College of Professional and Continuing Studies

McCarter Hall

1700 Asp Avenue
Norman, OK 73072-6405

Phone: (405) 325-4414
Toll free: (800) 522-0772 ext. 4414

College Website:
http://pacs.ou.edu

Administrative Officers

Gregg Garn, Ph.D., Interim Dean and Vice President of Online Learning
David Babb, Ph.D., Associate Dean

General Information

Mission and Description of the College

The College of Professional and Continuing Studies (PACS) was established in 1960 to serve the higher education needs of adult and non-traditional students. The college’s mission is to provide access to transformational, world-class University of Oklahoma degrees, certifications, and programs for a diverse group of learners. The college is best characterized by the populations it serves, as well as the specialized programming it offers. Primarily focusing on the higher education needs of place-bound working adults, military-connected personnel, and those seeking specialized study in selected professional areas, the college offers a variety of undergraduate degrees, professional development courses, and lifelong learning programs. To facilitate understanding of the complex world in which we live and building on its historical roots, the college emphasizes a holistic approach to learning, focuses on the immediate application of learning to one’s life and work, promotes lifelong learning opportunities, and encourages the work of active citizenship. While its programs were originally developed for adult and non-traditional students, many of the seminars, colloquia, and conferences offered by the college also serve students enrolled in conventional academic programs, as well as the general public.

Faculty and Leadership

The College of Professional and Continuing Studies utilizes a combination of its own departmental faculty, faculty from other University of Oklahoma colleges, and qualified practice professionals who serve as adjunct instructors to teach, advise, and mentor students. Faculty and instructors are invited to participate in the college's programs on the basis of their professionalism and commitment to the mission, values, and goals of the organization. Leadership for the College of Professional and Continuing Studies is vested in the Dean, Associate Dean, college faculty, and senior staff.

General University Policies

Students enrolled through the College of Professional and Continuing Studies are subject to the University of Oklahoma’s general policies, scholastic regulations, and standards as outlined in the University’s General Catalog. Questions concerning OU policies or procedures should be directed to the college.

Programs Offered

Programs Governed by PACS

Programs and Facilities

Campus-Affiliated Programs

OU Testing Center

Competency-based credit is available to students through the OU Testing Center, which offers College Level Examination Program (CLEP), Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education (DANTES) Standardized Subject Tests (DSST), and institutionally developed Prior Learning Assessment exams. The Testing Center also offers the American College Testing (ACT) residual exam, Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), Graduate Record Exam (GRE), and the FAA Airman’s Knowledge Test. For more information about the OU Testing Center, email testing@ou.edu or call (405) 325-1921.

Developmental Studies

The Developmental Studies program is a partnership between the OU College of Professional and Continuing Studies and Rose State College. The program offers OU students a convenient way to strengthen their academic foundations prior to beginning University-level courses required in OU academic degrees. DMAT 0113, DMAT 0123, DENG 0113, and DRDG 0122 are offered as courses to assist students in assuring their readiness to succeed in regular University-level coursework. For more information on these programs, call (405) 325-5101.

Lifelong Learning Programs

Economic Development Institute

The OU Economic Development Institute (EDI) is the premier economic development program in the nation, with 60 years of experience providing professional economic developers with up-to-date knowledge and tools necessary to succeed in today’s constantly-changing environment. More than 6,000 professionals have completed the full certification course, widely recognized throughout the profession. The OU EDI experience is designed to immediately impact a participant’s professional career through the usage of best practices. It also provides all coursework needed to sit for the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) CEcD certification exam. Please email edi@ou.edu or call (405) 325-3136 for additional information.

Lean Institute

The OU Lean Institute (OULI) offers a wide variety of classes, certifications and coaching in Lean/Six Sigma, Lean Leadership, and Business Culture Transformation. Since 2004, The Institute has served a broad spectrum of private sector businesses, governmental agencies, and non-profits, saving money and other resources by improving efficiency and reducing waste. The Lean Institute teaches through project-based training, with students learning by making real world improvements in their companies and organizations. Our instructors, who are also expert field practitioners, work with students and clients on-site, in person and remotely. Participants in our training programs receive professional certificates from the University of Oklahoma and have the opportunity to complete white, green, and black belts in Lean Six Sigma. Our participants also acquire continuing education units (CEUs) necessary for many professional licenses. Successfully educating thousands in its nearly 20 years, the Lean Institute trains and works with clients in virtually all fields including transactional, service, manufacturing, health care, military, government, banking, energy, and education. Please email lean@ou.edu or call (405) 325-3136 for more information.

Laurance Reid Gas Conditioning Conference (LRGCC)

The Laurance Reid Gas Conditioning Conference (LRGCC) has been presented by the University of Oklahoma since 1951. The LRGCC has a worldwide reputation as the principal forum for preparing and purifying natural gases and other fuels. It is a crucial conference for professionals in the gas processing, conditioning, and sweetening industries. The program provides technological advances, theoretical breakthroughs, and current research in the field. For more information about this conference, email lmartinez@ou.edu. 

Other Energy & Engineering Programs

The College of Professional and Continuing Studies offers additional niche training seminars and courses that include the annually held Corrosion Control Course and Gas Compressor Short Course, as well as the monthlyBlowout Prevention School. For more information on these programs, call (405) 325-3136. 

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of Oklahoma is dedicated to promoting lifelong learning and personal growth of older adults, age 50+, through a variety of noncredit courses. Initially, these programs took the form of travel study opportunities and Elderhostel courses. In the 1980s, OU developed a dedicated learning unit to serve the learning needs of mature adults, which was known as Senior Adult Services (SAS). In 2006, SAS received a grant from The Bernard Osher Foundation in California to become one of 125 Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes in America. The grant allows the program to do more of what it does best — serve Oklahoma’s mature learners. In 2010, the program was endowed with a $1 million gift from The Bernard Osher Foundation to sustain OLLI operations. Today, OLLI at OU provides educational and enrichment opportunities for adult learners through both the aforementioned avenues, including Mornings with the Professor, Senior Seminars, and invitations to special events. For more information about OLLI, email olli@ou.edu or call (405) 325-3488.

Precollegiate Programs

OU Precollegiate Programs provides academic and leadership programs for K-12 students, through a variety of academic enrichment activities. The program reaches 3,000 youth each year through academic programs, including summer academies funded by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education in STEAM fields, NSF-funded summer research opportunities for high school students, Mini College summer camp for elementary school students, and Model United Nations of the Southwest. Precollegiate Programs has a long tradition of service to the broader community and serves as a way to engage K-12 youth in educational opportunities on a university campus and encourage them to engage on a path to higher education. For more information about OU Precollegiate Programs, email precollegiateprograms@ou.edu or call (405) 325-6897.

Thurman J. White Forum Building and Conference Services

As an integral part of the College of Professional and Continuing Studies, the Thurman J. White Forum hosts over 3200 events annually for more than 108,000 attendees. Participants come from across the United States and beyond to attend conferences, meetings, courses, and training offered in a variety of in-person and virtual formats.

The Forum Conference Services team provides turn-key professional meeting support to University and non-University groups. Available services include event planning, marketing, coordinating contracts with outside services, and online and on-site registration. OU Forum Conference Services also provides comprehensive on-site event management at the Forum Building, as well as other venues on the OU campus, hotels in Norman, and nearby cities. 

The Forum Building is equipped with a full complement of A/V and meeting equipment in all meeting spaces, including ceiling mounted projectors and screens, sound-systems, laptops, wi-fi, whiteboards, and lecterns. Staff are available on-site during all event hours to provide technical and logistical support. Forum Conference Services also offers beverage service and can arrange for event catering needs.

For more information about Forum Conference Services, please email conferenceservices@ou.edu or call (405) 325-7378.

Undergraduate Study

Goals of Undergraduate Programs

The undergraduate curriculum offered by the College of Professional and Continuing Studies (PACS) is designed to help students gain greater self-awareness and realization of their potential in both work and life contexts, with a focus on helping them become ready to excel in some of the most in-demand fields in the region.

While pursuing their degrees, students will not only become well versed in their chosen areas of study, they will master the skills necessary to excel in the workforce, setting them up for career advancement and higher salaries.

Online Coursework

The college offers its undergraduate degree programs in a 100% online format. All courses are considered asynchronous, meaning that students are not required to be online at the same time as their professors and classmates. Online courses are typically offered in five, eight-week academic sessions throughout the year — two sessions during the fall, two during the spring, and one during the summer. Students may choose to enroll in two courses (six hours) during each of the available academic sessions, allowing them to make full-time progress toward completion of their degree.

Online courses are provided through the University of Oklahoma’s learning management system, Canvas, which can be accessed anywhere with an internet connection utilizing a smart phone, tablet, laptop, or desktop computer. The Canvas classroom environment facilitates student learning by providing a single location to access online lectures, learning materials, reading assignments, and discussion topics. Canvas also allows students to upload their assignments for instructor assessment, grading and feedback. 

