Department of History

Elyssa Faison, Chair
Kathleen Brosnan, Director of Graduate Studies
Adam Malka, Director of Undergraduate Studies
403-A Dale Hall Tower
455 W. Lindsey Street
Norman, OK 73019-2004
Phone: (405) 325-6002
FAX: (405) 325-4503
www.ou.edu/cas/history

General Information

The study of History has always claimed a place at the center of a liberal arts education. By understanding the experiences of people who lived in the near and distant past, students gain a far sharper perspective on their own place in the world. Knowing the past enhances our capacity to understand the present and imagine the future. History also sharpens our research and writing skills and hones our ability to think critically and imaginatively.

Studying the past -- whether it’s near or distant, foreign or familiar -- is fascinating. History Majors at the University of Oklahoma work closely with faculty distinguished for both teaching and research. The research, analytical, and writing skills that History majors develop help them advance in a wide range of careers. History majors pursue careers in fields such as law, public service, business, journalism, information management, military service, or medicine. Others use their historical expertise and knowledge of other cultures more directly as teachers, museum curators, public historians, workers in non-profit agencies, or Peace Corps volunteers. Some go on to graduate school to become professional historians. Numerous government agencies such as the Foreign Service, CIA, FBI, national and state parks, the Peace Corps, and social services have positions for history graduates. Other hiring institutions include business corporations, educational institutions, the travel and tourism industry, the media (newspapers, journals, TV and film), museums, foundations, and public relations firms. History is an excellent major for students wishing to go on to law school. Graduates with liberal arts degrees (including history) are prime candidates for executive training programs in private business. They may become archivists, curators, consultants, analysts, criminologists, genealogists, librarians, lawyers, teachers, researchers, writers, or publishers. In addition to the many career benefits, history majors will discover that their studies give them the perspective to participate more fully in the world around them.

Programs & Facilities

Schusterman Center for Judaic and Israel Studies

The Schusterman Center is housed within the Department of History. The center offers an undergraduate major in Judaic Studies and a minor in Judaic & Israel Studies through the Department of History, and a Hebrew language minor through the Department of Modern Languages, Literatures and Linguistics. Graduate students may select a major field in Judaic/Israel History through the Department of History's graduate program. The programming and scholarship opportunities of the Schusterman Center are interdisciplinary and serve as bridge from history to other departments and colleges at the University.

Internship Program

The History Department’s Service Learning Internship Program is one of only six service learning credit opportunities on the OU Norman campus. The program’s mission is to provide History majors with hands-on experience analyzing, organizing, preserving and/or presenting history for and to the public. We place undergraduate interns at local historical organizations and agencies every spring, summer and fall semester. We are proud to coordinate with our site sponsors at organizations such as the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum, the Oklahoma Historical Society, the Oklahoma Department of Libraries and on-campus opportunities with Bizzell Memorial Library.

Scholarships and Financial Aid

  • Annual Awards and Fellowships - for outstanding undergraduate and graduate students
  • Other Funds - for conference travel and research are available on a competitive basis from the Department of History, the Graduate College, the Dodge College of Arts and Sciences, and the Graduate Student Senate.  Students should consult those offices or (in the case of graduate students) the Director of Graduate Studies for application information.

Undergraduate Study

The History Department allows majors to tailor their upper-division coursework to reflect their historical interests. As a major, you will choose from two tracks: The Traditional Major offers a variety of geographic, chronological, and thematic perspectives. The Field of Concentration major allows you to focus on a particular region (like the U.S. or Asia) or theme (like Women's and Gender History or History of War, Revolution, and Diplomacy). Whichever track you choose, you will progress through three small seminars designed to teach you the skills that are central to our discipline: HIST 2573 (History Sleuth); HIST 3573 (The Junior Colloquium); and HIST 4973 (The Senior Capstone). Because each of these courses builds on its predecessor, you are strongly encouraged to take them in order.

If you have any questions about majoring or minoring in history, please contact our Director of Undergraduate Studies, Dr. Adam Malka. You can also visit the Undergraduate Studies page of our website.
 

  • History, Bachelor of Arts
    History majors choose from two tracks: the Traditional Major offers a variety of geographic, chronological, and thematic perspectives; and the Field of Concentration major focuses on a particular region or theme.
     
  • History Minor
    Students majoring in other subjects may elect to minor in history.

Graduate Study

The Department of History at the University of Oklahoma offers premier graduate programs in the history of the American West, Native American History, Latin American History, Environmental History, Transnational Women's and Gender History, and Judaic History. Our faculty are leaders: They publish books and articles that help define their fields. They serve as officers in professional organizations. And they offer close, one-to-one mentoring to students working toward both the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees.

Our graduate students benefit from special fellowships, travel and research support, innovative lecture series, and a dynamic sense of purpose. They have garnered an impressive range of nationally and internationally competitive research fellowships and pre- and post-doctoral fellowships. Our program also boasts an excellent placement record: Our graduates have built successful careers as tenure-track professors at research universities and liberal arts colleges; public historians; and scholarly editors.

We offer our students unparalleled research resources. The University of Oklahoma’s Bizzell Library has over 2.5 million books, more than 1.6 million government publications, over 3 million pieces of microform, and subscribes to 16,000 journals. The University is also home to the Western History Collections, one of the most important facilities in the world for the study of Native American, Western American, and Environmental History. It contains 65,000 books, 10,000 cubic feet of manuscripts, and nearly 2 million photographic images. The manuscript collection of the Carl Albert Center houses the papers of many public figures important to the American West. The Charles M. Russell Center for the Study of the Art of the American West provides access to an extensive collection of books, manuscripts, theses and dissertations, periodicals and journals, artist files, and slides on western American and Native American art. The Sam Noble Natural History Museum, one of the nation’s largest connected to either a public or private university, offers rich research opportunities for those interested in studying Native American, Western American, and environmental history. Finally, the Oklahoma Historical Society, in Oklahoma City, offers access to thousands of documents.

Master of Arts

The department offers a thesis and a non-thesis option for the Master of Arts degree in History.

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

The Doctor of Philosophy Degree is offered primarily in one of the department's core areas. Detailed information may be obtained from the graduate liaison of the department and by visiting our website.

Courses

HIST 1101. The Experience of War.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: permission of the department. Introduces students (veterans) to the history and literature of war through a discussion of the Civil War and Vietnam. Encourages veterans to use the humanities and their own experiences to think about, and express their thoughts on, war as experienced by others and by themselves through history. (F) [IV-WC] .

