Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy

Phillip Gutierrez, Chair
100 Nielsen Hall
440 W. Brooks St.
Norman, OK 73019
Phone: (405) 325-3961
FAX: (405) 325-7557
office@nhn.ou.edu
www.nhn.ou.edu/

General Information

The Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy has a long tradition of educating scientists, engineers and teachers who have achieved distinguished careers as researchers and leaders in industry and education. Our graduates include a former Science Advisor to the President of the United States, a former director of NSF, university president, U.S. ambassador, founders of corporations, Arctic explorer, founder and first editor of the American Journal of Physics, journal editors, inventors, research laboratory managers, university department chairs, Rhodes Scholar and Guggenheim Fellows, university professors, and hundreds of people devoted to advancing knowledge and improving the quality of life.

Programs & Facilities

Programs for Academic Excellence

Innovative education programs have been an integral part of the department since its inception and are still our tradition. In addition to our own faculty, post-doctoral fellows and weekly colloquium speakers promote academic excellence within the department. With additional support from state monies and private endowment, the department hosts a large number of visiting scientists each year who bring the latest developments in their areas of interest and who present opportunities to exchange scientific ideas.

The department offers all undergraduate majors the opportunity to perform research with faculty mentors, and runs a federally funded summer research experience for undergraduates from all across the country.

The OU Soonertarium is an educational outreach program whose goal is to share the joy of exploring the cosmos with fellow Oklahomans, one classroom at a time. They provide traveling planetarium shows and lectures, free of charge, to interested science classrooms in Oklahoma.

Special Facilities and Programs

Library Resources

The Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy library possesses an excellent scientific library of over 20,000 volumes and more than 150 journal subscriptions. Ancillary library holdings include the world-famous History of Science Collection and the Engineering Library.

Instrument Shop

The instrument shop at the Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy has supported the experimental research needs of the department for a century. This facility has designed, built and collaborated on a wide variety of apparatus including, but not limited to: High Energy Physics work on DØ, Higgs Boson, and Monopole detector systems; Atomic Molecular scattering systems — Electron-Photon Coincidence, Electric Dipole Moment, Cold Atom systems; UHV chambers and associated hardware; Thin film sputtering systems; High Pressure (100,000 PSI) systems, Electro-mechanical drive and control; Furnace construction and PID control; Telescope repair.

Laboratory Resources

The department has well-equipped laboratories for research in laser cooling and trapping of atoms and molecules, atomic and molecular collisions, nanostructured materials and devices, materials characterization, and high-energy physics instrumentation. We are also home to a multi-million dollar NSF funded Materials Research Science and Engineering Center. This center greatly expands our research effort in nanostructures. Additionally, many programs make use of facilities at national laboratories, such as Fermilab, and Los Alamos. The high-energy group is part of the DØ and ATLAS collaborations. Our astronomical researchers use national observatory facilities at Arecibo, VLA, Kitt Peak, Cerro Tololo and the Hubble Space Telescope. We also have a small on-campus observatory for class use and public viewing.

Scholarships and Financial Aid

The department offers a number of scholarships each year to students majoring in physics, astronomy, or engineering physics. Undergraduate majors and students who are considering becoming physics, astrophysics, or engineering physics majors are encouraged to apply for scholarships through the University of Oklahoma Centralized Academic Scholarship Hub (CASH).

Teaching and research assistantships are offered on a competitive basis to graduate students.

Undergraduate Study

Physics Degrees

The student whose major is physics may work for the professional degree of Bachelor of Physics or for the standard degree of Bachelor of Science, both of which are awarded by the College of Arts and Sciences. The Engineering Physics Bachelor of Science program is an interdisciplinary degree program which combines the course offerings and research activities of the Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy and the College of Engineering. This degree program is offered by the College of Engineering and detailed information concerning the program can be found in the College of Engineering section of this catalog.

Astrophysics Degree

Students whose major interest is the application of physics to modern astrophysics may work for the Astrophysics Bachelor of Science.

Astronomy Degree

The student whose major is astronomy may work for the standard degree of Bachelor of Science.

Minors

Minors are offered in physics and astronomy.

Graduate Study

Areas of Specialization

Research areas available for both M.S. and Ph.D. degrees include:

Master Of Science Degree

The department offers a Master of Science in Physics program with or without the thesis.