Admission to the College

Individuals wishing to pursue an undergraduate degree from the College must be fully admitted to the University of Oklahoma before beginning their coursework.

Individuals applying for admission to the PACS Adult Degree Completion (ADC) Program must be 25 years of age or older at the start of their first semester. They should also have completed at least 60 hours of letter-graded college credit with a 2.0 GPA or higher.

Applications to the ADC program can be completed at https://attend.ou.edu/. No application fee is required.

Students must submit official college transcripts from all previously attended academic institutions. International students must also demonstrate English proficiency.

Official transcripts must be enclosed in a sealed envelope and mailed directly from the institutions you attended to the following address:

OU College of Professional and Continuing Studies
Office of Admissions, Registration, and Records
1610 Asp Avenue, Suite 108
Norman, OK 73072-6405

Transcripts can also be submitted electronically to pacsugadmissions@ou.edu directly by the institutions you attended. 

Application deadlines and additional information about the ADC application process can be found at the following location: https://www.ou.edu/online/admissions/undergraduate. Applications for admission can be submitted at any time of year, and students are encouraged to apply as early as possible to complete the admission process in advance of anticipated attendance.

Questions concerning admissions should be directed to:

Phone: (405) 325-1062
Toll-free: (800) 522-4389
Email: pacsinfo@ou.edu

Student Status and Enrollment

Current student status is effective for one year from the time of admission. If an admitted student does not enroll within one year, an application for readmission must be filed.

PACS reserves the right to cancel any course prior to its starting date if the course does not have sufficient enrollments.

Fee Structure and Payment

For the 2023-2024 academic year, all students registered in the PACS Adult Degree Completion Program will be charged a flat programmatic rate of $500 per credit hour.

All university-related charges are billed through OU Bursar Services. Payment options are available and will be described in the electronic bill students receive from the Bursar. For additional billing information, please contact the Student Financial Center at (405) 325-9000 or sfc@ou.edu.

Other Educational Expenses

In addition to the programmatic fee charged per credit hour, students will be financially responsible for obtaining textbooks and any other required study materials. Students will also assume responsibility for travel and living expenses associated with attending any optional on-site seminars, as well as any material or field trip fees associated with these optional learning activities.

Refund Policy

A student withdrawing completely from a PACS program may be entitled to a refund. Students should contact their academic advisor for the refund policies associated with their program of study.

Financial Aid / Tuition Assistance

Most PACS undergraduate degree-seeking students are eligible to receive financial aid by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). It takes a minimum of eight weeks to process financial aid materials, so students are encouraged to begin the financial aid process at least two months before the start of an academic session. For information concerning any financial aid matters, please contact PACS Financial Aid Services:

Phone: (405) 325-2929
Email: onlineaid@ou.edu
Website: https://pacs.ou.edu/tuition-financial-aid/  

Some governmental agencies provide tuition assistance and other support programs for their employees. Likewise, many business and industrial corporations have available educational assistance programs. PACS students are urged to explore these types of assistance. Students who receive financial support from their employer are responsible for ensuring that any necessary authorization forms are forwarded to PACS in a timely fashion. Students are also responsible for knowing and meeting any criteria in respect to their enrollment status and their financial support.

Military Education Assistance

Tuition Assistance

Military-connected students using Tuition Assistance should begin by contacting their Education Officer for assistance. For any questions or concerns about current or future PACS enrollments, contact: va-militarybilling@ou.edu.

Veteran Benefits

Veterans and their dependents may be eligible to use US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) education benefits for PACS programs. For more information, visit the VA’s website, or contact OU Veteran Student Services

Scholarships

The College of Professional and Continuing Studies provides a number of scholarship opportunities for undergraduate through alumni contributions to the University of Oklahoma. The college offers Start-Up Scholarships each semester for newly matriculated students entering the Adult Degree Completion Program. Additionally, a variety of alumni and named (endowed) scholarships are awarded to undergraduate students who are eligible based on the guidelines provided for each scholarship.

For many years, the College of Professional and Continuing Studies has also administered the Osher Scholarship program, which provides funding for undergraduate students returning to college who have at least a five-year gap in their college enrollment history and are working to complete their first bachelor’s degree. In 2013, the college applied for and received a $1 million endowment gift to permanently endow the Osher scholarship that is administered through the college. Criteria and procedures related to PACS scholarships are available on the PACS website.

PACS students may also qualify for some University scholarships in addition to those offered by the college. Students should visit the OU Centralized Academic Scholarship Hub (CASH) to review available scholarship opportunities.

University Services and Opportunities

PACS students have the same rights and responsibilities as other University students with respect to participation in most University programs and services, such as the Scholar-Leadership Enrichment Program, athletic events, museum access, cultural events, and other campus activities.

Some services for which traditional students pay additional semester-based fees, such as Goddard Health Center and Sarkey's Fitness Center, may be available to PACS students for a usage or service charge.

Grading System

Most courses offered by PACS are letter-graded (A-F) and utilize the grade point system (A=4, B=3, C=2, D=1, F=0).

Some independent study courses and specially offered seminars may be S/U graded (satisfactory/ unsatisfactory). In these cases, a grade of ‘S’ at the undergraduate level signifies that work was completed at the ‘D’ level or better and is necessary for receiving credit for a non-letter-graded course.

Graduation

Students will become graduation candidates upon completion of all requirements for the degree they are pursuing. All OU students must apply for graduation. Please visit the OU Graduation Office website for deadlines, procedures, and details about convocations and graduation receptions.   

Degrees are conferred by the University each year in December, May, and August. PACS commencement ceremonies are held in-person on the OU campus every May. 

Minimum Requirements for Graduation

  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0
  • At least 30 hours earned from the University of Oklahoma
  • At least 40 upper-division hours earned
  • At least 60 hours earned from a four-year, baccalaureate-granting institution
  • Completion of all general education requirements specified for the degree
  • Completion of all major course requirements with a ‘C’ or higher (or an ‘S’, if enrolled in an S/U graded course). Major course requirements cannot be taken as Pass/Fail
  • Completion of additional free electives with a passing grade, so the total number of credit hours earned meets the minimum required for the degree being pursued

Preparation for Graduate Study

All PACS undergraduate degree programs satisfy the baccalaureate degree requirement for admission to the OU Graduate College and most other graduate institutions. Some graduate programs, however, may require the completion of specific courses for full graduate standing in their major and/or minor fields of study. It is the important to inquire and learn of specific curricular and admission requirements before making application to a graduate program at OU or elsewhere, and it is the student’s responsibility to do so for any graduate program to which the student wishes to apply.

Awards and Recognition

PACS students and faculty are eligible to participate in recognition and award programs offered by the university and college. These awards are supported through gifts to the University of Oklahoma Foundation.

Each fall semester, one PACS bachelor’s student is recognized as the college’s outstanding senior in the OU Parent’s Association award program. During the spring semester, an outstanding bachelor’s graduate receives the Jesse E. Burkett Award, named for an early college administrator. The George Henderson Leadership Award is also awarded each spring, recognizing a bachelor’s student who has displayed outstanding leadership ability in the college's undergraduate Organizational Leadership program. Each may, the college also selects a Banner Carrier to represent the college in convocation and commencement activities.

Faculty awards include the Kenneth E. Crook Award and the Rufus G. Hall Faculty Achievement Award, both named in honor of faculty founders of the college’s original degree programs. The Superior Teaching Award is presented to the faculty member who best demonstrates superior teaching. Faculty awardees are selected for their teaching excellence and meritorious service to the college.