HIST 1113. History of Medieval Europe.3 Credit Hours.

History of Europe from the fall of Rome to the end of the 15th century. Emphasis on the development of social structures and culture forms, and the sociocultural background of political and religious developments. (F, Sp)

HIST 1223. Europe, 1500 to 1815.3 Credit Hours.

An introductory survey of Europe in the early modern period. Topics include the Reformation, development of the nation-state, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution and Napoleon. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 1233. Europe since 1815.3 Credit Hours.

An introductory survey of Europe from 1815 to the present. Examines the major political, economic, social and cultural trends in the major countries and European foreign affairs and overseas expansion. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 1303. The History of Disease.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213/Expository Writing 1213 or permission of instructor. Examines contagious disease in the 20th century. It explores a time period-- following the discovery of antibiotics-- in which biomedicine seemed invincible. The course, as it moves later into the 20th century, when the AIDS virus and resistance to antibiotics turned contagion into a new, and thoroughly modern, threat. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 1483. United States to 1865.3 Credit Hours.

A general survey of United States history to the end of the Civil War, with emphasis upon national political, diplomatic, economic, constitutional, social and intellectual developments. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-US].

HIST 1493. United States, 1865 to the Present.3 Credit Hours.

A general survey of United States history from the Civil War to the present day, with emphasis upon national political, diplomatic, economic, constitutional, social and intellectual developments. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-US].

HIST 1543. Introduction to American Indian History.3 Credit Hours.

A history of American Indian people in North America and their role in shaping American history through the early 1970's. Emphasis will be on how cultural values influenced Indian-European interactions and how cultures change over time. (F, Sp) [IV-WDC].

HIST 1563. The Jews: From Abraham to Zionism.3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to both the basics of Jewish history and the different disciplinary inquiries into the Jewish experience. The course covers biblical, rabbinic, medieval and modern Jewries in the ways in the ancestral homeland (e.g. Israel) and in the diaspora (e.g. other lands in which Jews settled). (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 1573. The Artists' Bible - From Mosaics to Graphic Novels.3 Credit Hours.

The Artists' Bible presents major artistic movements. Students explore mosaics, paintings, architecture, sculpture, graphic novels that expand the Bible's compact language. We begin with Genesis and end with Revelation. We focus primarily on western art with Middle Eastern counterexamples. Female and male characters will be analyzed. Overviews the Bible and artistic tradition. Involves analysis of biblical passages that invited visualization. (F) [IV-AF].

HIST 1613. Western Civilization I.3 Credit Hours.

History and culture of western civilization from origins of Greek society to end of religious wars in seventeenth century. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 1623. Western Civilization II.3 Credit Hours.

History and culture of western civilization between 1660 and the present. Emphasis will be placed on western institutions and ideas, their evolution, and their influence elsewhere. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 1723. East Asia to 1600.3 Credit Hours.

A general survey of the histories of China and Japan with the history of Korea included as it bears upon the historyof Japan. The focus is on the political, social, economic, and intellectual aspects of China and Japan, and their points of contact. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 1733. East Asia Since 1600.3 Credit Hours.

A general survey of the histories of China, Japan, and Korea from 1600 to the present. Focus is on the political, social, and economic systems of these countries, major historical events and intra-Asian interactions. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 1923. World Civilization 1600-Present.3 Credit Hours.

Deals with the entire globe rather than with one country or region; deals with all peoples, not just with so-called Western or non-Western peoples. Focuses on historical forces or movements of worldwide influence. Comparative history. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 2013. Ancient Near Eastern Civilizations.3 Credit Hours.

A study of the major civilizations of the Ancient Near East from the last Pluvial period (ca. 8400 B.C.) through the first millennium B.C., with particular emphasis on the historic periods (ca. 3000 B.C. onwards). (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 2033. Introduction to Digital Humanities.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with LIS, WGS and HSTM 2033) This course introduces students to digital and/or computational methods in the humanities and addresses critical questions about the role of digital technology in society. This is a collaborative, hands-on, project-based course. (Sp)

HIST 2063. History of Activism.3 Credit Hours.

This course explores the history of activism in the twentieth century, paying particular attention to the ways race, ethnicity, class, and gender have shaped political, economic, environmental and health injustices and community responses to them. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 2103. Genocides in Modern History.3 Credit Hours.

Globally comparative course introduces students to the types and causes of genocide in the modern era. Focus is on various case studies of exterminatory mass violence, in order to analyze evolutions and patterns in transnational historical contexts, as well as consider methods of resistance and prevention. (Irreg.)

HIST 2123. The Holocaust.3 Credit Hours.

Discussion of the Holocaust, how it could happen and how it is remembered today in different European and non-European countries. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 2333. The British Empire.3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the development of the British Empire and Commonwealth to the present day. Emphasis upon the period after the American Revolution; includes extension of control in Asia and Africa, movements of independence, the emergence of the Commonwealth and mid-twentieth-century challenges to the Commonwealth. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 2503. American Jews/Jewish Americans.3 Credit Hours.

Through a case study of American Jewry, this class will ask: How to define a minority (religion, race, ethnicity)?. How does a group create lasting institutions? How does a group become American yet retain communal identity? How can a minority shape majority culture? What constitutes "success"? (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 2573. The History Sleuth.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: majors only or permission of department. Introduces students to the craft of history. Students will explore the many types of sources available to reconstruct the past and learn how historians collect, select, and evaluate historical evidence. (F, Sp)

HIST 2613. Colonial Hispanic American History, 1492-1810.3 Credit Hours.

The founding and development of the Spanish and Portuguese empires in America with special attention to the conquest of native civilizations and to the political, economic, social and intellectual institutions of the colonial period. (F, Su) [IV-WC].

HIST 2623. Modern Latin America 1810-Present.3 Credit Hours.

The emancipation and development of the Spanish-American nations (and of Brazil) with special attention to the movements for national independence, political unification, economic developments and social welfare. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 2703. African Societies and Cultures.3 Credit Hours.

Explores the complexity and divergence of African societies and cultures, political organizations, social structures, traditions and artistic expressions created by Africans over time and introduces Africa's history after 1500, its cultural diversity, and political transformation. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 2713. Survey of African Civilization.3 Credit Hours.

Survey of the social, economic, political and cultural development of sub-Saharan African peoples from the emergence of human society to the present. (F) [IV-WDC].

HIST 2723. History of South Asia.3 Credit Hours.

