not covered in a substantial manner. Limited attention will also be given to the basic principles of agency, partnerships, LPs, and LLCs. (F, Sp)

LAW 5443. Family Law.3 Credit Hours.

The rights, obligations, and liabilities arising from marital and nonmarital relations; divorce; marital property alimony, child support. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 5450. The First Amendment.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 5214. The First Amendment: Individual rights of expression, assembly, association and religion. Permissible government restrictions and regulations in relation to activities protected by the First Amendment. (Irreg.)

LAW 5463. Income Taxation of Individuals.3 Credit Hours.

Structure of the federal income tax with emphasis on operation of the system through use of concepts such as income, basis, gains and losses, realization and recognition, exclusions and deductions. (F, Sp)

LAW 5470. Wills and Trusts.3-4 Credit Hours.

3 to 4 hours. Intestate succession, execution, interpretation, amendment, revocation and contest of wills, rights of decedent's family, will substitutes and the avoidance of probate; creation, validity, funding, amendment and termination of trusts and the fiduciary obligation. (F, Sp)

LAW 5520. Alternative Dispute Resolution.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Negotiation, mediation and arbitration; includes court-ordered arbitration, mini-trials, summary jury trials and other formal and informal means of resolving disputes short of formal court adjudication. (Irreg.)

LAW 5530. Civil Pretrial Litigation.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. The study of litigation tactics and techniques prior to trial. Included are discovery, motion practice, witness preparation, settlement, alternate dispute resolution, pretrial conferences, mini-trials, summary jury trials, and other related areas. (F, Sp)

LAW 5533. Conflict of Law.3 Credit Hours.

The law relating to transactions with elements in more than one state or nation, jurisdiction of courts and enforcement of foreign judgments, choice of law problems, constitutional issues, and the theoretical basis of choice of law, including an introduction to the problems of renvoi and characterization. (Irreg.)

LAW 5543. Federal Courts.3 Credit Hours.

Examines concepts of case or controversy, federal subject matter jurisdiction; supplemental jurisdiction; venue; removal; substantive law applied in federal courts; and the relationship of the state and federal courts. (Irreg.)

LAW 5553. Remedies.3 Credit Hours.

A study of remedies available in court actions, including specific performance, injunctions, and other equitable remedies. (F, Sp)

LAW 5600. Selected Legal Problems in American Indian Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Content varies. Study of current legal problems as they relate to Indian law. (Irreg.)

LAW 5602. Comparative Indigenous Peoples' Law Seminar.2-2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to College of Law. Seminar will examine the differences and similarities between Canadian, United States, Australian and New Zealand laws affecting native peoples. Participants in the seminar will include students from law schools at University of Ottawa, University of Saskatchewan, Auckland University, and Monash University attending via television. Federal Indian law is not a prerequisite, but strongly recommended. (Sp)

LAW 5603. Native American Natural Resources-MLS.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to Masters of Legal Studies Program. Provides an overview of the history of U.S. native policy and the basic doctrines of Indian law, then covers a variety of issues relating to tribal interests in and jurisdiction over environmental resources. Topics includes tribal rights to land; land use and environmental protection in Indian country; economic and natural resource development issues (including grazing, minerals, timber, and taxation); hunting and fishing rights; as well as international perspectives on indigenous resources. Throughout the course, students will consider the roles of the tribal, federal, and state governments in resource regulation and use. (F, Sp)

LAW 5610. Federal Indian Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 or 3 hours. The history of federal Indian policy and its impact on modern Indian problems; the Bureau of Indian Affairs; the federal government-Indian relationship and policy; tribal sovereignty; states' rights; criminal, civil, and taxing jurisdiction in Indian country; rights of individual Indians; tribal self-government; property rights; water rights; andhunting and fishing rights. (F).

LAW 5623. Religion, Culture & Indian Law-MLS.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to online Masters of Legal Studies Program. Examines the roles of law and policy on Native American religious and cultural practice. Explores issues relating to tribal interests and jurisdiction over Native religion and culture including information concerning preservation, restoration, and destruction of sacred sites and indigenous remains, the laws and practices pertaining to species protection and sacred species, institutionalized persons, as well as entheogens, protection of cultural and intellectual resources. International law as related to indigenous religions and culture is also explored.(F, Sp)

LAW 5633. Native American Natural Resources.3-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to College of Law. Covers a variety of issues relating to tribal interests in and jurisdiction over environmental resources. Course coverage includes tribal rights to land; land use and environmental protection in Indian country; economic and natural resource development issues (including grazing, minerals, timber and taxation), water rights, and hunting and fishing rights. (F, Sp)

LAW 5642. Indigenous Peacemaking.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Students will compare and contrast Tribal Justice and the American Justice system, and the history of dispute resolution of Tribal Nations. Students will examine peacemaking through case studies demonstrating healing through justice. Peacemaking designs to restore harmony while developing the wisdom of consensus outcomes. Students will learn through study and participation the structure of the peacemaking circle and community development. (F, Sp)

LAW 5663. Federal Indian Water Law-MLS.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to Masters of Legal Studies Program. Explores the context, decisional and statutory law, and overarching polices that shape water law. Examines foundations in both federal Indian law and basic principles of water law, including relevant substantive and procedural law, and mechanics and social issues relating to water resource management. Also, explores state and federal powers and roles in relation to American Indian tribes and water resources; intergovernmental/ intercommunity conflict, as well as methods of management and resolution. (F, Sp)

LAW 5673. Indian Gaming Laws & Regulations-MLS.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to Masters of Legal Studies Program. Examines litigation and history of tribal gaming, along with critical decisions rulings on tribal/state compacting and scope of gaming conflicts. Explores tribal compacting experiences around the country with focus on Oklahoma tribes and the Oklahoma Model Gaming Compact of 2004. Distinguishes the regulatory roles of tribes, states and the feds and explores differences in Class II and Class III gaming, regulations and disputes. Explains creative approaches to financing and development of tribal gaming facilities. (F, Sp)

LAW 5703. Antitrust Law.3 Credit Hours.