Master Of Science (Engineering Physics)

The Engineering Physics, Master of Science degree is offered as either a thesis or non-thesis program.

Doctoral Programs

The Physics Ph.D. program requires the student to complete at least 90 hours of coursework, take and pass the written Qualifying and General (Specialist) examinations, and complete and successfully defend the results of original research as a dissertation.

All Ph.D. students are required to take an appointment as a teaching assistant with a minimum of two semester contact hours for two semesters. This teaching practicum is independent of financial support by the department.

Students who are interested in the Engineering Physics Ph.D. should refer to the general requirements of the Graduate College and the College of Engineering. Every student will be assigned an advisory committee who will determine the specific requirements within the guidelines set by these colleges and the career study goals of the student.

The required physics core courses and the Qualifying and Specialist exams are the same as for physics.

Courses

ASTR 1504. Astronomy: Exploring the Universe.4 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy. The solar system, the sun and stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, current theories of the origin, evolution and fate of the universe. Not for major credit. Students cannot receive credit in both 1504 and 1514. (F, Sp, Su) [II-NL].

ASTR 1514. Astronomy: Exploring the Universe with Laboratory.4 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the concepts of modern astronomy. The solar system, the sun and stars, the Milky Way and other galaxies, current theories of the origin, evolution, and fate of the universe. Not for major credit. Students cannot receive credit in both 1504 and 1514. Laboratory (F, Sp, Su) [II-LAB].

ASTR 1523. Life in the Universe.3 Credit Hours.

Introductory astronomy course focusing on general physical conditions under which life is thought to arise and evolve in the universe. Topics include historical astronomy, gravitation and planetary orbits, the solar system. The earth's geology and atmosphere, stellar evolution, theories for the origin of life on earth, the discoveries of extrasolar planets, and the search for extraterrestrial life. Course is not for major credit in physics and astronomy, however it is appropriate for Journalism and Mass Communications, Zoology, Education and Chemistry majors as well as others who want an introduction to our current understanding of life in the universe. (Sp) [II-NL].

ASTR 2513. Introductory Astrophysics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PHYS 1215 or 2524, or permission of instructor. An introduction to solar system astronomy and basic astrophysical concepts for majors and students with a knowledge of introductory physics and calculus. Includes planetary system formation, asteroids, comets, terrestrial planets and giant planets. Astrophysical concepts including Keplers laws, blackbody radiation, hydrostatic equilibrium and heat transfer. Elements of astronomy, including time, celestial coordinates, telescopes and detectors, magnitudes and color indices. (F)

ASTR 2970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics. 1 to 3 hours. May be repeated; Maximum credit nine hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research, and field projects. (Irreg.)

ASTR 3103. Stars.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2513 or permission of instructor. Stellar properties and stellar evolution. Includes fundamental properties of stars (temperature, luminosity, mass) and how to determine them, star formation, main sequence, post main sequence, supernovae, black holes, neutron stars, white dwarfs, binary stars. (F)

ASTR 3113. Galaxies and Cosmology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2513 or permission of instructor; 3103 strongly recommended. Galactic and extragalactic astronomy. Includes the Milky Way galaxy, the interstellar medium, normal and active galaxies, clusters of galaxies, cosmology. (Sp)

ASTR 3190. Topics in Astronomy.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. (F, Su)

ASTR 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

ASTR 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Consists of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

ASTR 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Subjects covered vary. Deals with concepts not usually treated in regular courses. (Irreg.)

ASTR 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Provides an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

ASTR 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Sp, Su)

ASTR G4303. Stellar Astrophysics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3113 or permission of instructor. Physics of stars: gas and radiation laws, stellar atmospheres and spectra, stellar interiors and evolution. (F)

ASTR 4523. Advanced Observatory Methods.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2513 and 3103. Techniques of multiwavelength observational astronomy. Includes time and coordinates, physics of astronomical ccds, telescopes, photometry, extinction correction, technical feasibility calculations, optical spectroscopy, and x-ray astronomy. Introductions to gamma-ray, infrared, UV radio astronomy. No student may earn credit for both 4523 and 5523. (Irreg.)