The course examines South Asia, which refers to the vast geographical space stretching from the Himalayan mountain ranges in the north to the Indian Ocean in the south and from the valley of the Indus in the west to the plains of the Brahmaputra in the east. Students examine the histories, cultures and societies of these spaces. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 2803. Survey of Russia.3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the history of Russia from its beginnings to the present day. Intended primarily for nonspecialists. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 2970. Special Topics.3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

HIST 3003. History of Sparta.3 Credit Hours.

Traces the history of Sparta from its antecedents in the Heroic Age through the Dorian Invasion to the Roman conquest.(Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3023. Classical Greece.3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the history of ancient Greece during its "Classical" Period, the fifth and fourth centuries B.C., with emphasis upon Athens, Sparta and Alexander the Great (C. 500-300 B.C.). (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3033. Black Britain in the Long Nineteenth Century.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing, or permission of instructor. This course explores the history of Black people in Britain from the late eighteenth century to the end of the First World War. Through this, students uncover the ways those of African descent shaped British history and yet were excluded from its narratives. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3043. Egypt and Mesopotamia.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. A study of the ancient histories and cultures, literatures, religious thought, political ideas, and art. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3053. Medieval Italy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or 1613 or junior standing. A survey of Italy from circa 400-1350 CE, emphasizing the mix of Roman, Christian, and barbarian traditions, relations between the church and empire, and the role of cities and commerce. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3060. Topics in Medieval History.1-5 Credit Hours.

1 to 5 hours. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Discussion of a selected special problem or problems in medieval history. (F, Sp)

HIST 3063. The Ancient Art of War.3 Credit Hours.

Traces the history of warfare from its origins through the ancient world to the beginning of the Middle Ages. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3073. The Renaissance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1223 or HIST 1613 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the European Renaissance, a time period that was crucial to the development of western European culture, intellectual thought, and state formation. By reviving classical antiquity, the Renaissance created both the classical canon of intellectual study and modern political units. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3083. The American Colonies.3 Credit Hours.

A history of the British colonies in North America from the earliest discoveries and of the United States from the Second Continental Congress to the inauguration of Washington in 1789. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3093. The Revolutionary Era.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. The American Revolution and the development of political institutions under the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution; innovations of the Federalists; domestic and foreign affairs. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3103. Slavery in World History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Examines slavery and unfree labor from the earliest times in Mesopotamia to the present and includes an analysis of slavery in the American South and Latin America. Also traces the history of the Abolition Movement. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3113. The Crusades.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or 1613 or junior standing. Covers crusades to the Holy Land and Europe against Moors, pagans, heretics, and enemies of the Pope. Topics include crusade ideology, relations between Latins, Byzantines, Jews and Muslims, crusader states, techniques of warfare, and the experience of crusading. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3120. Topics in Modern European History.1-5 Credit Hours.

1 to 5 hours. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Discussion of a selected special problem or problems in modern European history. (Irreg.)

HIST 3123. War in European History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL/EXPO 1213 or junior standing or permission of instructor. A study of the impact of war on European history and the interaction of armies and society in the period from the fourteenth century to the present. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3133. Medieval Women.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with WGS 3133) Prerequisite: 1113 or 1613 or junior standing. Covers social history of women in western Europe from late Antiquity to the late Middle Ages. Topics include stages of life, marriage, families, occupation, law, power, health, religion, love, and education. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3143. The Era of the Reformation.3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the forces leading to the religious upheaval in the sixteenth century and the spread of Protestantism in Northern European countries; the Catholic Reformation or Reaction; Thirty Years War; and the relation of the Reformation Era to medieval and modern civilization. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3153. The Great War, 1914-18.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1233 or 1623. Examines the causes, conduct, and consequences of World War I, with primary emphasis on its cultural impact. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3163. Europe from the French Revolution to Napoleon.3 Credit Hours.

A social, political, military and cultural treatment of Europe from 1789 to 1815. Appropriate attention will also be given to causes of the French Revolution. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3173. The Early U.S. Republic.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course surveys the 35 years of U.S. history after the War of 1812. We will examine the rise of a modern political parties; the creation of an American empire; the expansion of slavery; the violence of Indian removal; the dramatic political battles of Jacksonian America; the far-reaching impact of evangelical Christianity; and the development and evolution of American prosperity. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3183. Italy: Making a Nation?.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1233 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Course examines the creation of modern Italy from the late Renaissance, Enlightenment, nationalism, the unification movement, World War I and World War II. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3193. Modern France: Gender, Religion and Nation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1623 or HIST 1233 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course surveys key events and ideals that have shaped the modern nation of France. We will engage literature, history, film, and sociology to develop a more nuanced understanding of France and its place in the world. We will focus particularly on the roles played by gender and religious identities in constructing or complicating definitions of French citizenship. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3203. Transformation of Jews.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Introduces students to the era of emancipation in modern Europe and will discuss Jewish approaches to become integrated and assimilated in the different emerging nation states. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3213. Intellectual History of Nineteenth-Century Europe.3 Credit Hours.

Examination of the impact on European social and political development of concepts such as Nationalism, Imperialism, Socialism and Darwinism. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3223. Intellectual History of Twentieth-Century Europe.3 Credit Hours.

A general survey of the major intellectual developments in Western Europe since 1900, including the areas of social thought, religious thought, political philosophy, scientific thought, literature and drama. In each area the relationship of intellectual expression will be related to the historical context from which it emerged. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3233. Modern Spain.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing. Examines the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of modern Spanish history (1808-present) and will attempt to place Spain within the context of European history, where it has often been ignored by European historians. (F, Su) [IV-WC].

HIST 3243. European Women & Gender Relations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1233 or HIST 1623 or junior standing or permission of the instructor. Explores the social, cultural, political, and economic history of European women and gender relations from the Scientific Revolution to the present. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3253. Germany: From Bismarck to Hitler.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1233 or junior standing or permission of instructor. History of Germany during the 19th and 20th centuries, from the unification era to the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party. Topics include the Congress of Vienna, German unification, World War I, the rise of Nazism, and World War II. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3263. History of Public Health.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with HSTM 3263) Prerequisite: Junior Standing or a lower division HSCI course or HIST 1733 or HIST 2723 or Permission of Instructor. Taking an historical perspective students explore and analyze the social, economic, political and scientific events and processes that have shaped modern public health. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3273. Of Acupuncture, Medicine Men & Ayurveda: Indigenous & Non-Western Medicine in Perspective.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with HSTM 3273) Prerequisite: Junior standing or a lower division HSTM course or HIST 1733 or HIST 2723 or Permission of Instructor. Introduces histories of practices and systems of medicine and healing that are variously deemed "indigenous," "traditional," "non-western," "alternative," and "complementary" in historical context. Students critique the historical and cultural meaning of these terms, as well as their attendant conceptions of health, disease, and the body. (Sp) [IV-WDC] .