Federal and state antitrust laws approached on the basis of type of conduct, i.e., monopolies, mergers, price control by private business, exclusive dealing contracts, fair trade pricing, agreements not to compete; discrimination in distribution and refusals to deal; and unfair trade practices. (F)

LAW 5712. Corporate Drafting.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5433 or LAW 5434. Will cover transactional drafting skills as well as business planning and counseling in the corporate setting. Students will draft a variety of corporate and transactional provisions and documents such as certificates of incorporation, bylaws, board resolutions, and proxy statements. (F, Sp)

LAW 5713. Transactional Law Practicum I: Business Combinations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5433 or LAW 5434. This course offers the opportunity to learn about transactional law practice by completing a simulated public company corporate transaction. (F)

LAW 5720. Corporate Finance.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 or 3 hours. The course will cover advanced topics in corporate law, including valuation, senior securities, successor liability and mergers and acquisitions. (Irreg.)

LAW 5733. Unincorporated Business Entities.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law.Deals with the legal principles concerning association in business by agency, partnership, and other unincorporated forms. The agency relationship and its consequences are covered in detail. Unincorporated business organizations such as the general partnership, LP, and LLC are covered, focusing on topics such as formation, liability, fiduciary obligations, and dissolution. If time permits LLP and closely-held corporations will be included. (F, Sp)

LAW 5740. Payment Systems.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Course will cover the checking system, the credit and debit card system, electronic funds transfer, letters of credit, interest payments, negotiable instruments and the securities trading and settlement system. Substantive law would be Articles 3, 4, 4A, 5 and 8 of the UCC as well as the Expedited Funds Availability Act, parts of the Truth in Lending Act and the Electronic Funds Transfer Act (and implementing regulations.) (F, Sp)

LAW 5743. Transactional Law Practicum II: Law of Innovation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5433 or LAW 5434. This course offers the opportunity to learn and experience the law of innovation by advising in a start-up context in a simulation. (Sp)

LAW 5750. Secured Transactions.3-4 Credit Hours.

3 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. This course covers Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Topics include the establishment and perfection of security interests pursuant to credit sales contracts, problems of focusing on the interface between Article 9 and federal bankruptcy law, priority disputes among collateral claimants, default, and rights after default. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the code's statutory scheme. (F, Sp)

LAW 5753. Federal Securities Regulation.3 Credit Hours.

Federal securities laws and the activities and industry they govern; the meaning of "security"; regulation of the issuance, sale, resale, and purchase of securities; disclosure requirements, generated by registration; anti-fraud provisions; and civil liability. (F, Sp)

LAW 5763. Mergers and Acquisitions.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: prior or concurrent enrollment in 5433. Provides an understanding of the issues arising in business acquisition (and divestiture) transactions. Coverage is given to theories underlying acquisitions, alternative acquisition techniques and planning considerations that bear on the choice among those techniques. (Sp)

LAW 5773. Consumer Finance Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to College of Law. This course covers the law and finance of household lending. The course will go over basic financial principles and household lending laws to give students a background in these topics that will help them represent clients as well navigate their own personal financial lives. (F, Sp)

LAW 5810. Capital Punishment and the Judicial Process.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 or 3 hours. Study of the death penalty in the United States, including: the history of capital punishment; constitutional issues mitigating and aggravating evidence in guiding the sentencer's decision to impose; exclusion of jurors; use of psychiatric experts; state post-conviction remedies; federal habeas review; recently-expanded federal death penalty; and international law and capital punishment. (Irreg.)

LAW 5830. Criminal Procedure: Adjudication.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: LAW 5223. Examines the adjudicatory phase of our criminal procedure, beginning after arrest and continuing through to post-conviction matters. We consider federal constitutional provisions and rules of procedure, the policies underlying those requirements, and their impact on the roles of prosecution and defense counsel. (F, Sp)

LAW 5913. American Legal History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to College of Law. The development and characteristics of American legal institutions and basic themes in American law and legal philosophy. (Sp)

LAW 5920. Complex Litigation.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Examines the procedure for preparation and trial of mass tort and other complex cases in federal court including: jurisdiction, joinder, intervention, consolidation, transfer, discovery, preclusion, class action, and trial procedures. (Irreg.)

LAW 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LAW 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

LAW 6010. English Legal System.1-2 Credit Hours.

1 or 2 hours. This course covers England's contemporary legal system. Topics covered include the courts, the organization of the legal profession, the nature of the practice of law in England, access to civil and criminal justice and alternative dispute resolution. (Su)

LAW 6020. Comparative Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 or 3 hours. A comparison of the corresponding features of the American system of law and the systems of law of other nations. (F)

LAW 6030. European Union Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. This course covers the legal status of the European Union and the sources, implementation, and enforcement of community law. Emphasis will be placed on the competition law of the European Union. (Su)

LAW 6040. International Business Transactions.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 or 3 hours. Legal issues in international trade, licensing, and investment; limitations affecting movement of goods and flow of capital; organization, financing, and protection of international business; contract negotiation and dispute resolution and foreign investment. (F)

LAW 6050. International Human Rights.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. The sources, norms, institutions, and process of international human rights law; the incorporation of human rights law into domestic legal systems, particularly the United States. (Irreg.)

LAW 6060. International Law Foundations.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. An introduction to the international legal system: its structure, rules, and process; the incorporation of international law into domestic legal system, particularly in the United States; in current issues including dispute resolution, jurisdiction, environmental protection, human rights, and use of force. The course is not international business transactions or comparative law. (Sp)

LAW 6100. Selected Legal Problems.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Involved current legal problems. Subject matter and course credit will be included with the enrollment instructions. (F, Sp)

LAW 6110. Bioethics and the Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Legal, ethical, and economic analysis of problems posed by advances in biomedical technologies. Includes problems raised by behavior control through direct organic intervention, genetic engineering; extension of human powers and faculties by artificial means, human reproduction and death control; and regulation of experimentation involving human subjects. (Irreg.)

LAW 6190. Health Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 or 3 hours. The legal aspects of medicine; civil liability of medical professionals and health care providers; organization and regulation of the medical profession; uses of medical science in litigation; selected health sciences and public policy issues such as human reproduction, the right to treatment, and mental health problems. (F, Sp)

LAW 6203. Design Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Focuses on intellectual property protection for designs. Specific areas of coverage will include design patents, copyright in useful articles, trade dress, and sui generis design laws. Although this course will mainly focus on U.S. law, it will also cover the European design protection system and the Hague Agreement Concerning the International Registration of Industrial Designs. (F, Sp)

LAW 6210. Immigration Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Constitutional, statutory, and regulatory framework for the admission, exclusion, and deportation of non-citizens who seek immigrant and non-immigrant status in the United States; refugee and asylum law and policy, and citizenship acquisition. (F, Sp)

LAW 6213. Intellectual Property Survey.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Provides a high-level introduction to U.S. IP law. Specific areas of coverage include patents, trade secrets, trademarks, and copyright. This course is designed for students who plan to specialize in IP and would like a high-level overview, students who are not sure if they'd like to specialize IP, and students who plan to work in any commercial setting. (F, Sp)

LAW 6223. Trademarks & Unfair Competition.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. This course provides an in-depth survey of U.S. law related to the law, theory, and institutions governing trademarks and unfair competition. Specific areas of coverage will include trademark registration, the scope and nature of trademark rights, rights of publicity, domain name disputes and the law of false advertising. (F, Sp)

LAW 6311. American Indian Law Review.1 Credit Hour.