ASTR 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

ASTR 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

ASTR 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

ASTR 5403. High-Energy Astrophysics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4303 or permission of instructor. High-energy radiation processes in astronomy: synchrotron radiation, bremsstrahlung, inverse Compton-effect. New wavebands of observation, UV, X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy. Radioastronomy: supernova remnants, pulsars, neutron stars. Radiogalaxies, active galactic nuclei, quasars. Theories of the origin of cosmic rays. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5453. Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3113 or 4303 or permission of instructor. Basic properties of stars. Review of observational tools for extragalactic work. Stellar content and interstellar medium in normal galaxies. Introduction to the theory of Big Bang cosmology. Comparison of observational data to cosmological predictions. The extragalactic distance scale and the age of the universe. Large scale structure: galaxy clusters and superclusters. Active galaxies -- radio galaxies and quasars. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5463. Stellar Atmospheres.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4303 or permission of instructor. Local thermodynamic equilibrium. Radiative transfer, continuous absorption coefficient and model stellar atmospheres. Atomic and molecular spectroscopy and the quantitative analysis of stellar spectra. Atomic processes and departures from local thermodynamic equilibrium. Extended and expanding atmospheres, novae, supernovae. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5473. Stellar Interiors.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4303 or permission of instructor. Evolution and energy balance of stars including gravitational attraction, nucleosynthesis, radiative and convective energy, transport and equilibrium, construction of stellar models for pre-main sequence and main sequence stars, and the theory of giants and white dwarfs. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5513. Interstellar Medium.3 Credit Hours.

4303 or permission. Processes in low-density media are explored, including the physics relevant to emission line objects such as HII and HI regions, molecular clouds, and active galaxies. Techniques for deriving chemical abundances are explored, as are interstellar absorption by gas and dust and radiation transfer. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5523. Advanced Observatory Methods.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2513 and 3103. Techniques of multiwavelength observational astronomy. Includes time and coordinates, physics of astronomical ccds, telescopes, photometry, extinction correction, technical feasibility calculations, optical spectroscopy, and x-ray astronomy. Introductions to gamma-ray, infrared, UV radio astronomy. No student may earn credit for both 4523 and 5523. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5900. Seminar in Astrophysics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. A research seminar devoted to the study of specialized topics in astronomy and astrophysics. Topics selected will reflect the interest of the instructor and students. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

ASTR 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

ASTR 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PHYS 1114. General Physics for Non-Science Majors.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: high school algebra II. Not open to students who intend to do major work in mathematics or physical science. Not open to students with credit in 1205, 2414 or 2514. Concepts of force, energy, matter, atomic physics, electricity, light, presented as a part of a liberal education. (F, Sp, Su) [II-NL] .

PHYS 1205. Introductory Physics I for Physics Majors.5 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: enrollment in Mathematics 1823 or 1914 or permission of instructor. To be taken by physics, astronomy and engineering physics majors during the first semester of their freshman year. Kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, many-particle systems, rigid body rotation, simple harmonic motion. Laboratory is an integral part of the course. Laboratory (F) [II-LAB].

PHYS 1215. Introductory Physics II for Physics Majors.5 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1205 or permission of instructor. Electricity and magnetism: static fields and forces, circuits, electromagnetic induction. Thermodynamics: the First and Second Laws, temperature, heat, work and entropy. Laboratory is an integral part of the course. Laboratory (Sp)

PHYS 1311. General Physics Lab I.1 Credit Hour.

Corequisite: 2414 or 2514. Experiments in basic law of mechanics and thermodynamics. (F, Sp, Su) [II-LAB] .

PHYS 1321. General Physics Lab II.1 Credit Hour.

Corequisite: 2424 or 2524. Experiments in basic laws of electricity, magnetism, and optics. (F, Sp, Su) [II-LAB] .

PHYS 1453. Musical Acoustics.3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the science of sound and its propagation with special emphasis on the production of sound by musical instruments and the voice, psychological aspects of sound perception, and room acoustics. Topics are explored through lectures, demonstrations, and discussions. No previous musical experience or proficiency is required. Not for major credit. (F) [II-NL] .