Courses

LSAL 2700. Topics in Administrative Leadership.1-9 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine credit hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to Administrative Leadership. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of Administrative Leadership. (F, Sp, Su)

LSAL 3243. Lean Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: None. This course experience will give students an opportunity to examine their current perceptions of what makes for an effective leader in business/life situations and compare these perceptions with the primary mission of a Lean Leader. (Sp)

LSAL 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

LSAL 3533. Adapting To Changing Marketing Environments.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Focuses on innovative strategy planning that helps businesses survive in increasingly competitive markets. An analysis of the individual consumer as a problem solver who is influenced by psychological variables, social influences, and the purchase situation. Also studies the number, size, location, and buying behavior of various types of organizational customers, and logistics activities and how they provide time and place utility to improve value to the customer. (F, Sp, Su)

LSAL 4700. Advanced Topics in Administrative Leadership.1-9 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Investigation into problems of leadership not covered in existing courses, and utilizing an interdisciplinary approach. Will culminate in a written report of investigation. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of liberal studies. (F, Sp, Su)

LSAL 4920. Internship in Administrative Leadership.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Field experience in issues related to a student's area of study. Students will gain knowledge through experiential and on-the-job practice. (F, Sp, Su)

LSAL 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LSAL 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSAL 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSCJ 2700. Topics in Criminal Justice.1-9 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine credit hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to Criminal Justice. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of Criminal Justice. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 3233. Restorative Justice and Problem-Solving Courts.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from advisor. Exploration of the philosophies, principals and strategies of non-incarceration justice models that seek to rehabilitate offenders as well as reduce harm to society and victims. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 3243. Capital Punishment.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing, or permission from academic advisor. An exploration of historical, legal, ethical, and sociological aspects of capital punishment in the American experience. Topics include an examination of capital punishment as practiced from colonial times to present, the moral, legal, and political conflicts surrounding the American death penalty, the players and personalities in our capital punishment system, and representations of capital punishment in American culture. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 3333. Special Populations in Corrections.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. Introduction to the management challenges presented by special populations in the criminal justice system, including individuals with mental illness, addictions, the disabled and the elderly. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 3423. Computer Crime and Digital Investigation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. The course will examine the ways in which the digital world has changed legal concepts developed in the brick-and-mortar world. It will focus on cutting-edge legal issues related to cybercrime, obtaining digital evidence, privacy issues, and the intersection of these issues with civil liberties. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 3953. Prospectus-Writing for Criminal Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and LSTD 3003, or permission from advisor. Preparatory course for LSCJ 4953 focusing on research methods, critical evaluation of academic literature, identifying and developing research topics, and improving academic writing. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 4143. Drugs and Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Examines the impact of drug abuse on contemporary American society. Students learn about drug regulation and legal issues, how drugs affect the brain and shape behavior, and the various categories of drugs and their characteristics. Also focuses on drug abuse prevention, treating drug dependence, and law enforcement programs to address drugs in society. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 4233. Community Policing and Problem Solving.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. An introduction to the concept of community policing. Topics include an historic overview of policing in the US, the definition of and strategies used in community policing, and an exploration of challenges related to modern policing. Specific emphasis is placed on developing a tool set for law enforcement professionals to effectively lead police agencies into the future. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 4253. Corporate Security: Private Policing in the 21st Century.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. An examination of the operational aspects of private security and private forms of policing with particular emphasis towards how these functions relate to the broader public safety and homeland security landscape. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 4700. Advanced Topics in Criminal Justice.1-9 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to criminal justice. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor in specified areas of criminal justice. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 4920. Internship in Criminal Justice.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Field experience in issues related to a student's area of study. Students will gain knowledge through experiential and on-the-job practice. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 4943. Practicum in Criminal Justice Leadership - Self-Study.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Criminal Justice major with senior standing, retention GPA of 2.8 or higher, consent of the Criminal Justice Department Lead Faculty, and any additional criteria as specified by the internship manual. A comprehensive work experience that promotes essential knowledge, skills, and abilities needed to succeed in the field of criminal justice. Options include cooperative education, apprenticeships, extended job shadowing, internships, and other systematic, planned work experiences. Approval of work experience and number of credits to be earned is required. (F, Sp, Su)

LSCJ 4953. Capstone in Criminal Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing, LSTD 3003, and LSCJ 3953, or permission from advisor. Senior capstone course for criminal justice culminating in a scholarly paper focusing on a specialized topic or case study. Students will demonstrate mastery of research skills, critical and analytical thinking, academic writing, and programmatic knowledge. (F, Sp)

LSCJ 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LSCJ 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSCJ 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSIS 3433. Positives and False Positives: Identifying Archaeoastronomy Pseudoscience.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing or departmental permission. An introduction to the critical assessment of well-founded archaeoastronomy research in comparison with examples of popularized, but unsupported pseudoscience. (F, Sp)

LSIS 3473. Concepts and Methods for Astronomy in Culture.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing or departmental permission. This course focuses on the mechanics and methods of Cultural Astronomy and teaches proper data collection and publication. The underlying concepts of astronomy are introduced, and students are familiarized with research instruments such as sighting compasses, inclinometers, and theodolites. (F, Sp)

LSIS 4273. Understanding Educational Inequality in the U.S..3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. An examination of inequality within the American educational system from K-12 to higher education utilizing demographic data and analyzing current research on inequality based upon race, class, and gender. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 4283. Class and Economic Inequality in America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. An examination of how social class and socio-economic status (SES) operate in American society, including how media and research findings depict economic and social inequality in the United States. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 4303. Leadership and Governance for Social Entrepreneurs.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and LSAL 4163, or permission from PACS adviser. Explores leadership and governance through the perspective of organizational directors and corporate officers. Examines the processes of vision and mission casting, the setting of organizational direction, strategic planning through executive leadership, and the creation of founding documents and policies, all with the "design culture" in mind. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 4323. Budgeting for Social Entrepreneurs.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and LSAL 4163, or permission from PACS adviser. An exploration of economics, finance, and accounting from the perspective of commercial, nonprofit, community service and government service entities. Topics include basic accounting principles and the organization of financial statements, the fundamentals of financial investing, and the impact of interest on an organization's planning. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 4343. Case Studies in Social Entrepreneurship.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and LSAL 4163, or permission from PACS adviser. An exploration of social innovation and entrepreneurship presented through the historical examination of organizations that have utilized innovative methods and strategies to address social issues. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 4493. Contemporary Cultural Astronomy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course explores the many ways that astronomy plays a role in contemporary popular culture. It focuses on cultural examples and ways that people are inspired to react to astronomical events. It will instill an understanding of the effects of astronomy in culture and examines 21st Century ceremonies at sites such as Chaco Canyon, Machu Picchu, and Stonehenge. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 4700. Advanced Topics in Integrated Studies.1-9 Credit Hours.

1 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to interdisciplinary studies. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor in specified areas of integrated studies. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LSIS 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSIS 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSIS 5033. Ethnographic Field Research and Writing.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and LSTD 5003, or permission from graduate advisor. This course is an applied exploration of ethnographic research methodology through the development of a research question, immersion with a person or group of people, and completion of a final paper. Research skills addressed include participant-observation, listening, and critical thinking to develop both insider (emic) and outsider (etic) perspectives about sociological and cultural issues. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5093. Literature Review Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and LSTD 5003, or permission from graduate advisor. An applied exploration of the literature review process. Research skills practiced include: conducting academic literature searches, selecting sources, and documenting salient research related to a specified problem statement, background to the problem, research questions, and methodology. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5113. Critical Readings in Interdisciplinary Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and LSTD 5003 or permission from graduate advisor. The course is an analysis of critical texts in interdisciplinary research selected to expand creative thought and insight about the world in which we live and to provide a basis for future application of interdisciplinary study and reasoning. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5133. Advanced Interdisciplinary Foundations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, LSTD 5003 and LSTD 5013 or permission from graduate advisor. The course is an introduction of Thomas Kuhn's paradigm concept and its utility to both describe and guide knowledge acquisition in academic disciplines. Topics include the origins of the paradigm concept, the history and nature of scientific discovery, and the application of the paradigm concept to non-physical science academic disciplines. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5203. Diversity and Leadership in the United States.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and LSTD 5003, or permission from graduate advisor. Study of theories of leadership, identity, race, gender, disability, and oppression, issues of diversity and inclusion, challenges of underrepresented populations in the United States, and our responsibilities as leading diverse populations. Explores concepts, principles and case studies in ethics in the social science, particularly business ethics. Students examine core values of social conditioning, short-term profiteering, and the need for affiliation. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5233. Global Challenges in Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and LSTD 5003, or permission from graduate advisor. This course is an exploration of global leadership challenges based on individual, organizational, and multi-cultural scenarios. Issues examined include cultural diversity, the role of women in global context, social and economic disparities, development of a global mindset and global leaders, leading multinational and culturally diverse teams, and challenges of expatriate leadership. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5243. LGBTQ Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An exploration of LGBTQ leadership and associated issues in social, corporate, and political organizations. Topics include current and historical LGBTQ leaders, challenges associated with anti-LGBTQ bias, and implementation of diversity policies in organizations. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5253. Cultural Communication in Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and LSTD 5003, or permission from graduate advisor. A critical look at the value and necessity of cross-cultural communication in human development and interdisciplinary learning for quality interpersonal relations in communities and the workplace. The course will survey major theories of cultural communication and their intersections with race, gender, sexuality, and economics and will apply these concepts to real-world scenarios. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5263. Significance of Race in Society in the United States.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An exploration of the major theoretical perspectives used to explain racial issues in the United States. Identifies common racial/ethnic assumptions through an examination of how race or ethnicity is portrayed in the media with a comparison of current research findings relating to inequality. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5273. Overcoming Educational Inequality in the United States.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An examination of inequality within the American educational system from K-12 to higher education utilizing demographic data and analyzing current research on inequality based upon race, class, and gender. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5293. Exploring Race and Gender in Film.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An examination of race and gender in film during the post-civil rights period. Explores the effects of inequality and inclusiveness through the cinematic lens and analyzes the evolution of film relating to the depiction of race and gender issues. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5333. Volunteer Program Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, LSTD 5003 and LSTD 5013 or permission from the instructor. Introduction to volunteer program planning and development. Topics include assessing an organization's volunteer needs; planning and implementing recruiting, screening, placement, and training strategies; and mobilizing volunteers to meet organizational goals. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5373. Volunteer Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, LSTD 5003 and LSTD 5013 or permission from graduate advisor. Examination of the affective use of volunteers in a variety of organizations. Topics include motivating, monitoring, and supervising volunteers, and the retention of volunteers through appreciation and recognition strategies. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5403. Introduction and Research Methods for Archaeoastronomy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An introduction to the interdisciplinary research field of archaeoastronomy, the study of prehistoric astronomical knowledge. Topics include research methods, examples of astronomical associations with prehistoric architecture, and cultural insights of prehistoric peoples acquired through the field. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5423. Archaeoastronomy of Chaco Canyon and Cahokia.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. A review of archaeoastronomy research at two prehistoric cities in North America. Topics include the evidence for cosmological references in architecture and monumental architecture at Chaco Canyon and Cahokia and the foundational interpretive context provided by published historic period ethnographic information ("ethnoastronomy") for selected culture groups. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5433. Astronomy Traditions of the First Nations in the United States and Canada.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An exploration of indigenous astronomy and how it has been used by First Nations in the United States and Canada. Historical examples of how astral phenomena were interpreted and employed will be discussed. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5443. Latin American Archaeoastronomy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. An exploration of Mesoamerican and Latin American calendrical systems and the importance of astronomy to the design of cities and monumental structures. Surveyed sites include Chichen Itza, Teotihuacan, Tenochtitlan, and Cuzco. Emphasis is placed on the methods used to conduct archaeoastronomy research based on evidence provided by contributing academic disciplines. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5463. Archaeoastronomy Beyond the Americas.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. A survey of astronomy as documented through traditional world cultures during the historic period and the astronomical associations with monumental prehistoric structure design. Site locations discussed include the British Isles, Egypt, China, Polynesia, and Australia. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5483. Ethnoastronomy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is an examination of how astronomy has been utilized by various cultures throughout history. Topics include ethnoastronomy, cultural interpretations of astral phenomena, and astronomical beliefs relating to creation and religion. (F, Sp)