Production of a written note or comment for the Review or other approved activities associated with production of the Review. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 6313. Child Abuse Clinic.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5443, 6113. Each student enrolls for an entire academic year for three hours each semester. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 6320. Directed Legal Research.1-2 Credit Hours.

1 to 2 hours. Legal research and writing under the supervision of a faculty member. The student must write a paper of sufficient quality to be considered for publication in a law review or other publication. A student may enroll in one or two credit hours with supervising faculty member's permission. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 6321. Competitions.1 Credit Hour.

Students who participate on a trial or appellate advocacy competition team sponsored by the College of Law and directly supervised by a faculty member may enroll in this course. (F, Sp)

LAW 6323. Criminal Defense Clinic.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: 5104, 5314, 5323, and legal intern license. Clinical experience providing students the opportunity to represent indigent defendants charged with municipal, misdemeanor and felony offenses in Cleveland and McClain Counties . Students handle every aspect of the defense of a criminal case, including interviewing, investigating, negotiating, litigating motions and conducting the trial. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 6331. Oil & Gas, Natural Resources, and Energy Journal.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: admission to College of Law and ONE J membership. Production of case summaries of recently released court decisions on matters relating to oil and gas, natural resources, and/or energy. (F, Sp)

LAW 6341. Appellate Advocacy Competitions.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Must be chosen for a competition team. Students will receive instruction on research, writing, and oral advocacy skills. Students participate in groups (teams) to research and write an appellate advocacy brief, and practice oral arguments. Students will compete in regional and national competitions. (F, Sp)

LAW 6342. Advanced Persuasive Writing.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5123 and LAW 5202. We will approach persuasive writing from different practical and theoretical perspectives as we investigate why some writing is more persuasive than others and the specific steps we can take to make our legal writing more effective. Students continually critique contemporary examples, write, edit, and receive critique, having repeated opportunities to gain new insights and put them to use. (F, Sp)

LAW 6360. Interviewing, Counseling and Negotiation.2-3 Credit Hours.

3 to 4 hours. Theoretical and practical aspects of interviewing, counseling and negotiation, including simulation of situations calling for these skills, taught in a lecture-workshop format with a lecture and demonstration on a particular topic each week, followed by small workshops in which students simulate the lawyer's role. (F, Sp)

LAW 6363. Civil Clinic.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: 5104, 5314, 5323 and intern license. Student interns, working from an office operated by the Law Center, participate in actual representation of low-income clients in civil trials and transactions. Experience is acquired through court appearances, jury and non-jury trials, interviewing, discovery, drafting of pleadings, negotiation and counseling under the supervision of the clinical legal education staff. Students maintain an active caseload and office hours. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 6382. Intermediate Legal Writing: Introduction to Non-litigation Drafting.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5123 and LAW 5202. Course will provide you with the tools necessary to design, evaluate, and modify non-litigation documents, including contracts, wills, client letters, and legislation. Students will identify document users, determine competing objectives and interests, choose among drafting alternatives consistent with the relevant law, and test the content and organization of documents for intended and unintended consequences. (Sp)

LAW 6391. Oklahoma Law Review.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Oklahoma Law Review membership. Production of a written note or comment for the Review or other approved activities associated with production of the Review. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 6392. Advanced Legal Research.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LAW 5123 and LAW 5202. The ability to "find the law" is an important practical skill for attorneys. The goal of the course is to further develop a student's ability to find solutions to legal problems by formulating efficient and effective legal research strategies. This course emphasizes advanced online search techniques and explores how technology is impacting the delivery of legal information. (Sp)

LAW 6400. Selected Legal Problems of Applied Nature.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Subject matter and course credit will be announced. (F, Sp)

LAW 6410. Trial Techniques.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 5314. An introduction to basic trial techniques under simulated trial situations. Students will conduct opening statements, direct and cross examination of witnesses, introduce and use exhibits, impeachment, expert examination, jury selection, closing arguments and a final trial. (F, Sp, Su)

LAW 6412. Representing the Criminally Accused.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law; LAW 5314 recommended. Focuses on the practical aspects of criminal defense, from the business end of private practice to practical considerations such as whether to litigate and how to negotiate better deals. Students select a fact pattern then draft and argue bond hearings, conduct a preliminary hearing and argue a pre-trial motion. Relevant handouts are provided and students will conduct legal research. (F)

LAW 6422. Bar Exam Preparation I: Strategies and Tactics for Success.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Designed to help get a jump on preparations to pass the bar, but IS NOT a substitute for commercial bar exam preparation courses. Students will review substantive law in at least three areas heavily tested on the bar exam as they learn and practice skills necessary to maximize scores on both the multiple choice and essay portions of the exam. (F, Sp)

LAW 6500. Selected Problems in Agriculture.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Selected issues in agricultural law, including agriculture environmental law, agricultural administrative law, agriculture public law, cooperatives. (Irreg.)

LAW 6501. Introduction to Petroleum Engineering and Geo-Sciences-MLS.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: admission to Masters of Legal Studies Program. Presents an overview of the production life cycle from discovery to development and production of oil and gas. The course examines the different roles of the key players in each stage of this process. (F, Sp)

LAW 6510. Energy and Natural Resources.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Regulation of natural resources capable of energy fuels production; environmental technological and economic impacts of coal, water, oil, gas, uranium, and solar energy sources through exploration, development, production, transportation, and end use; legal context of natural resource conservation, allocation, and distribution. (Irreg.)

LAW 6523. Environmental Law.3 Credit Hours.

Common law and statutory approaches to environmental, economic, and technological impacts on society; jurisprudential underpinnings of environmental law; environmental administrative process and scope of judicial review; quality standards for land, air, and water, including minimal standards for preventing degradation or exhaustion of human and natural environments. (F, Sp)

LAW 6540. Oil and Gas.3-4 Credit Hours.