PHYS 2203. Introductory Physics III: Modern Physics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1215 or 2524 (or concurrent enrollment), or permission of instructor. An introduction to and overview of key concepts in contemporary physics, with emphasis on the contrast between classical and modern ways of thinking about the physical universe. Includes an introduction to selected major subject areas, which might include light and optics, relativity, atoms and molecules, the solid state, nuclei, elementary particles, fundamental interactions, cosmology and/or chaos. Students will also explore selected topics in current physics research. (F)

PHYS 2303. Electronics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1215 or 2524 (or concurrent enrollment), or permission of instructor. An introduction to the characteristics of semiconductor electronic components and their use in the design and operation of practical analog and digital electronic circuits. The emphasis will be on gaining a working knowledge of basic circuits and preparation for understanding and building electronic circuits encountered by experimental research physicists. (F)

PHYS 2414. General Physics for Life Science Oriented Majors.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1523 or 1743. Not open to students with credit in 1205 or 2514. Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, gravitation, equilibrium, momentum, energy, static and flowing fluids, kinetic theory, heat and thermodynamics, vibrations, waves and sound. (F, Sp, Su) [II-NL].

PHYS 2424. General Physics for Life Science Oriented Majors.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2414. Not open to students with credit in 1215 or 2524. Electric charge, electric field, electric potential, energy, DC and AC currents, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction, geometrical optics, wave nature of light, optical instruments, early quantum theory, models of the atom, the nucleus, radioactivity, nuclear reactions and nuclear energy. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 2514. General Physics for Engineering and Science Majors.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 1823 or Mathematics 1914 with grade of C or better. Not open to students with credit in 1205. Vectors, kinematics and dynamics of particles, work and energy systems of particles, rotational kinematics and dynamics, oscillations, gravitation, fluid mechanics, waves. (F, Sp, Su) [II-NL] .

PHYS 2524. General Physics for Engineering and Science Majors.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PHYS 2514 and MATH 2423 or MATH 2924 with grade of C or better. Not open to students with credit in PHYS 1215. Temperature, heat, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, optics. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 2970. Selected Topics in Physics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PHYS 3043. Physical Mechanics I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1205 or 2514, and Mathematics 3113 or 3413 (or concurrent enrollment); or permission of instructor. Differential equations based continuum mechanics: Newtonian particle mechanics, driven and damped oscillations, vibrations and waves, and their application to other linear systems, non-linear oscillations, introduction to Lagrange's equations. (Sp)

PHYS 3053. Physical Mechanics II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3043 or permission of instructor. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian dynamics. Non-inertial reference frames. Rigid body motion. Central forces and collisions. Special relativity. (F)

PHYS 3183. Electricity and Magnetism I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2203, Mathematics 3413 or concurrent enrollment; or permission of instructor. Electrostatics, dielectrics, continuity conditions, magnetic forces and fields, magnetic induction, magnetization, Maxwell's equations. (F)

PHYS 3223. Modern Physics for Engineers.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 3113 or equivalent. Relativity, atomic structure, nuclear theory, wave mechanics, statistical physics, solid state physics. (F)

PHYS 3302. Advanced Lab I.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2303 or permission of instructor. Junior-level experiments in physics. (F, Sp)

PHYS 3312. Advanced Lab II.2 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3302 or permission of instructor. Junior-level experiments in physics. (F, Sp)

PHYS 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 3803. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PHYS 3043 and MATH 3413 or permission of instructor. Fundamental ideas of quantum physics. Postulates of quantum theory, wave functions, operators, the Schrodinger equation, one-dimensional systems. Mathematical tools of quantum mechanics. Theory of measurement. Stationary and nonstationary states. (Sp)

PHYS 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will consist of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. Covers materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. The projects covered will vary. Deals with concepts not usually presented in regular coursework. (Su)

PHYS 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Provides an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS G4153. Statistical Physics and Thermodynamics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3803. Statistical properties of physical systems. Entropy and temperature, the Boltzmann distribution, Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein gases. Thermodynamic functions. Statistical interpretation of thermodynamics. (F)

PHYS G4183. Electricity and Magnetism II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3183. Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic wave equations, propagation of electromagnetic waves, reflection and refraction, radiation. (Sp)

PHYS 4213. Nuclear and Particle Physics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5213) Prerequisite: 3803. Basic nuclear structure, nuclear models, radioactivity, nuclear reactions. Particle interactions and families, quark model, weak decays of quarks and leptons. No student may earn credit for both 4213 and 5213. (F)

PHYS 4223. Modern Optics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5223) Prerequisite: junior standing. Geometric optics, physical optics, nonlinear optics, optical devices, interference, coherence theory, absorption and emission of light by matter and quantum optics. No student may earn credit for both 4223 and 5223. (Irreg.)