LSIS 5493. Fieldwork in Archaeoastronomy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, LSIS 5403, LSIS 5423, and departmental permission. A practical application of archaeoastronomy survey fundamentals. Includes a contextual and site literature review and one-week onsite field survey led by departmental faculty. Students will engage in preliminary collaborative data interpretation and have the option to pursue a post field-school publication of their research findings. Survey site will change annually with focus on Chaco Canyon, NM outlier Great Houses. (Su)

LSIS 5700. Advanced Topics in Integrated Studies.2-9 Credit Hours.

2 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive research on a topic related to the student's program of study; variable topics. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5920. Internship in Integrated Studies.2-6 Credit Hours.

2 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. 450 hours of field experience directly related to study focus in the MALS program. Requirements include journal, reports, written summary, and comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5960. Directed Readings.2-9 Credit Hours.

2 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and completion of first concentration core course; or permission of the dean. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 9 hours. In-depth study of literature on a topic related to the student's program of study; variable content. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and completion of first concentration core course; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSIS 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, LSTD 5013, and completion of first concentration core course; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Research and writing of a thesis for completion of CLS graduate degrees. (F, Sp, Su)

LSIS 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and completion of first concentration core course; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSLC 2970. Topics in Lifespan Care and Administration.1-6 Credit Hours.

1 to 6 hours. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six credit hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach in lifespan care and administration. May include reading and research, as well as lecture in a specified area of cultural studies. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3133. Lifespan Health.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS advisor. Lifespan Health will provide students with an introductory survey of the importance and principles of good health over the lifespan. Students will learn how to identify signs of incipient health problems and basic health promotion strategies. Assignments are designed to provide students with practical knowledge and application of health promotion across the lifespan.(F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3173. Human Service Administration I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Introduction to current theory and best practices in the administration of human services in both non-profit and for-profit settings. Topics include legal issues, effective administrative models, leadership in human services organizations, and management of human resources. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3203. Care of Infant and Child.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Introduction to basic principles of child behavior and development and apply those principles to child care settings. Topics include normative physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and sexual development, as well as risk factors for early intervention and referral to professional services. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3223. Problems of the American Family.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Study of the societal influences that may have adverse effects on family life. Factors covered include poverty, divorce, employment, violence, substance abuse and other stressors. Additional topics include historical perspectives on the changing nature of the American family and evidence-supported strategies for coping with and preventing family stressors. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3273. Management of Infant and Child Care Facilities.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. In-depth study of the theory and practice of managing infant and child care facilities. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3313. Issues in Adolescence I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Investigation of the physical, behavioral, mental, emotional and social changes that accompany growth and development during the adolescent years. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3333. Career and Life Development for Adolescents.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Discussion of current research on career options for adolescents. Specific emphasis is placed on providing practitioners with tools needed to develop plans of action to engage youth and help them choose a career and life course. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3373. Management of Adolescent Residential Care Facilities.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. In-depth study of the theory and practice of managing adolescent residential care. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3403. Issues in Geriatrics I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Introduction to key concepts and current research in geriatrics. Topics include operational definitions and terms used in studying geriatrics, facts and misconceptions associated with aging, and a review of US and international gerontological services and social policies. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3473. Management of Geriatric Care Facilities.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Introduction to the basic concepts and approaches to management of older patients and their informal care givers designed for staff and directors of service agencies that care for older individuals. Topics include understanding the motivations for care delivery in old age and the array of services available for geriatric care management. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 3953. Lifespan Capstone Prospectus.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing and LSTD 3003; or permission from CLS adviser. Preparatory course for capstone experience in Lifespan Care and Administration. Course objectives include a critical evaluation of research issues in Lifespan Development, investigation of practicum opportunities, and development of a practicum case study with a preliminary annotated bibliography. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4063. Issues in Lifespan Research.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Discussion of philosophy of science and scientific method as it relates to research in health and human services. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4173. Human Service Administration II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: LSLC 3173, Human Service Administration I. Examination of current theory and best practices in the administration of human services in both non-profit and for-profit settings. Topics include legal issues, effective administrative models, leadership in human and health services organizations, and management of human resources. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4193. Human Service Budgeting and Finance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Introduction to the leadership competencies necessary to formulate, execute, monitor, and evaluate fiscal operations of human services organizations. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4203. Parenting: Different Models.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Review of theory and research on styles and techniques of effective parenting for children and adolescents, including discussion of how contextual, cultural and individual difference factors impact parenting. Applications to real world contexts including counseling and case management services for children and families are also addressed. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4313. Issues in Adolescence II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing and LSLC 3313, or permission from CLS adviser. Continuing study of important issues in adolescence, particularly those that can enhance or interfere with healthy physical, emotional, or social development. Topics include substance abuse, aggression, delinquency, gangs, sex, romantic relationships, peer relationships, and peer pressure. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4403. Issues in Geriatrics II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing and LSLC 3403, or permission from CLS adviser. Continuing study of geriatrics from a biological perspective. Topics include why and how organisms age, what it means to age successfully, and debates over whether and how aging might be slowed, stopped or reversed. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4513. Registered Behavior Technician Preparatory Course.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. An exploration of the basic principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) designed to provide the knowledge base needed to work as a line therapist in ABA programs under the direction of licensed or certified personnel and to become a nationally certified Registered Behavior Technician. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4700. Advanced Topics in Lifespan Care and Administration.1-9 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to lifespan care and administration. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor in specified areas of lifespan care and administration. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4920. Internship in Lifespan Care and Administration.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Field experience in issues related to a student's area of study. Students will gain knowledge through experiential and on-the-job practice. (F, Sp, Su)

LSLC 4953. Lifespan Practicum and Study-in-Depth.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing, and LSTD 3003 and LSLC 3953; or permission from CLS adviser. The senior capstone course in Lifespan Care and Administration consisting of a field practicum followed by a scholarly paper on a specialized topic/case study within the area of lifespan studies. The required paper shall be of the quality and extent comparable to a senior thesis. The study should reflect the student's competence and achievement in sustained research on a topic within lifespan studies. (F, Sp)

LSLC 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LSLC 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSLC 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of PACS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSPS 5113. Foundations in Prevention Science.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides a theoretical and practical basis for exploring the role of primary prevention, examining prevention practice as social action, analyzing prevention systems and development, and evaluating the role of media advocacy and social marketing in effective prevention practice as they relate to substance abuse. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5133. Prevention Across the Lifespan.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Study of lifespan issues related to substance abuse to include theories of human growth and development, brain development, impact of substances on the brain at various stages of development, transition periods, and strategies to address service provision issues. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5173. Program Development Implementation and Evaluation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Facilitates the development of knowledge and skills essential to understanding and applying concepts, principles, processes and models to plan, design, implement and evaluate substance abuse prevention programs. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5203. Drugs and the Brain.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Examination of the effects of drug use on the brain. Topics include physical and functional aspects of the brain, damage to the brain caused by drugs, and how brain damage appears as behavioral patterns that cause problems for individuals, their families, and society in general. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5700. Advanced Topics in Prevention Science.2-9 Credit Hours.