3 to 4 hours. Nature of property interests in oil and gas; conveyancing of interests in oil and gas; legal interests created by oil and gas leases; the validity of leases; the habendum, drilling, and rental clauses; assignment of interests of lessor and lessee; rents and royalties; and the conservation of oil and gas. (F, Sp)

LAW 6542. Midstream Oil and Gas Practice.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law; LAW 6540 recommended. An overview and examination of the legal issues facing the midstream sector of the oil and gas industry. This sector involves the gathering, transportation, storage, and marketing of oil and gas. Legal issues examined will include: the state and federal regulation of midstream operations; the negotiation of midstream contracts; and the use of Master Limited Partnerships to own midstream assets. (F, Sp)

LAW 6543. Copyright.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Provides an in-depth survey of U.S. copyright law, theory, and policy. Topics will include the basic requirements for copyright protection, the nature and scope of the rights granted by the Copyright Act, and the normative foundations of copyright law. No technical background is required. (F)

LAW 6550. Oil and Gas Contracts.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Examination of contracts used in the oil and gas industry for exploration, production and development of oil and gas properties and for investment; the nature of the relationships created by such contracts, the rights and duties of the parties, income tax consequences and governmental regulation of such contracts. (Sp)

LAW 6552. International Petroleum Transactions.2 Credit Hours.

This course will study the international oil and gas business, a business that must be uniquely concerned with both public and private international law, as well as domestic law of the business entity's home state, the host government, and oftentimes, a third country. Students will study the sovereign rights to minerals, including disputes that arise between neighboring countries regarding boundary disputes. Students will look at how crude oil is bought and sold on the world market. Students will study the various types of host government contracts used by various countries to assign development rights to private companies, including how such rights are acquired, and study how disputes between a private company and host government are resolved. Students will also look at contracts between private companies engaged in exploration and production operations. (Sp)

LAW 6560. Title Examination and Assurance.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. A study of conveyancing, with emphasis on the examination of abstracts of title to real property. (F, Sp)

LAW 6570. Real Estate Transactions.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. The first two-thirds of the course covers the terms and legal issues involved in drafting, executing, and enforcing residential real estate contracts, including obtaining and evaluating title evidence prior to closing and recovery for breach of title guarantees. The last third of the course will introduce certain basic commercial real estate transactions, including processes and issues involved in housing subdivisions, condominiums, shopping centers, and commercial leases. (Irreg.)

LAW 6580. Water Law.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. The system of water rights; riparian, appropriation, and prescriptive rights; stream, surface, and ground water; transfer and termination of rights; injuries caused by water; development of water supplies; federal-state, interstate, and intrastate conflicts; water pollution control; federal and Indian rights and federal water resource problems. (F, Sp)

LAW 6662. Employment Law Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

The law of employment, including personnel practices, employment contracts, employee rights and federal-state regulation of employer-employee relationships. (Irreg.)

LAW 6670. Torts III.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Tort remedies for interference with family relations, economic relations, and public rights, misuse of judicial process; economic and business torts, including interference with contractual relations, injurious falsehood, unfair competition, and misappropriation; publicity and privacy. (Irreg.)

LAW 6680. Family and Law of Torts Seminar.1-2 Credit Hours.

1 to 2 hours. Tort liability within the family, family tort liability to third parties, injuries to family members, interference with family relationships, wrongful birth, and related topics. (Sp)

LAW 6682. Law and Literature Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Law. The format of the seminar will involve reading and discussion of selected classical and contemporary works which have a legal theme or influence. The grade will be based on a composite of class participation, short papers, and a group presentation on one of the assigned readings. (F, Sp)

LAW 6692. Environmental Law Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Law. The format of the seminar will involve reading and discussion of selected classical and contemporary scientific and legal works which have an environmental theme or influence. The grade will be based on a composite of class participation, short papers, and a group presentation on one of the assigned readings. (F, Sp)

LAW 6700. Selected Legal Problems Seminar.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. May be repeated twice with change of content. Involves current legal problems. Subject matter and course credit will be included with the enrollment instructions. (F, Sp)

LAW 6722. Indian Gaming Law & Regulation.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Students will learn the legal and political history of the development of the Indian Gaming Industry with emphasis on the events directly impacting tribal gaming in the State of Oklahoma. We will study the pivotal court rulings related to the compacting and scope of gaming wars of the1990's and discuss comparable tribal experiences around the nation. (F, Sp)

LAW 6732. War Crimes Tribunals Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Examines various judicial institutions established outside the control of national legal systems for the prosecution of certain international atrocity crimes, including the International Criminal Tribunals for Yugoslavia and Rwanda, the Extraordinary Chambers of the Cambodian Courts and the Special Court of Sierra Leone. Attention will be paid to the background, jurisdiction, procedures, substantive law and daily operations of such institutions. (F, Sp)

LAW 6742. The International Criminal Court Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Examines the International Criminal Court, the first permanent institution to prosecute atrocity crimes. Beginning with the creation of the ICC, the course will address the ICC's jurisdiction, substantive crimes, trial, appeal and punishment, while exploring situations and cases before the ICC. Discussions will include the future of the court, its emerging jurisprudence and the United States' evolving perspective and involvement. (F, Sp)

LAW 6752. Comparative Responses to Terrorism and Political Violence Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Examination of a wide range of legal issues related to terrorism and governmental responses. Topics include the framework of separate branches of government with shared national security power; fighting terrorists and international criminals; and protecting national security information in a democratic society. (F, Sp)

LAW 6762. Comparative Criminal Law Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Review and comparison of select criminal law issues in various national legal systems. Issues include the purpose and benefits of studying comparative law generally while covering specific topics including, among others, police powers and investigations, the role of the judiciary, role of the jury, due process concerns and the objectives of punishment. (F, Sp)

LAW 6772. Federal Sentencing Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to College of Law. Examines aspects of sentencing unique to the federal court system, including application of complex sentencing guidelines. Federal sentencing provides one of the last frontiers for pure legal advocacy, as litigants seek departures or variances to fit the circumstances of the case while providing insight into the victims and/or defendants. Both critical guideline analysis and creative argument are reviewed and applied. (F, Sp)

LAW 6782. Perspectives on Governmental Law.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Seminar designed around three vantage points or "perspectives" of Governmental legal practice -- Federal, State, and Tribal. Each perspective highlights the unique legal issues of governmental practice. Perspectives will be taught in a mentoring style. Topics will include: the duty to serve the public interest, open government, policy making, and the role of the lawyer advisor. (F)

LAW 6792. Federal Indian Water Law Seminar.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the College of Law. Students will study water rights and their management, and examine the complexity of inter-sovereign resource disputes. Will also explore the history and policy that have shaped water law, building on foundational Indian law cases and relevant history. Also will examine the substantive rules of federal Indian law cases and the complex intergovernmental processes in which these rules are applied. (F, Sp)

LAW 6820. Business Tax.3-4 Credit Hours.