PHYS 4243. Solid State Physics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5243) Prerequisite: 3803. Crystal structure, electrons in simple metals, electron band theory, semiconductors, superconductivity, phonons. No student may earn credit for both 4243 and 5243. (Sp)

PHYS 4300. Senior Research Project.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: senior standing in major and permission of instructor. May be repeated once. Research project, experimental or theoretical, to be arranged with individual faculty, leading to a senior thesis. Group seminars to discuss projects and other topics of current interest in physics and astronomy. Total of four hours required for general education capstone. (F, Sp) [V] .

PHYS 4310. Senior Research Project I.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. Research project, experimental or theoretical, to be arranged with individual faculty, leading to a senior thesis. Group seminars to discuss projects and other topics of current interest in physics and astronomy. Total of four hours between PHYS 4310 and PHYS 4320 are required. (F, Sp) [V].

PHYS 4320. Senior Research Project II.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: PHYS 4310. A continuation of the research project, experimental or theoretical, arranged with individual faculty, producing a senior thesis. Group seminars to discuss projects and other topics of current interest in physics and astronomy. Total of four hours between PHYS 4310 and PHYS 4320 are required. (F, Sp) [V].

PHYS G4803. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3803 or permission of instructor. Quantum mechanics of three-dimensional systems. Angular momentum. Approximation methods: perturbation theory, variational methods. Time-dependent perturbations: transition rates, selection rules. Interaction of radiation with matter. Applications. Quantum mechanics of atoms and molecules. (F)

PHYS 4813. Atomic and Molecular Physics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5813) Prerequisite: 4803. Hydrogen atom: fine structure and external field effects. Many-electron atoms. Interaction with radiation. Molecular bonding. Spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. No student may earn credit for both 4813 and 5813. (Sp)

PHYS 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

PHYS 4970. Seminar-Selected Topics in Physics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject; maximum credit six hours. (Irreg.)

PHYS 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied,permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 5000. Introduction to Graduate Studies in Physics.0 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. The course is an introduction to research in general as well as specific research done within the department. It will familiarize students with departmental procedures, improve their teaching of Physics, and convey the expectations and demands of a career in Physics or Astronomy. (F)

PHYS 5013. Mathematical Methods in Physics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Orthogonal transformations and tensor analysis; partial differential equations and special functions: spherical harmonics, Bessel functions, SHO and hydrogen atom wave functions; theory of complex variables; integral definition of special functions. (F)

PHYS 5153. Classical Mechanics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3053 or equivalent. Hamilton's principle, Lagrange's equations, mechanics of particles and rigid bodies, Hamilton's equations, canonical transformations, Poisson brackets. (F)

PHYS 5163. Statistical Mechanics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4153 or equivalent. Ensembles and thermodynamics, fluctuations, monatomic crystals, ideal gases, phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium in ideal gas mixtures, ideal gas in an electric field, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statistics, blackbody radiation, electrons in metals. (Sp)

PHYS 5213. Nuclear and Particle Physics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4213) Prerequisite: 4803; graduate standing. Basic nuclear structure, nuclear models, radioactivity, nuclear reactions. Particle interactions and families, quark model, weak decays of quarks and leptons. No student may earn credit for both 4213 and 5213. (F)

PHYS 5223. Modern Optics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4223) Prerequisite: junior standing. Geometric optics, physical optics, nonlinear optics, optical devices, interference, coherence theory, absorption and emission of light by matter and quantum optics. No student may earn credit for both 4223 and 5223. (Irreg.)