HIST 3283. History of Ireland, Part II.3 Credit Hours.

Examines the history of Ireland from 1600 to the present day. Looks at the British conquest of Ireland, subsequent Anglo-Irish relations, events leading to Irish independence, and the origins and causes of present day sectarian violence. (Sp-alternate) [IV-WC].

HIST 3290. Topics in British History.1-5 Credit Hours.

1 to 5 hours. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Discussion of a selected special problem or problems in British history. (Irreg.)

HIST 3293. Antisemitism.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Covers the world's oldest prejudice from ancient times to the present. Topics include Christian Antisemitism; medieval demonization of the Jews; Inquisition; Dreyfus case; pogroms; American Antisemitism; Nazism and Holocaust; Arab and Muslim Antisemitism; and African American Antisemitism. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3303. Mexico and the United States.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Explores the long and complicated relationship between these two nations. Explores economic investment, war, immigration, bilingualism, and culture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3313. Israeli Culture Through Film.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Introduces students to the Israeli culture in its modern day context of the young Jewish state. Focuses on the dynamic mosaic of this multi-faceted society which is still evolving. (Sp) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3323. Tudor England.3 Credit Hours.

A study of England from 1485 to 1603. Topics covered include the establishment of the Tudor dynasty, Tudor administrative and political development, the English Reformation, foreign and colonial relations, economic growth, and sixteenth-century social and cultural life. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3333. The Black West.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with AFAM 3333) Prerequisite: Junior standing, or any 2000-level African and African American Studies class, or permission of instructor. Survey of Black history and experience in the American West. Students will learn about life in the region through primary documents, scholarly texts, literature, film, and popular culture. Emphasis on how identity, regionalism, and nationalism converge in North America. Particular attention will be paid to Oklahoma and the larger Great Plains. (Irreg.)

HIST 3343. Eighteenth-Century England.3 Credit Hours.

A discussion of the domestic politics, society, economy, foreign affairs and constitutional and imperial development of England from the accession of the Hanoverians in 1714 to the passage of the First Reform Act of 1832. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3353. England Since 1832.3 Credit Hours.

Topical analysis of major developments in British life since 1832, including growth of political democracy, adaptation to industrialism, social and cultural change, foreign affairs, imperialism, growth of the welfare state. Britain's changed role in the twentieth century. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3363. Legal And Constitutional History Of England I.3 Credit Hours.

The first part of a course of lectures on the development of the English constitution, and of legal concepts, institutions and procedures from the Anglo-Saxons to the present. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3373. The Long Civil Rights Movement in America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing, or permission of instructor. This course treats the Civil Rights Movement as a century-long struggle. Using court cases as historical documents alongside other secondary and primary sources, it examines both the legal concept of civil rights as well as the activism of people who sought such rights. It concludes with an examination of the modern notions of civil rights. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3383. The American West.3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the economic, political, social and cultural development of the American West. Particular attention will be paid to the West as a frontier process and as a causative factor in historical change.(F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3393. History of Oklahoma.3 Credit Hours.

Meets the requirement in Oklahoma history for teacher's certificate. A survey of Oklahoma history from its beginning to the present, including its Indian background, formation into territories, achievement of statehood, and general cultural, economic and political development. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 3403. Modern Israel.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Introduces students to the history of modern Israel. They will learn about the Israeli people, politics & culture. The course will cover 100 years (1882-1982). (Irreg.)[IV-WDC].

HIST 3413. The History of Ancient Israel.3 Credit Hours.

A topical survey from 1400 B.C. to 425 A.D., dealing critically with the main institutions and their historical background from early tribal theocracy to the end of the Rabbinic Patriarchate under Rome. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3423. War, Prosperity and Depression.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of the instructor. Covers United States involvement in the two world wars; decline of socialism; youth culture; changing gender roles and relations; crisis of masculinity; transformation of work; consumerism; racism; antisemitism; depression and New Deal; and America's response to the Holocaust. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3430. Topics in United States History.1-5 Credit Hours.

1 to 5 hours. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Discussion of a selected problem or problems in United States history. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 3433. The United States in the Cold War Era, 1945-1980.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines changes taking place in American life during the second half of the twentieth century. Topics include the Cold War, McCarthyism, the New Frontier, Civil Rights Movement, protest in the 60s, the Vietnam War, and adaptations to a global economy. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 3443. Early North American West.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483. This course examines the early history (1200 CE to about 1850 CE) of North America. Topics include early indigenous societies, exploration and conquest, systems of slavery, and colonial and federal policies that led, finally, to the removal and relocation of indigenous nations from the early United States. The course concludes with an analysis of the west in the era sectionalism. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3453. The Modern North American West.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493. This course focuses upon the different peoples, resources, landscapes, and ideas that collided in the recent American West. Sometimes that contact was violent, sometimes loving, but always the the collision created an American story that has enormous influence today. This course concludes with an analysis of how the western past appears in the present. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3463. The Life of the Mind in America: to 1815.3 Credit Hours.

Main currents in American thought during the nation's first two centuries. How a uniquely American culture developed in response to a unique environment. Special topics: European intellectual background, early religious thought, the enlightenment, evolutionary ideology, racial thought, nationalism and the philosophic foundations of the new experiment in government. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3473. Life of the Mind in America: 1815 to 1877.3 Credit Hours.

Main currents in American thought during the nineteenth century. How American culture weathered the tests of expansion, sectionalism, Civil War and economic growth. Special topics: the ideology of American democracy, Romanticism and Transcendentalism, religion, reform, the debate over slavery, the impact of war and the intellectual defense of American capitalism. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3483. Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 1877-1917.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. The period from 1877 to 1917 included the fastest and most extensive industrial revolution in world history, the worst economic depression in U.S. history, the most violent episodes of industrial violence, the most radical agrarian protests, the greatest racial violence in the nation's history, the acquisition of an overseas empire, and intervention in the First World War. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3493. American Environmental History.3 Credit Hours.