2 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Advanced studies in various prevention science topics, offered under stated titles determined each semester by the instructor involved. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5920. Internship in Prevention Science.2-6 Credit Hours.

2-6 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Field experience directly related to study focus in the Prevention Science program. Requirements include some combination of journal, progress reports, written summary of experiences, or academic paper, and a possible comprehensive examination over these materials. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5960. Directed Readings in Prevention Science.2-9 Credit Hours.

2 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and completion of first concentration course; or permission of dean. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 9 hours. In-depth study of literature on a topic related to the student's program of study; variable content. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and completion of first concentration course; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSPS 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

2 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, LSTD 5013, and completion of first concentration core course; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Research and writing of a thesis for completion of PACS graduate degrees. (F, Sp, Su)

LSPS 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, LSTD 5003, and completion of first concentration course; or permission of dean. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSTD 1603. Operation and Application of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems.3 Credit Hours.

Preparatory course in small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) for students planning to take the FAA's 14 CFR Part 107 initial aeronautical knowledge test. Topics include regulatory requirements associated with certification, registration, and waivers for sUAS flight scenarios and the practical application of sUAS in public and private sectors. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 2203. Evil Acts, Religious Reasons.3 Credit Hours.

Examines the ways in which religious faith has been used to rationalize war, terrorism, ethnic cleansing and other evil acts. Using comparative religious study as a basis for inquiry, students will learn the five warning signs of imminent evil in the name of religion. This is an interdisciplinary course, drawing upon perspectives from religious history, sociology, education and religious philosophy. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 2700. Special Topics in Liberal Studies.1-9 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine credit hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to interdisciplinary studies. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of liberal studies. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 3021. Fundamentals of Online Research.1 Credit Hour.

Equips students to successfully complete academic research in an online environment. Topics will include fundamentals of online research, search tools and applications, OU online resources, research strategies, evaluation of sources, and basics of referencing and citation. Students will have the opportunity to practice online research strategies and apply research methods to topics in their current courses. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 3043. Goal Setting and Attainment.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from academic advisor. Introduction to the importance of establishing goals and the goal attainment process in career, civic, and personal settings. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 3283. Film Noir.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or permission from CLS academic adviser. An exploration of film noir as an art form through the perspectives of history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and technology. Topics include the intellectual and literary origins of film noir and the genre's impact on film making and culture. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 3953. Study-in-Depth Prospectus.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing and LSTD 3003; or permission from CLS adviser. This course helps prepare the student for the senior capstone study in depth paper. Content will focus on upper-division level writing, research and argumentation. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Consists of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (Irreg.)

LSTD 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Subjects covered vary. Deals with concepts not usually treated in regular courses. (Irreg.)

LSTD 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Provides an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work on a special project under the guidance of a professor in the student's field. (Irreg.)

LSTD 4153. Exploring Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. A comparative exploration of the concept of justice as it is defined and applied around the world. Topics include historical and modern theories on justice, the potential contradictions between various understandings of justice, and the real-life implications of these different viewpoints. (Irreg.)

LSTD 4273. Jazz and the Global Community.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. A course about jazz, its social history, and its relationship to world cultures and the international community. Although jazz is no longer the most popular music in the United States, its history and the issues surrounding its nature stand at the heart of a diverse America that has borrowed cultures and traditions all over the world. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 4920. Internship in Liberal Studies.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Field experience in issues related to a student's area of study. Students will gain knowledge through experiential and on-the-job practice. (F, Sp, Su)

LSTD 4953. Study-in-Depth: CLS Capstone Course.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing, LSTD 3003, and LSTD 3953; or permission from CLS adviser. A scholarly paper on a specialized topic, or an artistic or literary creation of the quality and extent comparable to a senior thesis. The study should reflect the student's originality, competence and achievement in sustained research or creative endeavor involving a specific or limited field in some depth. (F, Sp, Su) [V].

LSTD 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing and permission from CLS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LSTD 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LSTD 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of CLS adviser and instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PSAD 3603. Introduction to Aerospace and Defense.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course provides an overview of topics needed by decision makers in the aerospace and defense field. Topics related to the development and history of the field, technology, intelligence, weapons, procurement, strategy, and future trends will be examined. Students will be exposed to a range of ideas and competencies needed by policymakers in a variety of aerospace and defense organizations. (F, Sp)

PSAD 4613. Considerations for Future Aerospace and Defense.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course provides an overview of the aerospace and defense industry, with a focus on the development of national strategy and doctrine, international political environment, contemporary and future procurement, and future developments in technology and planning. Students will learn about the key players in the industry, the challenges and opportunities, and the role of aerospace and defense in national security. (F, Sp)

PSBA 2283. Understanding Management.3 Credit Hours.

Examines organizational planning, the process of organizational decision making, the early research on leadership that focuses on personal traits, motivation in organizations, communicating in organizations, teamwork in organizations, the principles of organization and organizational control. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA 3123. Applied Budget & Finance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course serves as an introduction to fundamental financial principles utilized in business today. It is increasingly important for nonfinancial managers to be able to understand financial terms at a nontechnical level. This course provides students with an understanding of financial terminology and accounting methods so that they can effectively explain the financial implications of decisions made within the business. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA 3143. Marketing and Brand Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. Focuses on marketing and marketing strategy planning, examining the "Four Ps" (Product, Place, Promotion, and Price). The course integrates topics such as international marketing, social media, and ethics throughout the units. The course will also cover brand management concepts, discussing how branding should result in increased sales, as well as how branding integrates into the other areas of marketing. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA 3223. Finance for Non-Finance Managers.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. An introduction to financial information for leaders who are not directly responsible for accounting or finance functions in their organizations. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA 4123. Quality Initiatives in Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from advisor. Total quality management enables leaders of for-profit, nonprofit, public sector, and multinational organizations to produce high-quality products and services that customers want. The TQM process adds value to customers' lives and positions the organization to respond quickly to changing consumer preferences. Lean, Six Sigma, Kaizen, and benchmarking methods help leaders systematically optimize and modernize their organizational practices to improve effectiveness. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA 4133. Human Resources Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course is designed to implement the administration of Human Resources within all types of organizations. The theoretical review covers the aspects related to the analysis of work and job design while discussing behavioral aspects that affect Human Resources performance. The practical approach will review recruitment, selection, training, career development, performance management, compensation, labor relations, rules, and regulations. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA 4163. Non-Profit Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from CLS adviser. Provides an overview of nonprofit management, operations, and leadership as well as the problems and environment unique to the various nonprofit entities functioning in society. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA 4173. Business Ethics and Legal Environment.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course will help students develop an understanding of the law and its application to the business environment. Emphasis will be on recognition of legal problems, critical thinking, and ethical analysis. Few can conduct business without having to consider and deal with legal, ethical, and social responsibility issues. This course prepares students for reasoned decision-making in the workplace. (F, Sp, Su)

PSBA G4623. Principles of Lean Thinking.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Explores the interdependencies of Lean process improvement tools and the business culture elements required for companies to evolve from mediocrity to excellence. Students will be challenged to capture current state conditions of processes and suggest improvements based on the mentalities of Lean (Continuous Improvement + Respect for People). Lean Six Sigma Yellow Belt certification is included. (F, Sp)