3 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: LAW 5463. This course surveys the federal income tax laws on organizing and running businesses as corporations, partnerships, S corporations, and LLCs. Also, the course looks at the taxation of oil and gas operations including exploration, development, production, and abandonment. No technical background is required. (F, Sp)

LAW 6830. Pensions and Employee Benefit Plans.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Planning, establishment, and administration of pension, health care and other employee benefit plans under the tax and labor laws. (Irreg.)

LAW 6832. Partnership Tax.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5463. Subchapter K of the Internal Revenue Code, involving taxation of partnerships and partners. (F)

LAW 6840. Tax Procedure.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 5463. Federal tax procedure and conflict resolution, including administrative practice, trial and appellate review. (Irreg.)

LSH 5902. Introduction to the American Legal System.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Program. Examines the United States court system, the role of the Constitution, and other foundations in US law and their relation to the healthcare system. Introduces students to fundamental principles in US law. Explains how law functions with our society and how it plays a role in conflict resolution, civil liberties, equality, in contracts, and interacts with the U.S. healthcare system. (F, Sp)

LSH 6102. Structure of Health Care Enterprises: Legal Forms, Governance, and Relationships.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. The course will cover the different legal forms a healthcare enterprise can take, including; Non-profits, physician owned, government owned, and Hospital systems. This course will also familiarize students with the contents and role of organizational documents, Governance issues, fiduciary duties, issues for tax exempt organizations, and relationships between Physicians and tax-exempt entities. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6112. Sources and Types of Liability of Healthcare Institutions and Professionals.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Will discuss how the healthcare providers and institutions can be held liable as well as the consequences of agency and contractor status. In addition, this course will cover the elements of negligence in cases involving healthcare professionals. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6123. Regulation of Private Health Insurance, Managed Care.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. This course will cover the regulation of health insurance companies with a focus on changes brought about by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Students will become familiar with managed care concepts and analyze key components of health care plans. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6132. Quality Control: Licensing, Accreditation, and Quality Regulation.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Designed to introduce students to the laws, agencies, and other bodies that license, regulate and discipline physicians. Topics covered will include licensing proceedings and hearings and health care entity policies addressing these issues. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6142. Professional Relationships in Health Care Enterprises.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Covers professional relationships between and among healthcare enterprises and the differences and between direct employment and independent practitioners with privileges when looking at; credentialing, disciplinary issues, and the Healthcare Quality Improvement Act. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6152. HIPAA/Patient Privacy.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Explores the federal regulatory scheme designed to protect the privacy and security of health information. Topics covered include; Entities and information to which the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 HIPAA) applies, HIPAA compliance and enforcement, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6153. Overview of Public Health Care Programs.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Will cover public health insurance (including Medicare, Medicaid, government hospitals, and other government-financed health programs). In addition, this course will cover what treatment is required of anyone coming into an Emergency department by the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA). (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6162. Health Information Management.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Will cover health information law and policy as it pertains to data security and privacy of electronic health records in the United States. Students will examine how individual health information is collected, maintained, and transferred in this electronic information age, and the ramifications when such information is improperly protected, stolen, and misused. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6172. Health Care Transactions and Contracts.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. This course covers the business, regulatory, and legal issues that arise in healthcare business transactions: asset sales, mergers, joint ventures, procurement contracts, and the application of tax laws to transactions. In addition, this course will cover the fundamental principles of contract law and the role of valuations in healthcare transactions. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6173. Fraud and Abuse Claims.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Will cover federal physician self-referral law, fraud and abuse law. Students will learn the statutes, regulations, and advisory opinions that define the parameters of physician referrals and anti-kickback laws, analyzing case studies for those issues. Students will familiarize themselves with the False Claims Act and other laws, regulations, and government regulatory actions designed to combat false claims and fraudulent activities. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6182. Coding and Billing.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Provides students with working knowledge of the business side of medicine: medical record documentation, coding and billing. This course will provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the legal role of the medical record, specifically in the context of obligations for the organization of the medical record and its support for reimbursement of services. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6183. Experiencing a Simulated Investigation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Prepares students for experiencing an investigation including how to prepare for potential investigation and how to respond to and cooperate with an investigation. A portion of the course will involve live simulation exercises. (F, Sp, Su)