Examine American attitudes toward the environment since the founding of American colonies, evolution of natural resource policies, and lives of prominent figures in the "conservation" and "ecology" movements of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3500. Special Topics in History.1-6 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Covers topics not covered in current course listings or specific geographic area topics courses. (F, Sp)

HIST 3503. The World War II Era, 1918-1945.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Treats origins, conduct and outcome of World War II in global setting. Emphasis on roles of national interest, policy making, relations of states, and effects of war on societies involved. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3523. History after the Internet: Exploring Digital History.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with HSTM 3523) Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Examines major themes, issues, and developments affecting the research, writing, analysis, preservation and presentation of history in the digital age. Includes hands-on engagement with and critical assessment of the use of digital tools for conducting historical inquiry, and exploration of the circulation of historical knowledge in such venues as social media, blogs, podcasts, digital archives, online collections and historically-themed gaming. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3533. The History of Early American Women.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1483 or 1493, or junior standing. Explores the history of American women from the seventeenth century to the mid-nineteenth century by focusing on women's lives from a wide variety of perspectives including demographic change, sexuality, work patterns, and political involvement. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3543. The History of Modern American Women.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1483 or 1493, or junior standing. Explores the history of American women from the mid-nineteenth century to the present by focusing on women's lives from a wide variety of perspectives including demographic change, family life, sexuality, work patterns, and political involvement. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3553. Slavery and the Civil War Era.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493, or junior standing, or permission of instructor. A course of lectures on the social, economic, political, intellectual and military aspects of the Civil War era. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3563. Jerusalem.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines how Jerusalem has been shaped by subjects as different as King David, Jesus, and Muhammed to soccer hooligans, suicide bombers, artists, and refugees. Also examines the Middle East conflict; the relationships between Jews, Christians, and Muslims; and historical and contemporary Israel. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3573. Special Topics Colloquium.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: History major and junior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of topic, maximum credit 15 hours. A writing-intensive, open topic, seminar designed to improve students' research and writing abilities and introduce them to basic methodological issues in history. While the course is specifically meant to prepare students for their senior capstone course, the emphasis on research and writing will enhance their preparation for all upper-division history course. This course must be completed prior to enrolling for the senior capstone. (F, Sp)

HIST 3583. History of Sport in America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the role of sport in American society, and uses sport as a device to explore social, historical and political topics like the commercialization of leisure, changing conceptions of masculinity, violence, racism, labor relations, gender relations, and working-class culture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3593. Women in the American West.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1483 or 1493. Nineteenth-century gender ideologies, multi-cultural interaction and exchange, work roles and community building, participation in politics, and reform movements of women in Trans-Mississippi West. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3603. The Spiritual Conquest of Latin America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. This course deals with orthodoxy and its discontents in the golden age of Catholic empire. The Church was central to the spread of the Spanish and Portuguese empires across the globe, and in the policing of their subject peoples. This course will explore church and popular religion in this time, as well as some of its rich documents. (Irreg.)

HIST 3613. Roman Religion.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with RELS 3613) Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. The course examines religious practices and beliefs in the Roman world from the founding of the Roman Republic to Late Antiquity, including conceptions of the divine, ways of worshiping the gods, civic and private religion, conceptions of the afterlife, magic, the mystery religions and salvation, and philosophical religions, through a survey of literary and archaeological evidence. (Irreg.)

HIST 3623. Conformity and Dissent in the 1950s and 1960s.3 Credit Hours.

Examines conformity and dissent in the 1950s and 1960s. Topics include the consumer culture, suburbia, the impact of television, 'McCarthyism', the Beats and the 1960s counterculture, student protest, civil rights and black nationalism, and women's liberation. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3633. American Indian History to 1880.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213, or junior standing, or permission of instructor. Examines the ways in which native societies in North America responded to European invasions between 1492 and 1890. Emphasis will be placed on Indian culture, the way in which it changed, and the various governmental attempts to destroy it. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC] .

HIST 3643. American Indian History Since 1865.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213; or junior standing, or permission of instructor. Examines American Indian history since the 19th century reservation era. Major themes include life patterns, cultural survival patterns, pan-Indian movements, the Indian Reorganization Act, relocation and termination policies, and self-determination issues. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3653. American Jewish History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. The course examines American Jewish experiences from 1654 to the present, and the ways in which Jews adapted to American life, constructed American-Jewish identities, and contributed to American politics and culture. Topics include: immigration, assimilation, gender norms, antisemitism, McCarthyism, suburbanization, the Holocaust, Israel, the civil rights movement, and political behavior, among others. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3663. The American Presidency & the Presidents, Washington-Trump.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Provides an examination of the most important presidents in US history. Topics include the limits of presidential power, the separation of powers, leadership in war and peace, and the changing role of political parties, the press, and campaign contributions in shaping the office and those who fill it. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3673. Arguing over America, 1917-2001.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines how Americans argued over the nature of contemporary American society and culture, especially as applied to minority groups, from World War I until 9/11. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3683. Capitalism and Socialism.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL/EXPO 1213 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course will focus on the development of socialism and capitalism in Europe and the United States. We study ideas and practice--the vision and the reality-of the two systems, examining their implications for economic and political organization, class and family relationships, and culture broadly defined. (Irreg.)

HIST 3690. Topics in Latin American History.1-5 Credit Hours.

1 to 5 hours. May be repeated for credit with change of content. Discussion of a selected special problem or problems in the history of Latin America. (F)

HIST 3693. Spanish Borderlands.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Examines the region made up roughly of what are now the states of California (Baja and Alta), Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Chihuahua, Coahuila, and Sonora; the colonial period. The peoples of the Southwest have responded to the challenges of coexistence both through violence and creative mutual adaptation. Students will gain knowledge of the varieties of colonial experience in the region. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3703. Native Peoples of Latin America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Explores the history of Latin America's indigenous peasantry and the issue of ethnicity in the modern world. Focus is on the people of Mexico, Guatemala, Peru and Brazil. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3713. History of Mexico, 1800-Present.3 Credit Hours.