PSCJ 2283. Introduction to Criminal Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Investigation and analysis of the three major components of the criminal justice system: police, courts, and corrections. Topics include the criminal justice system's ability to balance crime control and individual civil liberties, the use of formal and informal decision-making processes, and the effectiveness of criminal justice policies, practices, and programs. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3063. Statistics in Criminal Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. An introduction to the basics of social statistics, the methods and techniques which sociologists, policy analysts, and other social scientists use to summarize numeric data obtained from censuses, surveys, and experiments. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3113. Comparative Justice Systems.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Examines and compares the legal and criminal justice systems of different nations. Focuses on historical, political and social factors, and explains their influence on legal institutions and systems of justice. Discusses points of divergence between other societies and the United States in perceived causes of crime and differing approaches to rehabilitation and crime prevention. Countries representing Europe, Africa, Asia and (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3133. Theories of Criminal Behavior.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. An overview of theories of criminal behavior as well as current issues in criminology. Students will be exposed to biological, sociological and psychological theories of crime, as well as opposing viewpoints on important topics in criminology. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3173. Deviance and Social Control.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Students will be introduced to the sociological study of deviance and social control, with a focus on the social construction of deviant behavior and the relative nature of such definitions through time and across cultures. Current research on selected types of deviance will be reviewed to understand the individual and structural dimension of behavior as well as implications for policy (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3203. Criminal Justice Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Covers the development, proliferation, institutionalization, and goals of the components of the criminal justice system and their administration. The course will also cover the ethics of managing justice and punishment. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3223. American Judicial Processes.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Acquaints students of criminal justice with the overall structure of state and federal courts, including jurisdiction, sources of law, civil and criminal legal procedures from initial pleadings through appeal, substantive civil and criminal law, and policy issues about the role of the judiciary in representative government. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3413. Crime Scene Processing.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission from academic advisor. Introductory training in the process of crime scene management and how to become proficient in recognizing evidence and determining the proper packaging and preservation methods. Topics include basic methods in crime scene photography, sketching, collection, and documentation. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 3463. Homeland Security and Emerging Threats.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from PACS advisor. An introduction to the organizational and process aspects of Homeland Security at federal, state, and local levels and the emerging threats to the U.S. homeland. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4123. Introduction to Forensic Science/Criminalistics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Using the study and application of science to examine the relationship between science disciplines, and the criminal investigative process, students will be presented with theories and principles related to methods in the recognition, collection, preservation and analysis of physical evidence. Actual forensic cases will be presented and discussed throughout the course. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4143. Drugs and Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Examines the impact of drug abuse on contemporary American society. Students learn about drug regulation and legal issues, how drugs affect the brain and shape behavior, and the various categories of drugs and their characteristics. Also focuses on drug abuse prevention, treating drug dependence, and law enforcement programs to address drugs in society. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4243. Police and Policing.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Provides a historical perspective of policing as well as up-to-date information on policing and the issues that police deal with in a post-9/11 society. The course will provide students with a basic understanding of the CSI effect, the creation of the Department of Homeland Security and developments in community policing. The course also highlights the role of officers in society (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4263. The American Correctional System.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. A survey course covering the development of the field of corrections from its early American roots to the present. Included are discussions of the role and function of jails, traditional and modern correctional facilities, private/contract corrections, and probation and parole. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4273. Community Corrections.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. Introduction to the topics of probation, parole, and other alternatives to incarceration, collectively referred to as Community Corrections. Emphasis will be placed on the role of research and program evaluation in determining policy/program effectiveness. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4403. Criminal Investigation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Provides students with the theoretical and practical aspects of criminal investigation. Students develop an analytical and practical understanding of investigative methodology, the collection and preservation of physical evidence and explore current crime solving technology. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4413. Intelligence Analysis for Law Enforcement.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. A survey of intelligence analysis and the use of data, cyber, and human sources of information to predict, interdict, and investigate crime. Topics include understanding the role of intelligence analysis and dissemination in modern law enforcement and homeland security, crime analysis techniques, geographic information systems, cyber data gathering, and human sources of intelligence. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4423. Cyberspace Security.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Provides an in-depth exploration of cyberspace crime and security. An intensive study of the types of crimes committed in cyberspace, a profile of offenders, and current legal issues in cyberspace. Students will explore emerging issues in information assurance and prevention of cyberspace crimes and will examine the proper collection, preservation and examination of digital evidence. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4443. Juvenile Delinquency.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. An overview of juvenile delinquency in the United States, including current issues. Students will read both classic studies on the emergence of the juvenile system and current research on trends in juvenile delinquency. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4453. Human Trafficking.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. An examination of human trafficking and slavery, including bonded labor, forced migration, and sex trafficking. Topics include historical and modern examples from both the United States and global contexts, as well as current policies and laws intended to combat human trafficking. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4463. Homeland/Global Security and Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from PACS adviser. Designed to help the student understand how governments deal with the problem of securing the homeland. Examines what terrorism is, and how America has traditionally dealt with homeland security, and how that perspective is evolving. Once we understand what terrorism is, the focus of the course will be on how law enforcement and the courts have taken on the challenge (F, Sp, Su)

PSCJ 4493. Organized Crime and International Drug Trafficking.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from PACS advisor. An examination of trends relating to international drug trafficking and organized crime. Topics include the history of the drug trade, criminal organizations and governments involved in drug trafficking, and emerging issues relating to the digital world and cyberspace. (F, Sp, Su)

PSCS 3613. Software and Information Technology Systems.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course provides students with an overview of core computer technology concepts common to complex modern organizations. Students will be exposed to a range of software and information technology topics needed by managers and decision-makers in a variety of organizations, including core ideas of software, data storage, collaborative work systems, web-based applications, data security, hardware, networks, and programming. (F, Sp)

PSCS 4603. Applied Statistics for Data Analytics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course provides students with an overview of core concepts and techniques in statistical data analysis. Students will be exposed to a range of statistical and data analytic techniques needed by managers and decisionmakers in a variety of organizations. Students will gain understanding of the core ideas of validity, the empirical method, statistical testing, and insight into quantitative data analysis. (F, Sp)

PSHA 3153. Ethical and Legal Issues in Health Care.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Introduction to the ethical and legal issues caregivers and administrators face in providing health services throughout the lifespan. (F, Sp, Su)

PSHA 3523. Healthcare Finance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course serves as an introduction to the concepts of healthcare finance. Course content includes fundamentals of finance, principles of accounting, planning, budgeting, financial statement preparation, and capital analysis. This course will provide students with an understanding of financial management and accounting methods to make effective and efficient decisions applicable to the healthcare industry. (F, Sp, Su)

PSHA 4513. Healthcare Operations Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. Healthcare operations management integrates scientific principles of management to determine the most efficient methods to support patient care delivery. Healthcare in the United States is continuously innovating, reducing costs, and improving quality. Topics include managed care, health plans, value-based payments, quality improvement, information technology, statistical analysis, supply chain management, and healthcare finance, among other important aspects of management. (F, Sp, Su)

PSHA 4533. Healthcare Program Evaluation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course facilitates the development of knowledge and skills essential to understand and apply the concepts, principles, processes, models, and assessment strategies imperative to plan, design, implement, and evaluate a healthcare system, education program, or prevention program. (F, Sp, Su)

PSHU 1213. Creativity in the Arts.3 Credit Hours.

Students will learn about the literary, visual and performance arts by viewing, reading and listening to some of the most famous examples of the arts. Students will also learn about the creative process through the production of their own art. (F, Sp, Su)

PSHU 3113. Special Topics in the Humanities of the Ancient World.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Students will explore a broad variety of cultural themes found concurrently in both western and non-western cultures from Antiquity through the Middle Ages. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC].

PSHU 3133. Special Topics in the Humanities of the Modern World.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Students will explore a broad variety of cultural themes found concurrently in both western and non-western cultures from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment and into the Modern World. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC].

PSHU 3173. Renaissance Art.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. A critical discussion of the art of the Italian Renaissance. The focus of this course will be on explicating religious textual narratives and exploring how artists translated these ideas into visual form to create an effective message. The course will deal with painting, sculpture and architecture and will highlight well-known artists. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-AF].

PSHU 3193. Art of the Non-Western World.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Explores variety of cultural themes found in non-western art from the ancient to the modern world. Introduction to art of non-western cultures and the role that art history plays in the study of these objects. Consists of four parts: African art; Asian art of India, China and Japan; native American art of North, Meso-America; and South America and the Pacific. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WDC].

PSHU 3283. Film Noir.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission from academic adviser. An exploration of film noir as an art form through the perspectives of history, sociology, psychology, philosophy, and technology. Topics include the intellectual and literary origins of film noir and the genre's impact on film making and culture. (F, Sp, Su)

PSHU 4163. World Religions and Ecology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. A multi-religious perspective on the environment investigating how various religious traditions treat the relationship between human agency and the environment. Topics include the connections between religion, politics, economics, social policies and the environment, as well as sustainability, eco-justice, and globalization. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

PSHU 4173. Women in the Bible and Qur’an.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. An examination of women in the Bible and Qur'an and the insight this exploration provides about religious traditions. Topics include the roles of women within these Scriptures, their role relative to men in general, their place in the foundational myths such as the creation accounts, and the ways in which women negotiate power and authority. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

PSHU 4183. Crafting the Cinematic Jesus.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. Surveys common understandings of the person and goals of Jesus, and the roles of other biblical figures, through film and literature. Examines the role that film plays in religious understanding, the role of culture in religion, the variety of conceptions of Jesus, and key issues of the Christian tradition. (Irreg.) [IV-AF].

PSHU 4193. Women of the Middle East and North Africa.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic advisor. An examination of women in the Middle East and North Africa. Topics include the social, political, and economical status of women in the region, the effects of globalization, and a discussion of recent political and cultural changes. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WDC].