LSH 6192. Anti-Trust Issues in Healthcare Delivery.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Program. Focuses on antitrust issues relevant to health care providers: hospital and physician mergers, virtual mergers and joint ventures; exclusive contracts and other medical staff exclusion issues; covenants not to compete; managed care plans; antitrust defenses such as state action, nonprofit, learned profession, efficiencies, failing business, etc.; and federal and state healthcare antitrust regulatory efforts, including healthcare collaborative guidelines. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5101. Introduction to Legal Research.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Provides students with an understanding of the most efficient and cost-effective tools and methods for researching U.S. and tribal law. It includes lecture sessions, hands-on research training, and practical exercises across a range of subject areas for both print and electronic sources. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5603. Native American Natural Resources.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Covers basic doctrines of Indian law and a variety of issues relating to tribal interests in and jurisdiction over environmental resources. Topics includes tribal rights to land; land use and environmental protection in Indian country; economic and natural resource development issues; hunting and fishing rights; and international perspectives on indigenous resources. Consider the roles of tribal, federal, and state governments. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5613. Criminal Jurisdiction in Indian Country.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Traces the development the rules governing the exercise of criminal jurisdiction in Indian Country by three sovereigns: federal government, state government, and tribal government. Materials examined include historical treaties, major federal statutes, and U.S. Supreme Court decisions. Students should finish the course with the ability to understand, analyze and contribute meaningfully to discussions regarding criminal jurisdiction problems in Indian Country. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5622. History of Federal Indian Law and Policy I.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Traces the development of British colonial and United States policy towards indigenous peoples in North America from the Seventeenth Century through the major policy initiatives of the Nineteenth Century. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5623. Religion, Culture & Indian Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines the roles of law and policy on Native American religious and cultural practice. Explores issues relating to tribal interests and jurisdiction over Native religion and culture including information concerning preservation, restoration, and destruction of sacred sites and indigenous remains, laws and practices pertaining to species protection and sacred species, institutionalized persons, entheogens, protection of cultural and intellectual resources. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5632. History of Federal Indian Law and Policy II.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Traces the development of British colonial and United States policy towards indigenous peoples in North America from the major policy initiatives of the Nineteenth Century to the present day. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5643. International Indigenous Peoples Law.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with LSIB 5643) Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Explores the development of international law rules relating to the rights of indigenous peoples from the early 20th Century through the present, focusing on modern international institutions and instruments including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5653. Civil Jurisdiction in Indian Country.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Addresses regulatory and adjudicatory authority, including the history of Federal-Tribal relations, tribal recognition, the scope of Indian Country, and tribal sovereignty as it relates to civil jurisdiction. State-Tribal struggles over jurisdiction, recent Supreme Court diminishment of tribal authority, environmental regulations and the tribal role within the system of cooperative federalism are also examined. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5663. Federal Indian Water Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Explores the context, decisional and statutory law, and overarching polices that shape water law. Examines foundations in both federal Indian law and basic principles of water law, including relevant substantive and procedural law, and mechanics and social issues relating to water resource management. Also, explores state and federal powers and roles in relation to American Indian tribes and water resources. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5673. Indian Gaming Laws & Regulations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines litigation, history of tribal gaming, critical rulings on tribal/state compacting, and scope of gaming conflicts. Explores tribal compacting experiences around country focusing on Oklahoma tribes and Oklahoma Model Gaming Compact of 2004. Distinguishes regulatory roles of tribes, states, and feds. Explores differences in Class II and III gaming, regulations and disputes. Explains financing and development of tribal gaming facilities. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5693. The Indian Child Welfare Act & Family Law in Indian Country.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Indian Child Welfare Act, passed by Congress (1978), grants tribes and parents of Indian children special rights within state court systems. ICWA raises significant issues for courts, and often serve as the flashpoint of tribal/state disputes. Student will understand the clash of sovereigns and the state laws involving children. Covers requirements of ICWA and varying ways states have interpreted them. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5723. Tribal Courts in Indian Country.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. This course examines the relationship between Tribal Nations and the three main sovereigns: Federal government, state governments, and tribal governments. Students will understand, analyze and discuss the importance of tribal court to tribal sovereignty, the tribal people, and to specific tribal cultures. (F, Sp, Su)

LSI 5911. Introduction to the American Legal System.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines U.S. courts, role of Constitution in U.S., and foundations of United States law. The goal is to introduce students to distinctive aspects and/or fundamental principles in U.S. law. This course explains how law functions with various aspects of our society and how it plays an increasingly significant role in conflict resolution, civil liberties and equality, contracts, and property agreements. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5002. Sources of International Law-MLS.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to Masters of Legal Studies in International Business Law Program. Teaches students the core skills of finding and using various sources of international and transnational business law including bilateral and multinational treaties, uniform international rules and principles, decisions of international and transnational adjudicatory organizations, and European Union directives and decisions. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5012. Introduction to Legal Studies.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. A general introduction to the nature and structure of national, international, and transnational legal systems. It introduces the students to the common law and civil law legal systems as well as the international and transnational organizations and structures of international and transnational business law such as the European Union, NAFTA, the WTO, UNCITRAL. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5112. International Payment Systems.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Students will examine some of the key international payment systems: Letters of Credit, wire transfers, international netting, and the SWIFT system. The main themes will include risks associated with fraudulent transactions and the allocation of credit risk throughout the payment systems. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5113. Comparative Corporate Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines the differences between corporate law in civil law countries and corporate law in the Anglo-American world. Aspects of corporate law to be compared include: the formation process, capital requirements and distributions, duties and liabilities of management, the powers of the general meeting vis-a-vis the powers of the management bodies, minority shareholders' protection, and creditor protection. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5122. Combating International Corruption.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Introduction to the principles of US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) and the OECD Convention on Combatting Bribery of Foreign Public Officials in International Business Transactions other transparency initiatives, which is important for any business with an overseas presence. It is practically focused on the need for compliance planning and transaction screening and reporting to prevent violating the FCPA provisions. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5123. European Union Business and Competition Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Provides an introduction to the subject of European Law. Students will learn the unique structure of the EU and the Common Market including how directives are made and implemented. It will then focus on a few specific areas of law including: free movement of goods, employment, taxation, and competition law. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5132. International Sanctions Regimes.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Provides an overview of the international sanctions regimes. It explores the processes by which UN, other multilateral, and unilateral sanctions are imposed and how sanctions impact the way business is conducted. A few country specific sanctions provisions will be explored. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5133. International Sales and other Business Transactions.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Focuses on the legal aspects of commercial activity that takes place in two or more countries. It will examine the sale of goods and services across national boundaries, licensing of intellectual property, foreign investment, and the core principles of international taxation and antitrust law. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5143. International Commercial and Investment Arbitration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines international arbitration as a system of private justice, focusing on the five building blocks of international arbitration - the agreement to arbitrate, arbitral rules of procedure, international conventions on the enforcement of arbitration agreements, national arbitration laws, and relevant decisions of national courts - and comparing arbitration with other forms of dispute resolution. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5153. International Business, Human Rights, and Corporate Responsibility.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Looks at the appropriate role and responsibilities of multinational corporations with respect to human rights. Will examine the United Nations (UN) and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines for business and human rights as well as the UN's decision to draft a treaty on this topic as well as national regulations and potential litigation risks. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 5643. International Indigenous Peoples Law.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with LSI 5643) Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Explores the development of international law rules relating to the rights of indigenous peoples from the early 20th Century through the present, focusing on modern international institutions and instruments including the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 6100. Selected Legal Problems.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Involved current legal problems. Subject matter and course credit will be included with the enrollment instructions. (F, Sp)