PHYS 5243. Solid State Physics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4243) Prerequisite: 4803; graduate standing. Crystal structure, electrons in simple metals, electron band theory, semiconductors, superconductivity, phonons. No student may earn credit for both 4243 and 5243. (Sp)

PHYS 5393. Quantum Mechanics I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4803 or equivalent. Topics in nonrelativistic quantum mechanics including the Heisenberg and Schroedinger pictures, Dirac formalism, angular momentum, bound states of spherically symmetric potentials, time independent perturbation theory; potential scattering. (Sp)

PHYS 5403. Quantum Mechanics II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5393. Time-dependent perturbation theory, electromagnetic interactions, spin and angular momentum coupling, symmetry and statistics, density matrix, multiparticle systems. (F)

PHYS 5573. Electrodynamics I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4183 or equivalent. Topics covered include special relativity; 3+1 and 4-dimensional Maxwell theory; charged particle and electromagnetic field Langrangians; conservation of energy, momentum and angular momentum; delta function sources and Green's function for Maxwell's theory. (F)

PHYS 5583. Electrodynamics II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5573. Topics include: applications of advanced and retarded Green's functions to time-dependent electric and magnetic dipoles, and acceleration point charges; synchotron radiation; Bremsstrahlung; radiation damping and classical renormalization. (Sp)

PHYS 5813. Quantum Mechanics of Atoms.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4813) Prerequisite: 4803; graduate standing. Hydrogen atom: fine structure and external field effects. Many-electron atoms. Interaction with radiation. Molecular bonding. Spectroscopy of diatomic molecules. No student may earn credit for both 4813 and 5813. (Sp)

PHYS 5910. Problems in Natural Science.1-2 Credit Hours.

1 to 2 hours. Prerequisite: admission to candidacy for degree of Master of Natural Science. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 5970. Seminar--Selected Topics in Modern Physics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit for master's degree six hours, for doctor's degree 12 hours. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

Variable enrollment, two to nine hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, four hours. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 5990. Special Studies.1-4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 12 hours of physics, permission. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit for a master's degree four hours, for a doctor's degree ten hours. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 6213. Advanced Particle Physics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5213, 5403 or equivalents. The theory and phenomenology of the "standard model" of particle physics which encompasses the electro-weak and strong interactions. Topics will include: symmetries, groups and conservation laws; bound states, quarkonium; Feynman diagrams, QED; QCD; weak interactions; gauge theories. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6243. Advanced Solid State Physics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4243, 5403, or equivalents. The physics of metals, semiconductors and insulators. Free electron theory, crystal structure and phonons, electron band theory, semiclassical model, applications to electronic and optical properties of solids, effects of magnetic fields. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6283. Advanced Atomic/Molecular Physics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5403, 5813, or equivalents. Calculation and evaluation of electronic wave functions for atoms and molecules via Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction methods; the Born-Oppenheimer approximation and ro-vibrational wave functions; molecular quantum states and group theory; fine and hyperfine structure. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6333. General Relativity.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5013, 5583. The mathematical and physical basis for the relativistic theory of gravitation; the principle of equivalence; tensor analysis; Einstein's field equations; tests of general relativity; gravitational collapse; cosmology; toward a quantum theory of gravity. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6433. Quantum Field Theory.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5403. Canonical quantization of scalar and spinor fields; perturbation theory and Feynman diagrams; renormalization; path integral formulation; renormalization group; gauge fields with selected applications to QED, electro-weak theory and QCD. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6443. Advanced Quantum Field Theory.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing and 6433. Path integral quantization; renormalization; renormalization group equations; gauge theories of strong and electroweak interactions. (F)

PHYS 6851. Seminar on Solid State Physics.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. A research seminar devoted to the study of specialized topics in solid state physics. Topics selected will reflect the interests of instructor and students. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6860. Advanced Topics in Mathematical Methods in Physics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 5013 or permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Topics covered will be selected by instructor and announced prior to the term in which it will be offered. The course is intended to offer material currently used in theoretical physics. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Directed readings and/or literature review under the direction of a faculty member. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PHYS 6980. Research for Doctoral Dissertation.2-16 Credit Hours.