PSHU 4213. A Critical Review of the Bible as a Literary Work.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Examines the Bible as a work of literature, approaching it without concern for the doctrines of any particular religion. The aim of the course is to make students biblically familiar with both the Old and New Testaments. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC].

PSHU 4293. Exploring Race and Gender in Film.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic adviser. An exploration of race and gender in film during the post-civil rights period. Examines the effects of inequality and inclusiveness through the cinematic lens and analyzes the evolution of film relating to the depiction of race and gender issues. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 1003. Introduction to Interdisciplinary Study.3 Credit Hours.

An introductory study of the concepts and practices of interdisciplinary inquiry, writing, critical thinking and problem solving across disciplines, and techniques for solving problems and writing papers from an interdisciplinary perspective. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 1113. Interdisciplinary Composition I.3 Credit Hours.

First in a series of two courses that help prepare students for interdisciplinary work by emphasizing writing and the conventions of academic discourse through natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Students will employ a variety of writing strategies, study expository prose models and interpret, critique, summarize and paraphrase test. (F, Sp, Su) [I-ENGL].

PSIS 1133. Interdisciplinary Composition II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 or PSIS 1113, or equivalent. This course completes the series of composition courses by emphasizing argument, library research, and style. Through its emphasis on thinking rhetorically, providing evidence for assertions, creative thinking, and writing as a process, this course will prepare students for argument and research-based writing in academic interdisciplinary settings. (F, Sp, Su) [I-ENGL].

PSIS 2023. Strategies for Success.3 Credit Hours.

An exploration of useful skills and strategies for academic, professional, and personal success. Topics discussed include individual learning styles, emotional intelligence, time management, goal setting, effective listening and communication, organization, creative and critical thinking, interdependence and collaboration skills, and combating self-defeating patterns of thoughts and behaviors. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 2033. Writing for Success.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or departmental permission. An exploration of writing skills and strategies for academic essays, personal narratives and research. Topics include the selection of a research topic, development of a writing plan, the correct way to summarize and paraphrase, and the use of the APA citation style. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3003. Interdisciplinary Inquiry.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Will focus on adult learning theory and development, assessment of prior learning, development of self-directed learning skills, educational and career planning and writing of portfolios and learning contracts. Designed for the returning, adult learner. Will also focus on preparation for academic writing and argumentation. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3013. Effective Communication.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. Students will enhance their interpersonal and professional communication skills in this course. Special attention is paid to recognizing the role of listening in communication, in addition to enhancing verbal, nonverbal, written, and presentation skills. Throughout the course, students will apply these concepts to real world situations and reflect on the impact of communication in their personal and professional lives. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3053. Digital Literacy & Data Analysis.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course is designed to increase students' knowledge and application of digital and quantitative data literacy. Students will also be introduced to principles of ethical decision-making. Using applied activities and analyses, students will learn how to utilize these skills in the real world and the workplace. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3071. Life Design 101.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. A holistic examination of a student's life, skill set, and career aspirations. Includes assessment inventories, personal reflections, and the development of action plans. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3083. Life Design: A Better You.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. The Transformation Triad is designed to help students find ways to introduce more balance into their lives, uncover their purpose, and use that knowledge to produce meaningful change within themselves in order to lead their best life. Students will evaluate their life on a fundamental level and create balance along with a concrete plan for what will come after graduation. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3153. Foundations of Ethics in Liberal Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. A foundation for the scholarly research and discussion of ethics. Topics will include historical and philosophical grounding in the consideration of ethics. The course will utilize an interdisciplinary approach to the inquiry of ethics. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3243. Leadership in LGBTQ Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or permission from an academic advisor. An introduction to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, (LGBTQ+) and marginalized individuals based on their sexual/romantic orientation. Empirical data is utilized to holistically explore the experiences of this community as a means of understanding factors and limitations in leadership. (F, Sp, Su) [III-SS].

PSIS 3343. Challenges in a Changing World.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser; PSSC 1313. Conformity and deviance in societies. Topics addressed include sexual behavior, drug use and crime and violence. It also looks at social problems expressed on a broader scale, including those associated with increased problems and associated urbanization and the outbreaks of war, terrorism and international conflict arising from inequalities occurring on an international scale. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 3953. Critical Inquiry in Interdisciplinary Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Departmental permission and approximately 70% of program core complete. This course requires students to locate, critique, and integrate literature/concepts to demonstrate their understanding of the foundational principles of interdisciplinary studies and their primary area of concentration. During the course, students will complete a series of assignments that will be used in the development of a comprehensive ePortfolio, which will be constructed and finalized in LSIS 4953. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 4033. Innovative Problem-Solving.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course is intended to empower students to think clearly and analytically about information and beliefs. Students will be prepared to recognize bias and common fallacies in reasoning and evaluate informational resources. An introduction to innovative thinking and creative decision-making will help position students to tackle problem-solving at the personal, academic, and career levels. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 4353. Mediation: History, Theory, and Practice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. The course provides an overview of the history of mediation as well as an introduction to substantive mediation theories and models. The practice of mediation will be introduced by examining its origins in both the court and community-focused movements. Contemporary applications and trends in mediation also will be examined. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 4483. Calendars, Culture, and Cosmos.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. This course details the many ways in which contemporary timekeeping is founded upon astronomy. It explores early derivations by cultures learning to keep time by observing movements of the Moon and Sun and traces this development to contemporary timekeeping systems. The calendars of many present cultures are examined in depth. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 4700. Advanced Topics in Liberal Studies.1-9 Credit Hours.

1 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser; PSSC 2213; may be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to interdisciplinary studies. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor in specified areas of liberal studies. (F, Sp, Su)

PSIS 4953. Portfolio in Interdisciplinary Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSIS 3953 and departmental permission. The practicum course for the Interdisciplinary Studies program requires students to create a comprehensive ePortfolio, which showcases their key learnings about effective communication, digital literacy, data analysis, innovative problem-solving, and their primary area of concentration. (F, Sp, Su)

PSMS 1053. Mathematics in Liberal Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Norman Campus students only - DMAT 0123 at OU, satisfactory score on the placement test, or satisfactory score on the ACT/SAT. Designed to enhance the student's ability to understand and utilize mathematical tools in their daily lives. Covers such topics as use of statistics, evaluating others' use of statistics, mathematics in finance, and growth models. (F, Sp, Su) [I-M].

PSNS 1513. Introduction to Interdisciplinary Physical Sciences.3 Credit Hours.

Emphasis on physics and chemistry, including topics such as the laws of motion, elements of thermodynamics, wave forms and properties, structure of atoms, and the formation of chemical bonds. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 2413. Celestial Insights.3 Credit Hours.

This course explores questions about the natural world and how astronomy is/has been used in culture. Students learn about Moon phases, seasons, blue skies, eclipses, and tides and their relation to astronomy. The course investigates how cultures kept time by the Sun and Moon, astronomical derivations for the names of days, and reasons behind changing times for moveable feasts. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 2514. The Human Environment.4 Credit Hours.

Explores the interaction between the environment and multiple disciplines, such as society, the economy, and politics. Students will be immersed in an interactive experience in which they learn about the basic chemical properties and processes of the physical environment and how other parts of their world affect it. (F, Sp, Su) [II-NS].

PSNS 2533. Science as a Process.3 Credit Hours.

Analysis and criticism of the scientific method, design of experiments and collection and interpretation of data in scientific investigations. (F, Sp, Su) [II-NS].

PSNS 2553. Interdisciplinary Life Sciences.3 Credit Hours.

A study of the integration of biological systems at the cellular level. It includes discussions of metabolism, chromosome structure and function and the structure and function of the DNA molecule. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 2700. Special Topics in Liberal Studies.1-9 Credit Hours.