LSIB 6112. International Finance: Capital Markets.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines laws and institutions governing global capital markets, as well as the applicability of US Securities regulation abroad. The major markets and exchanges covered include London, Europe, and Hong Kong. It will examine attempts at and challenges to international harmonization. In addition to primary capital market transactions, it will also consider cross boarder public merger and takeover regulations and practices. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 6113. International Trade and Investment.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines regulation of trans-border trade on a global level. Explores laws and institutions which regulate the flow of international trade and foreign investment. Major institutions covered include World Trade Organization, International Monetary Fund, International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (World Bank), European Union, North American Free Trade Agreement, and Asian regional institutions. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 6122. International Finance: Banking and Structured Finance.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Covers the international regulation of the market for bank financing. Principles of capital adequacy, safety and soundness, and systemic risk will be introduced. The process of syndication and global structured finance will also be explored. Finally, the course will introduce the topic of anti-money laundering regulation. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIB 6132. International Energy.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Provides a broad review of international energy resources and production. It covers energy sources and distribution, including hydrocarbons and renewables; administrative organization and applicable legislative/regulatory framework; in addition to an overview of climate change and related international goals, and the effect of energy on indigenous populations, human rights, and environment. (F, Sp, Su)

LSO 5112. Foundations of Contract Law for the Energy Industry.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Explores the formation, drafting, interpretation and enforceability of contractual promises. Subjects include contract formation, performance, termination of contracts, material breach, remedies for breach of contract, mistake and excuse for nonperformance, statute of frauds, interpretation of contract language, conditions, assignment and delegation, and third party beneficiaries. (F, Sp)

LSO 5232. Introduction to Property Law and Natural Resources.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Provides an introduction to basic property concepts relevant for the oil and gas and energy industries, including: adverse possession; estates in land; mineral title, surface title, co-ownership, non-possessory interests (including easements, real covenants and equitable servitudes). (F, Sp)

LSO 6352. Negotiations, Communication, and Ethics.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Teaches effective negotiation and communication skills through a series of mock negotiation exercises. In addition, this course will discuss ethical dilemmas raised in the oil and gas industry. (F, Sp)

LSO 6501. Introduction to Petroleum Engineering and Geo-Sciences.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Presents an overview of the production life cycle from discovery to development and production of oil and gas. The course examines the different roles of the key players in each stage of this process. (F, Sp)

LSO 6502. Project Economics and Finance.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Introduces the economics and finance of capital-intensive projects, especially those involving power generation, public infrastructure, and extractive industries. Students will receive a broad overview of the project finance market, showing a typical project finance deal and the main players involved. The costs, benefits, and risks associated with project finance are also described. (F, Sp)

LSO 6511. Midstream Oil and Gas Law.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Provides an overview and an examination of the legal issues facing the midstream oil and gas industry. The midstream industry provides the infrastructure necessary to gather, process, transport, store and market crude oil, natural gas, natural gas liquids, and refined products. (F, Sp)

LSO 6512. Oil and Gas Law.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Nature of property interests in oil and gas; conveyancing of interests in oil and gas; legal interests created by oil and gas leases; validity of leases; habendum, drilling, and rental clauses; assignment of interests of lessor and lessee; rents and royalties; and conservation of oil and gas. (F, Sp)

LSO 6513. Oil and Gas Regulatory Practice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Offers a practical skills approach to oil and gas practice. This course will examine the regulation of oil and gas exploration, development, and production, including conservation law designed to prevent waste and protect correlative rights. The class will address securing a drilling permit, settling surface damages, well spacing and density. (F, Sp)

LSO 6522. Legal Drafting.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. How does one discover a client's objectives and then translate them into legal text (contracts, etc.) that has the best chance of accomplishing what the client wants? This skills course considers many different forms of legal drafting, focusing primarily on legal work intended for oil and gas contracts and surface-related agreement drafting. (F, Sp)

LSO 6531. Legal Research for the Energy Industry.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Students will be instructed on how to conduct energy-related research using a variety of sources, but especially using online resources. (F, Sp)

LSO 6553. Oil and Gas Contracts.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examination of specific provisions in contracts prevalent in the oil and gas industry for exploration, production, and development of oil and gas properties and for investment; the nature of the relationships created by such contracts; the rights and duties of the parties; income tax consequences of particular contracts. (F, Sp)

LSO 6563. Mineral Title Examination.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines the study of the relevant law relating to and the preparation of a drilling title opinion and a division order title opinion in Oklahoma, Texas, and other states. (F, Sp)

LSO 6572. Real Estate Transactions.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. A study of the terms and legal issues involved in drafting, executing, enforcing, and recording real estate contracts, including obtaining and evaluating title evidence, different types of deeds, and basic financing. (F, Sp)

LSO 6573. Oil & Gas Development of Public Lands.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to the Master of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines the oil and gas leasing and development of onshore federal, state, and Indian lands. Explores the leasing of railroad rights of way and lands belonging to local governments. (F, Sp)

LSO 6581. Water Law for the Energy Industry.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. The system of water rights as related for energy extraction and development, including riparian, appropriation, and prescriptive rights; stream, surface, and ground water; transfer and termination of rights; injuries caused by water; development of water supplies; federal-state, interstate, and intrastate conflicts; water pollution control; federal and Indian rights; and federal water resource problems. (F, Sp)

LSO 6592. Oil and Gas Environmental Law.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Admission to Masters of Legal Studies and/or Master of Laws Programs. Examines federal and state environmental laws that affect oil and gas lease transactions, drilling and completion operations, and production activities. (F, Sp)