Explores the history of Mexico from independence to the present. Particular attention is paid to the issues of statebuilding, dependency, revolution, and post-revolutionary change. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3723. Africa Since 1945.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Thematically and chronologically examines social, political, cultural and economic developments in Africa from the end of World War II to the contemporary period. The growth of millenarian religious movements, nationalism, decolonization, and the post-colonial nation states are among the topics examined. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3733. History of Heaven and Hell in Judaism and Christianity.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Traces the evolution of the concept of the afterlife, eternal reward and punishment in Judaism and Christianity from late Antiquity to the high Middle Ages. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3743. African-American History to 1877.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Traces the history of African-Americans from their African origins to the end of the Reconstruction of the southern United States in 1877. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3753. African-American History Since 1877.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Considers African-American history in its national and international contexts from the post-emancipation South until the twentieth century. Topics include the African-American political traditions and activism. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3763. Genesis Through Jewish Eyes.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Through a close reading of Genesis and its Jewish interpreters, this class takes one mode of reading to ask: How a minority tradition understands key passages, terms & theologies. It also addresses how deducing the Bible's message depends on one's own presuppositions, and how another tradition can enhance one's own reading of Scripture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3773. Jews and Christians--Middle Ages.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1113 or HIST 1223 or HIST 1613 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Traces the development of the relationship between the Jewish minority and the Christian majority in medieval Europe, from the fifth century to the early modern period. Discusses how Jews and Christians dealt with and imagined each other. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3793. Imperial Russia.3 Credit Hours.

A study of the origins and growth of the Russian Empire, origins and development of autocracy and serfdom, Russia's emergence as a great power, its reforms and revolutions. (Sp, Su) [IV-WC].

HIST 3803. The Era of the Russian Revolutions.3 Credit Hours.

Deals specifically with the conditions and events of change in Russia between 1905 and 1921. Seeks to take into account the broad questions of industrialization and backwardness, the popular responses to these matters and the rise of radical groups. Beyond this setting, major attention will be placed on the dissolution of the old regime during World War I and the two revolutions of March and November 1917, as well as the civil wars and the NEP. (Sp)

HIST 3813. Twentieth-Century Russian History.3 Credit Hours.

Detailed study of political, social, cultural and economic developments in the Soviet Union in world affairs. (F) [IV-WC].

HIST 3823. Law and Punishment.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines how four ancient polities--classical Athens, imperial Rome, early China,and the Hebrew tribes, as represented in the Hebrew Bible--meted out, and justified, punishment. Where possible, we willprobe contemporary debates about punishment, but we will also closely scrutinize portions of the still extant codes and commandments from these polities relating to various criminal activities of interest. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3833. Archaeology of the Lands of the Bible.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with RELS 3833) Prerequisite: junior standing. Examines the lands, cultures, and people associated with the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament through a chronological survey of archaeological evidence and investigates the relationship between archaeology and biblical texts. The course also investigates archaeological evidence for Jewish and Christian practices in late Roman Palestine as well as archaeological and architectural evidence for early Islamic Jerusalem. (Sp) [IV-WC].

HIST 3843. Latin American Independence 1750-1880.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 3843) Prerequisite: HIST 2613 or HIST 2623 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Covers history of Latin America from the crisis and dissolution of the Iberian empires through the consolidation of independent republics, a period bridging the colonial and modern periods in the region's history. (Irreg.)

HIST 3853. Japan to 1850.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Traces the history of Japan beginning with the earliest Jomon and Yayoi cultures and ending with the unraveling of the last feudal regime in the nineteenth century. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3863. Japan Since 1850.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Designed to introduce students to the history of Japan from the 1850's to the present. Will include the Meiji restoration, industrial development, imperial expansion, wartime mobilization, the U.S. occupation, economic recovery and high growth, and the changing political and popular culture of the 1980s and 1990s. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3873. Early Imperial China.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. The cultural, political, economic, and social transformations China underwent during the period from the Sui to the Song dynasties. (Alt. F) (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3883. Late Imperial China.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. The cultural, political, economic, and social transformations China underwent during the rule of its later dynasties from the 13th-century Mongol conquest to the final struggles and collapse of China's existence as an empire with the Revolution of 1911. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3893. Greek Religion.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with RELS 3893) Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the religious rituals, beliefs, and sacred sites of the ancient Greeks. Considers such topics as the relationship between myths and ritual, sacred time and space, concepts of the afterlife, and the role of religion in the family and city-state. (Irreg.)

HIST 3923. China Since 1911.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. An examination of Chinese history since the Revolution of 1911, including the development of Republican and Communist thought, warlord rule, China's tumultuous wartime period, and the rise of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Also covers the history of the PRC, China after Mao, Taiwan and China's changing position in the world. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3933. U.S. Queer History.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with WGS 3933) Prerequisite: Junior standing. The last 130 years have been a time of incredible change for LBGTQ people and the meanings of sexuality in the United States. We will trace LGBTQ experience and community formation, the policing of queer communities, and the constructions of queerness in pop culture, medicine, the law, and politics, as well as how these histories inform our own time. (Irreg.)

HIST 3950. Topics in Middle Eastern History.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Discussion of a selected problem or problems in Middle Eastern history. (Irreg.)

HIST 3953. The Modern Middle East.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Explores the political and social history of the modern countries of Egypt, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria and Turkey and areas affected by them from 1500 to the present. (F) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program and permission. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will consist of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 3963. From Zionism to Modern Israel.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing. Examines the historical evolution of the Zionist movement in the second half of the 19th century through the establishment of the State of Israel in the mid-20th century within the framework of Jewish modernization, antisemitism, and conflicting modern nationalisms. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. The projects covered will vary. The content will deal with concepts not usually presented in regular coursework. (Sp, Su)

HIST 3973. Judaism - A Religious History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Introductory survey of Judaism from its earliest origins in the ancient Near East to the present. Development of ideas, forms of worship, and religious expression as well as sectarian trends and variations will be examined. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Provides an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and junior standing. May be repeated once with change of content. Independent study may be arranged to study a subject not available through regular course offerings. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 3993. The Evolution of Martyrdom in the Judeo-Christian Civilization.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing. Traces the historical development of martyrdom in Judaism and Christianity to understand what motivated individuals and communities to give up their lives for their convictions. Compare the evolution of the idea of martyrdom in Judaism and Christianity to identify differences and similarities between these two faiths. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4003. Jews and Other Germans.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Discusses the history and culture of the Jews in Germany from 1750 until the Nazi period. Focuses on the internal dimension of the German-Jewish experience and analyze the contribution of Jews to the German culture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4023. Inquisitions.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1223 or 1233 or junior standing or permission of the instructor. Examines the historical roots of inquisitions in order to better understand how they have shaped modern conflicts. The mechanisms people used for disciplining themselves, for imposing control on others, and for evaluating who has the right to participate in society reveals people's fears, priorities, and weaknesses. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4083. Museums, Monuments, Memory.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1223 or HIST 1233 or HIST 1613 or HIST 1623 or HIST 1923 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Globally oriented course that explores how national and ethnic memory play a key role in the formation of social and cultural identities. Emphasis is placed on rituals, "sites of memory," monuments, museums and their publics. (Irreg.)