1 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine credit hours. Specific course content will be defined each time the course is offered. A problem-oriented approach to interdisciplinary studies. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of liberal studies. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 3113. Lifespan Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Survey of human development from birth to death, drawing from multiple disciplines including biology, psychology, sociology, and medicine. The emphasis is on empirically-derived information about human development that may be of practical use to individuals working directly with others in a service capacity. Particular attention is devoted to issues of physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development at all stages of (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 3413. History of Astronomy in Culture.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing or departmental permission. An exploration of the historical methods and uses of astronomy in cultures throughout the world, with examples from six continents and islands in the Pacific. (F, Sp)

PSNS 3423. Biology of Human Aging.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Introduction of both natural science and social science methods used to study aging in humans and other creatures. Topics will include a synopsis of the demographics of aging in human populations, terms and theories of aging, mechanisms of aging at the cellular level, and a review of how the body ages, system-by-system. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 3513. The Dynamic Universe.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Select topics including the Big Bang, formation of matter and its association into stars and planets, plate tectonics and the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 3533. Ecology and Evolution.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. A study of the interactions of genetic change in organisms with environmental stress, and contributions of these interactions to evolution. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 3573. Chemistry for Changing Times.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. An overview of chemistry, with fundamentals and organic processes explained. The course investigates chemicals found in everyday life and on the earth with the aim of understanding how chemical processes are at work, both in the environment around us and in energy, air, water, biochemistry, drugs, poisons and chemicals. It is ideal for the generalist and the interdisciplinary student, although (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 4563. Weather and Climate.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. An introduction to energy balance, temperature, atmospheric moisture, cloud formation, static stability, precipitation mechanisms, winds, mid-latitude and severe storms, weather forecasting and climate. The course is designed for students who are not scientists. (F, Sp, Su)

PSNS 4593. The Role of Genetic Engineering: Past, Present and Future.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Examines the role of gene manipulation in the past, present, and future. It will begin with descriptions of genes, evolution and fitness, and will conclude by exploring the scientific and political future of genetic engineering. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3113. Leadership in Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. The general purpose of this course is to learn about contemporary thinking regarding leadership in organizations and the applications of these insights for growth as a leader. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3133. Conflict Resolution.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. A review of several contemporary theories of the nature of conflict and how best to manage it. Students examine the communication process and practice effective communication skills through exercise. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3153. Ethics in Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. Explores the principles and standards of conduct used by organizational leaders to build trust and integrity in business through systemic ethical practices. Students grow their leadership capacity by developing the behaviors and virtues of the workforce that contribute to sustainable ethical business conduct. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3333. Motivation in Learning and Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Introduces learners to several theories on human motivation which can be applied across several contexts, including both learning and leadership. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3373. Measuring Human Performance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or permission from an academic advisor. An exploration of how leaders use assessments to measure human performance in organizations. Topics include common research terminology, best practices in employee selection, performance appraisals, and organizational performance management. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3393. Goal Setting in Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from advisor. An examination of the importance of establishing goals, goal alignment, and goal attainment processes in organizational settings. Key concepts include perspectives of goal attainment strategies that apply to organizational effectiveness and methods to overcome inevitable challenges to goal success. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3513. Integrated Marketing Strategies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Focuses on marketing communications by examining many types of retailers, the basic concepts that apply to all areas of promotion, basic selling techniques, and advertising and sales promotion as important parts of a promotion blend. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 3953. Research Analysis and Application in Organizational Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and LSTD 3003, or permission from advisor. Preparatory course for the organizational leadership capstone. Students examine, critique, integrate, and apply organizational behavior literature and concepts to demonstrate mastery of the foundational principles of leadership. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 4113. Group & Organizational Communication.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. Designed to support students in the development of interpersonal and employment-related business communication skills as an integral component in the field of business administration. Topics covered include foundational communication principles; communication planning; oral, written, and electronic communication; formal report-writing and presentation; and employment communication. Students will apply their knowledge on these topics by completing written, spoken (recorded), and team-discussion-based coursework. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 4143. Cultural Diversity in the Workplace.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or departmental permission. Students will explore their personal perceptions about diversity in organizational settings, learn how implicit bias can undermine organizational performance, and develop best practices to promote cultural diversity in the workplace. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 4203. Decision-Making, Problem Solving, and Strategic Thinking.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser. Exploration of decision-making, problem solving and strategic thinking in a variety of organizational settings. Discussion of applied intelligence and the methods/tools utilized to make effective decisions. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 4283. Social Processes in Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing or permission from an academic advisor. An overview of how leaders use social processes to improve organizational performance. Topics include the individual factors that affect social processes, i.e. personality, emotion, attitudes, perceptions, etc., and strategies to motivate employees, lead teams, communicate ideas, and develop an organizational culture. (F, Sp, Su)

PSOL 4953. Capstone in Organizational Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing, PSIS 3003, and PSOL 3953, or permission from advisor; students may enroll in PSOL 3953 and PSOL 4953 during the same semester provided that PSOL 3953 is successfully completed (grade of C or higher) prior to the start of PSOL 4953. Capstone course in organizational leadership resulting in the creation of a comprehensive ePortfolio that demonstrates student mastery of leadership theories and best practices. (F, Sp, Su) [V].

PSSC 1153. A History of the United States.3 Credit Hours.

A general historical overview of the United States with a particular focus on the role that the humanities played in shaping this country. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-US].

PSSC 1313. What in the World are the Social Sciences?.3 Credit Hours.

Discusses what comprises the social sciences and how we perform research in the different areas, including addressing ethical questions. (F, Sp, Su) [III-SS].

PSSC 1333. Government in the United States.3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the differing ideologies governing autocratic vs. democratic systems of government, the structure of the United States government, and the role of extra-governmental elements such as lobbyists and the PACs on the process of governing. (F, Sp, Su) [III-PSC].

PSSC 2313. The Human Experience: The Role of Culture.3 Credit Hours.

A critical discussion of prejudice, discrimination, gender identity and crime and deviance from the perspective of the social sciences. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 2323. Human Groups and Distribution of Resources.3 Credit Hours.

A study of culture from a social sciences perspective, including investigating topics such as ethnocentrism, cultural relativism and personal identity within the context of being American. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 2333. Contemporary Social Issues.3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to social issues in modern day society. Beginning with an introduction to differing sociological perspectives, and addresses issues such as the changing demographics in the U.S., gender inequality, the environment, and both utopian and dystopian societies. Students will be expected to review, consider, and write how each of the topics impacts their lives, either directly or indirectly. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 3203. Diversity in the United States.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing or permission from an academic advisor. An examination of current issues of race, gender, class, and culture utilizing a combination of empirical data, historic records and conceptual reflection. (F, Sp, Su) [III-SS].

PSSC 3223. Social Justice Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permission from academic advisor. An interdisciplinary examination of issues related to social justice and leadership. The concepts of race, class, gender, and ability are addressed from a variety of historical, conceptual, and theoretical perspectives relating to the study of social difference. Also includes an analysis of social movements and strategies for community engagement. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 3263. Multiculturalism in the Workplace: Global Challenges.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior Standing or departmental permission. An examination of psychological and organizational challenges that leaders experience in a multicultural or multinational workplace. Includes case studies and discussions to illustrate theories and research findings for developing positive employee engagement strategies. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 3333. Human Arrangements: Troubled Institutions, Probs. Inequality.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser; LSTD 1313 and LSTD 1323. Issues affecting institutions from family through those affecting the national population, including health care, education, the economy, and the interaction of government with all such questions. Problems arising from inequality among groups in the society, including poverty, elderly and young, minority and majority, and gender concerns. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 3363. Ethics in Social Sciences.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission from adviser; LSTD 1313 and LSTD 1323. Concepts, principles and case studies involved in ethics in the social sciences, with a particular emphasis on business ethics. Students will examine core values in light of social conditioning, short-term profiteering and the need for affiliation. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 3373. American Public Intellectuals.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from adviser. Examines the unique and diverse styles of six important Americans from different eras in order to determine the impact these individuals had on society and posterity. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 3383. Harry Potter and the Culture of the Wizarding World.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, ENGL 1213 or equivalent; junior standing or permission from Academic Advisor. This course takes a social sciences approach to analyze social and cultural themes within the films from the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. Students will practice social science methodologies and apply key social sciences concepts to evaluate character actions, relationships, and social structures within the wizarding world, drawing parallels to current and historical events and personal experiences as well. (F, Sp, Su) [III-SS].

PSSC 4133. US History of World War II - Pacific Theater.3 Credit Hours.

A review of several contemporary theories of the United States involvement in World War II: Pacific Theater. Students examine the historical process and practice effective communication skills through exercise. (F, Sp, Su)

PSSC 4263. Understanding Race in American Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission from academic adviser. An exploration of the major theoretical perspectives used to explain racial issues in the United States. Identifies common racial/ethnic assumptions through an examination of how race or ethnicity is portrayed in the media with a comparison of current research findings relating to inequality. (F, Sp, Su)

Faculty

Last Name First/Middle Name Middle init. OU Service start Title(s), date(s) appointed Degrees Earned, Schools, Dates Completed
Alavi Roksana 2011 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PROFESSIONAL & CONTINUING STUDIES, 2018; ASSISTANT ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES, 2012 PhD, Univ of Kansas, 2008; MA, Oklahoma State Univ, 2001; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1996
Duncan John L 2007 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2007; ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES, 2010 PhD, Univ of Oklahoma, 1998; MA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1980; BA, North Texas State Univ, 1978
Gullberg Steven R 2016 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2019 PhD, James Cook Univ, 2010; MLS, Univ of Oklahoma, 2002; BS, SUNY, 1985
Ketchum Paul R 2005 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2009 PhD, Texas A&M Univ, 2007; MA, California State Univ, 2001; BA, California Polytechnic, 1992