Faculty

Last Name First/Middle Name Middle init. OU Service start Title(s), date(s) appointed Degrees Earned, Schools, Dates Completed
Aswad Evelyn M 2013 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2013; HERMAN G. KAISER CHAIR IN INTERNATIONAL LAW, 2013 JD, Georgetown Univ, 1995; BS, Georgetown Univ, 1992
Backus Mary Sue 2010 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2010; ROBERT GLENN RAPP FOUNDATION PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2013; HUGH ROFF PROFESSOR IN LAW, 2018 JD, College of William And Mary, 2001; MA, Univ of Alaska, Anchorage, 1990
Barnes Brenda H 2012 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2012 JD, Univ of Oklahoma, 1999; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1996
Bogan Donald T 2005 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2005; FRANK ELKOURI AND EDNA ASPER ELKOURI PROFESSOR IN LAW, 2015 JD, Wake Forest Univ, 1979; BA, Brown Univ, 1974
Burstein Sarah 2012 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2018 JD, Univ of Chicago, 2007; BA, Iowa State Univ, 2004
Cleveland Steven J 2008 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2008; ALFRED P. MURRAH PROFESSORSHIP OF LAW, 2018; CO-CHAIR, LAW DEPARTMENT, 2018; THOMAS P. HESTER PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2018 JD, Georgetown Univ, 1998; BA, Univ of California-Los Angeles, 1990
Coats Andrew M 1996 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 1996; SAMUEL ROBERTS NOBLE FOUNDATION PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 1996; ARCH B. AND JOANNE GILBERT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2010; DEAN EMERITUS, COLLEGE OF LAW, 2010 JD, Univ of Oklahoma, 1963; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1957
Dewalt Erin L 2012 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2012 JD, Univ of Oklahoma, 2009; BS, St. Gregory's Univ, 2005
Ehrman Monika 2013 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2013; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ENERGY MANAGEMENT, 2018 LLM, Yale Univ, 2014; JD, Southern Methodist Univ, 2005; BS, Univ of Alberta, 2000
Forman Jonathan B 1985 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 1991; KENNETH E. MCAFEE CENTENNIAL CHAIR IN LAW 2018 MA, George Washington Univ, 1983; JD, Univ of Michigan, 1978; MA, Univ of Iowa, 1975; BA, Northwestern Univ, 1973
Fox Darin K 2005 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2011 MS, Univ of Illinois, 1993; JD, Univ of Oklahoma, 1992; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1989
Gensler Steven S 2005 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2005; PRESIDENT'S ASSOCIATES PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2006; GENE AND ELAINE EDWARDS FAMILY CHAIR IN LAW, 2018 JD, Univ of Illinois, 1992; BS, Univ of Illinois, 1988
Guzman Katheleen G 1993 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2000; MAPCO/WILLIAMS PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2000; EARL SNEED CENTENNIAL PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2013 LLM, Yale Univ, 1992; JD, Univ of Arkansas, 1991; BA, Univ of Arkansas, 1987
Harroz Joseph 1994 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2010; FENELON BOESCHE CHAIR OF LAW, 2010 JD, Georgetown Univ, 1992; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1989
Helton Taiawagi 2001 ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES, 2006; PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2008 LLM, Yale Univ, 2001; JD, Univ of Tulsa, 1999; BA, Ohio State Univ, 1995
Henderson Stephen E 2011 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2011; JUDGE HASKELL A. HOLLOMAN PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2015 JD, Yale Univ, 1999; BS, Univ of California Davis, 1995
Johnson Catherine F 2012 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2012 JD, Univ of California Berkeley, 2000; BA, Wesleyan Univ, 1997
Johnson Eric E 2017 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2018 JD, Harvard, 2000; BA, Univ of Texas, 1994
Knippenberg F. S 1990 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 1992; FLOYD AND MARTHA NORRIS CHAIR IN LAW, 2005 LLM, Temple Univ, 1987; JD, Univ of Tulsa, 1980; BA, Univ of Dayton, 1974
McCall Brian M 2006 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2012; ORPHA AND MAURICE MERRILL PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2013; ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, LAW CENTER, 2014; ADJUNCT PROFESSOR OF LEGAL ASSISTANT EDUCATION, 2015 JD, Univ of Pennsylvania, 1997; MA, King's College Univ of London, 1992; BA, Yale Univ, 1991
Michalski Roger M 2015 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2015 JD, Univ of California Berkeley, 2011; PhD, Univ of Michigan, 2009; BA, Univ of Rochester, 2002
Mortazavi Melissa D 2015 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2015 JD, Univ of California Berkeley, 2005; BA, Cornell Univ, 2001;
Mullins Gail E 2002 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2006; DIRECTOR, EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING, 2015; DIRECTOR, LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING PROGRAM, 2015; CO-CHAIR LAW DEPARTMENT, 2018 JD, Univ of Oklahoma, 1993; BS, Oklahoma State Univ, 1976
Nicholson Daniel R 2006 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2006 JD, Univ of Oklahoma, 2000; BA, Phillips Univ, 1992
Odinet Christopher K 2018 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2018 JD, Louisiana State Univ, 2010; BA, Louisiana State Univ, 2007
Pepper Amelia S 2006 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2006 JD, Univ of Oklahoma, 1987
Richter Liesa L 2009 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2009; THOMAS P. HESTER PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2010; IAM J. ALLEY PROFESSOR IN LAW, 2015 JD, Univ of Florida, 1995; BS, Univ of Florida, 1992
Robertson Lindsay G 2003 SAM K. VIERSEN FAMILY FOUNDATION PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2002; PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2003; CHICKASAW NATION ENDOWED CHAIR IN NATIVE AMERICAN LAW, 2015 PhD, Univ of Virginia, 1997; JD, Univ of Virginia, 1986; MA, Univ of Virginia, 1986; AB, Davidson College, 1981
Schmook Zachary M 2017 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2017 JD, Washington Univ, 2007; BS, Univ of Maryland, 2004
Shaner Megan W 2011 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2017 JD, Univ of Iowa, 2005; BS, Drake Univ, 2002
Sheley Erin L 2018 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2018 PhD, Univ of Iowa, 1981; MA, Univ of Illinois, 1977; AB, Clark, 1974
Smothermon Connie S 2004 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2006; ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, LEGAL WRITING AND RESEARCH, 2010; DIRECTOR, COMPETITIONS, 2010; DIRECTOR, EXTERNSHIPS, 2015 JD, Oklahoma City University, 1996; BA, Univ of Oklahoma 1981
Tabb William M 1990 JUDGE FRED DAUGHERTY CHAIR IN LAW, 2009; DAVID ROSS BOYD PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2009 LLM, Illinois Univ, 1987; JD, Univ of Arkansas, 1982; MA, Univ of Arkansas, 1976; BA, Univ of Arkansas, 1974
Taylor Rebekah C 2017 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2017 PhD, Southern Illinois, 1987; MS, North Florida, 1979; BS, Florida Tech, 1975
Tepker Harry F 1981 PROFESSOR OF LAW, 1987; FLOYD AND IRMA CALVERT CHAIR IN LAW AND LIBERTY, 1998 JD, Duke Univ, 1976; BA, Claremont Men's College, 1973
Thai Joseph T 2007 PRESIDENT'S ASSOCIATES PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2007; PROFESSOR OF LAW, 2009; GLENN R. WATSON CENTENNIAL CHAIR IN LAW, 2013 JD, Harvard Univ, 1998; AB, Harvard Univ, 1995