HIST 4113. The Historical Novel.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1233 or HIST 1493 or HIST 1623 or HIST 1923 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course will consider the history of the historical novel treating nationalism and identity from 1814 to the present. We will consider the historical novels' use of history and of psychology with the methods of intellectual history. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4203. Classical China.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Examines the roots of Chinese civilization, from its pre-historical origins through its emergence as a formidable empire to its devolution during a lengthy period of civil war after the end of the Han dynasty. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 4213. China's Art of War.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Scope of course is both the theory and practice of warfare in China's pre-modern eras; discussion of some of the most renowned texts on military strategy, and the theoretical issues that are involved in strategizing about and preparing for war. Study of the cause and effect of various wars from the earliest periods to just before the modern period. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 4313. American Foreign Policy, 1900-45.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Explores the globalization of American foreign relations, from the origins of late 19th century expansion to the diplomacy culminating in the creation of the United Nations at the end of World War II. (Irreg.)

HIST 4343. The Vietnam War.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisites: 1483 or 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course explores the origins of the Vietnam War, how the United States waged the war, the impact of the war on American culture, and the meaning of the United States defeat in Vietnam. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4393. American Working Class.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course examines the working- and lower-class experience in America from the colonial period to the present. Topics include: social banditry and piracy, slavery, rise of the factory, scientific management, women and work, 19th and 20th century labor movement, radicalism, prostitution, and working-class masculinity. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4403. Mussolini, Fascism, & America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493, or junior standing, or permission of instructor. Explores the nature of fascism & Mussolini's rule from 1922 until his death in 1945, including the cult of Il Duce, fascist architecture and the fascist aesthetic in general, fascism and youth, fascism and conquest, and the American response to Italian fascism in the 1920s and 1930s. (Irreg.){IV-WC}

HIST 4453. American Military History 1860-Present.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 1483 or HIST 1493 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Explores United States military history from the Civil War through the modern age. With a special emphasis on politics, culture, and rapidly changing technology, this class focuses on the evolution of the American way of war as well as the transformative nature of war on the nation. (Irreg.)

HIST 4493. Africa and the Atlantic Slave Trade.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. About the changing nature of slavery in and the impact of slave trading on Africans in their homelands and in the diaspora. Origins in Africa; rise of the Atlantic trade; impact of the trade; middle passage, etc. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 4503. Brazil, 1500-2000.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2613 or 2623 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Surveys the history of Brazil from contact to 2000. Touches on the pre-Columbian period, but focuses on the social, cultural, economic and political transformation of the region under Portuguese and Brazilian rule. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4513. Intellectuals & Artists in Modern Latin America.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 4513) Prerequisite: 2613 or 2623 or junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines both the history of ideas in modern Latin America as well as the history of intellectuals as a social group. We will consider intellectuals in the process of independence and the consolidation of nation states, the role of "race" in Latin American thought, and the relationship between European and Latin American thought. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4523. Latin American Left.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 4523) Prerequisite: 2613 or 2623 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course examines the shifting political tactics and theoretical positions of a variety of leftist movements in Latin America since the early 20th century. We will examine leftist thought on the nature of Latin American development, approaches to commercial culture, and labor organizing, among other topics. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4533. Populism in 20th-Century South America.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 4533) Prerequisite: 2613 or 2623 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course examines the phenomenon of Latin American "populism," a set of political movements that held a central place in 20th-century Latin American history. We will focus on three cases as they relate to the broader economic and social processes in the region as a whole: Brazil; Argentina; and Chile. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4543. Latin America in the Age of the Cuban Revolution.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 4543) Prerequisite: 2613 or 2623 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course is an in-depth examination of Latin American history of the period 1955-1973. We cover changes in politics, economics, literature, film, music, and theology in what many Latin Americans called the "revolutionary process" of the period. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

HIST 4553. Environmental History of Latin America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Serves as a broad-based study of the environmental history of Latin America. We will examine the history of human interactions with the natural world in this region from pre-Colombian and colonial eras through contemporary times. Heavy emphasis will be placed on comparing native life-ways with the changes wrought by European colonization and the results on the land (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 4563. History of India.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: HIST 2723 or junior standing or permission of instructor. This course will survey the social, cultural, political and colonial histories of India beginning with the emergence of one of the earliest human civilizations in the Indus valley. Topics include: politics and culture before, during and after colonization; religion; and economic and social history. (Irreg.) [IV-WDC].

HIST 4950. History Internship.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: History major and junior standing, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Allows history majors to receive credit for qualifying internships appropriate to the subject. Students who complete the course engage in service learning that focuses on historical content. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

HIST 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

HIST 4973. Undergraduate Seminar in History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: History majors may enroll only after completing 75 credit hours of undergraduate coursework, 24 hours of which must be history. Non-majors may enroll with permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Extensive research in historical sources and literature relating to a special problem or topic selected by the instructor. Emphasis will be on the individual preparation of research papers. (F, Sp, Su) [V].

HIST 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 5001. Navigating The History Profession.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Introduction to the various fields of historical inquiry, resources for historical research, and how to navigate the history profession -- conferences, grants, the job market --and the OU graduate programs, M.A. and Ph.D. (F)

HIST 5050. Directed Readings in History.1-4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Graduate-level independent study for master's candidates only. (Irreg.)

HIST 5110. Independent Studies in European History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study, arranged between the professor and student, in the history of Europe. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 5210. Independent Studies in American History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content, maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study, arranged between the professor and student, in the history of America. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 5310. Independent Studies in Latin American History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content, maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study, arranged between the professor and student, in the history of Latin America. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 5410. Independent Studies in African History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study, arranged between the professor and student, in the history of Africa. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 5510. Independent Studies in Asian History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study, arranged between the professor and student, in the history of Asia. (F, Sp)

HIST 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 5970. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or research and field projects. (Irreg.)

HIST 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

Variable enrollment, two to nine hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, four hours. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

HIST 6050. Research Problems.2-5 Credit Hours.

2 to 5 hours. Prerequisite: 12 hours of history and permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. An individual course of intensive research with the area and problem to be determined by the student and directing instructor. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 6160. Advanced Readings in European History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; student must be at Ph.D. level. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study in the history of Europe; designed to give students the opportunity to do intensive readings in his/her major fields of study under direct guidance of his/her advisory committee. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 6200. Seminar in European History.2-4 Credit Hours.