Research For Doctoral Dissertation. (F, Sp, Su)

PHYS 6990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

Faculty

Last Name First/Middle Name Middle init. OU Service start Title(s), date(s) appointed Degrees Earned, Schools, Dates Completed
Abbott Braden K 2000 PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2013 PhD, Purdue, 1994; MS, Purdue, 1992; BA, Univ of Minnesota Morris, 1989
Abraham Eric R 1998 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2004; L.J. SEMROD PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2005; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS PhD, Rice Univ, 1996; BA, St. Olaf College, 1991
Baer Howard A 2008 HOMER L. DODGE CHAIR IN HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS, 2008; GEORGE LYNN CROSS RESEARCH PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2014 PhD, Univ of Wisconsin, 1984; MS, Univ of Wisconsin, 1981; BS, Univ of Wisconsin, 1979
Baron Edward A 1990 GEORGE LYNN CROSS RESEARCH PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2011 PhD, Stony Brook Univ; 1985; MA, Stony Brook Univ, 1982; BA, Univ of Pennsylvania, 1980
Biederman Grant ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS PhD, Stanford Univ, 2007; MS, Yale Univ, 2002; BS, Univ of Oklahoma, 2001
Blume Doerte 2017 PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2017 PhD, Georg-August Univ, 1998; BS, Georg-August Univ, 1995
Bumm Lloyd A 2001 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2007; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS PhD, Northwestern Univ, 1991; BS, Clarkson Univ, 1982
Dai Xinyu 2011 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2017 PhD, Penn State Univ, 2004; BS, Peking Univ, 1998
Gutierrez Phillip 1989 PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2001; PROFESSOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS PhD, Univ of California Riverside, 1983; MS, Univ of California Riverside, 1980; BS, Univ of California Riverside, 1976
Kaib Nathan 2015 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2015 PhD, Univ of Washington, 2010; BS, Case Western Reserve Univ, 2002
Kao Chung 2000 PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2013 PhD, Univ of Texas, 1990; MS, Univ of Oregon, 1985; BS, National Taiwan Norman Univ, 1980
Kilic Mukremin 2011 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2017 PhD, Univ of Texas, 2006; BS, Bogazici Univ, 1999
Leighly Karen M 2000 PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2013 PhD, Montana State Univ, 1991; MS, Montana State Univ, 1987; BS, New Mexico Inst Mining & Tech, 1983
Marino Valle Alberto 2012 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2012; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS PhD, Univ of Rochester, 2006; MS, Univ of Rochester, 2002; BS, Universidad de Monterrey, 1998
Mason Bruce A 1989 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 1995 PhD, Univ of Maryland, 1985; MS, Univ of Maryland, BA, Oberlin College, 1980
Mullen Kieran J 1994 PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2007; PRESIDENT'S ASSOCIATES PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2009 PhD, Univ of Michigan, 1989; BS, Georgetown Univ, 1982
Munshi Ferah A 2017 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2017 PhD, Univ of Washington, 2013; MS, Univ of Washington, 2010; BA, Univ of California Berkeley, 2007
Santos Michael B 1993 SAMUEL ROBERTS NOBLE PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 1997; TED AND CUBA WEBB PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2003; PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2004; CHARLES L. BLACKBURN CHAIR IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS, 2006 PhD, Princeton Univ, 1992; MA, Princeton Univ, 1989; BS, Cornell Univ, 1986
Schwettmann Arne 2014 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2014; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS PhD, Univ of Oklahoma, 2012; MS, Univ of North Texas, 2003; BS, Universität Hannover, 2001
Sellers Ian R 2011 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2017 PhD, Univ of Sheffield, 2004; MS, Imperial College London, 2000; B Eng, Univ of Liverpool, 1999
Sinha Kuver 2017 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2017; CARL T. BUSH PROFESSOR OF THEORETICAL PHYSICS, 2017 PhD, Rutgers Univ, 2008
Strauss Michael G 1995 CARLISLE AND LURLINE MABREY PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2006; DAVID ROSS BOYD PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2012; PROFESSOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS PhD, Univ of California Los Angeles, 1988; MS, Univ of California Los Angeles, 1983; BS, Biola Univ, 1981
Stupak John 2016 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2016; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS PhD, SUNY at Stonybrook, 2012; BS, Fairfield Univ, 2007
Uchoa Bruno ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS; TED AND CUBA WEBB PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR PhD, State Univ of Campinas, 2004; BS, State Univ of Campinas, 1997
White Daniel R 2018 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2018 PhD, Ohio State Univ, 2016; BS, Univ of Oklahoma, 2008
Wisniewski John P 2012 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY, 2012; PRESIDENT'S ASSOCIATES PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2016 PhD, Univ of Toledo, 2005; MS, Univ of Toledo, 2002; BS, Univ of Wisconsin, 1999