2 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing with permission; May be repeated with change of content, maximum credit 18 hours. Training in historical research, bibliography and historiography, featuring reports and criticism. (F, Sp)

HIST 6230. Advanced Directed Readings in Medieval History.1-5 Credit Hours.

1 to 5 hours. Prerequisite: master's degree or equivalent in history, reading knowledge of French and German and permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content and permission; maximum credit 18 hours. A supervised program of readings on a selected special problem in medieval history. (F)

HIST 6260. Advanced Readings in American History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; student must be at Ph.D. level. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study in American history; designed to give students the opportunity to do intensive readings in his/her major fields of study under direct guidance of his/her advisory committee. (F, Sp)

HIST 6300. Seminar in Latin American History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission; May be repeated with change of content, maximum credit 18 hours. Training in historical research, bibliography and historiography. Features reports and criticism. (Irreg.)

HIST 6360. Advanced Readings in Latin American History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; student must be at Ph.D. level. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study in Latin American history; designed to give students the opportunity to do intensive readings in his/her major fields of study under direct guidance of his/her advisory committee. (F, Sp)

HIST 6400. Seminar in American History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing with permission; May be repeated with change of content, maximum credit 24 hours. Training in historical research, bibliography and historiography. Features reports and criticism. (F, Sp)

HIST 6460. Advanced Readings in African History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; student must be at Ph.D. level. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study in African history; designed to give students the opportunity to do intensive readings in his/her major fields of study under direct guidance of his/her advisory committee. (F, Sp)

HIST 6500. Seminar in Transnational Women's and Gender History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; May be repeated with change of content; maximum credits 6 hours. The course introduces students to the theoretical foundations and research methods in transnational women's and gender history. Students will develop competency in feminist theories and build expertise in the historiographies of women and gender in their subfields. (Irreg.)

HIST 6560. Advanced Readings in Asian History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor; student must be at Ph.D. level. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 15 hours. Independent study in Asian history; designed to give students the opportunity to do intensive readings in his/her major fields of study under direct guidance of his/her advisory committee. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 6600. Seminar in Middle Eastern History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing with permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Training in historical research, bibliography and historiography. Features reports and criticism. (Irreg.)

HIST 6700. Seminar in Transnational History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. The course aims to engage the histories and legacies of nationalism, colonialism, and other transnational historical phenomena. Particular emphasis will be given to discussing national, transnational, and colonial systems and how those systems shaped identities, race, ethnicities, national and transnational dynamics, and created transnational subjectivities. (Irreg.)

HIST 6800. Seminar in Modern Japanese History.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing with permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Training in historical research, bibliography, and historiography. Features reports and criticism. (Irreg.)

HIST 6960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Directed readings and/or literature review under the direction of a faculty member. (Irreg.)

HIST 6970. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or research and field projects. (Irreg.)

HIST 6980. Research for Doctoral Dissertation.2-16 Credit Hours.

2 to 16 hours. (F, Sp, Su)

HIST 6990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

Faculty

Last Name First/Middle Name Middle init. OU Service start Title(s), date(s) appointed Degrees Earned, Schools, Dates Completed
Anderson Gary C 1991 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 1991; GEORGE LYNN CROSS RESEARCH PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2010 PhD, Toledo Univ, 1978; MA, South Dakota Univ, 1972; BA/BS, Concordia College, 1971
Bradford Alfred S 1994 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 1994; JOHN SAXON CHAIR OF ANCIENT HISTORY, 2002 PhD, Univ of Chicago, 1973; MA, Univ of Chicago, 1966; BA, Univ of Wisconsin, 1964
Brosnan Kathleen A 2012 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2012; PAUL H. & DORIS TRAVIS CHAIR IN MODERN AMERICAN HISTORY, 2012 PhD, Univ of Chicago, 1999; JD, Univ of Illinois, 1985; BA, Knox College, 1982
Browning Elizabeth Grennan 2022 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2022 PhD, Univ of California, Davis, 2017; MA, Univ of California, Davis, 2015; BA, Northwestern Univ, 2007
Cane Carrasco James A 2002 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2008; AFFILIATE ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES, 2008 PhD, Univ of California-Berkeley, 2000; MA, Univ of California-Berkeley, 1994; BSc, Univ of Wisconsin, 1990
Casey Jay 2019 LECTURER IN HISTORY, 2019 PhD, Univ. of Houston, 2005; MA, Univ. of Houston, 2000; MA, Louisiana State Univ, 1995
Chappell David L 2007 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2007; IRENE AND JULIAN J. ROTHBAUM PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2007 PhD, Univ of Rochester, 1992; BA, Yale Univ, 1982
Davis Cline Jennifer J 2007 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2013; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES, 2013 PhD, Penn State Univ, 2004; BA, Carleton College, 1996
Duval Lauren 2019 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2019 PhD, American Univ, 2018; MA, American Univ, 2016; BA, Colby College, 2009
Eliot Lewis 2021 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2021 PhD, Univ of South Carolina, 2021; MA, Queen's Univ, Belfast, 2013; BA, School of Oriental & African Studies, Univ of London, 2012
Faison Elyssa 2000 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2007; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES, 2008; L.R. BRAMMER JR. PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2016 PhD, Univ of California-Los Angeles, 2001; MA, Univ of California-Los Angeles, 1994; BA, Oberlin College, 1988
Folsom Raphael B 2007 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2017 PhD, Yale Univ, 2007; MA, New York Univ, 2000; BA, Harvard Univ, 1997
Gillon Steven M 1997 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 1997; PROFESSOR OF HONORS, 1997 PhD, Brown Univ, 1985; AM, Brown Univ, 1980; AB, Widener Univ, 1978
Grinberg Ronnie A 2015 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2015; ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN JUDAIC AND ISRAEL STUDIES PhD, Northwestern Univ, 2010; MA, Northwestern Univ, 2004; BA, Barnard College-Columbia Univ, 2001
Gross Miriam D 2010 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2016; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES, 2016 PhD, Univ of California San Diego, 2010; MA, Columbia Univ, 2002; BA, Reed College, 1991
Hines Sarah 2018 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2018 PhD, Univ of California Berkeley, 2015; MA, City College of New York, 2005; BA, Barnard College, Columbia Univ, 2002
Holguin Sandie E 1995 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2019; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES, 2002 PhD, Univ of California Los Angeles, 1994; MA, Univ of California Los Angeles, 1989; BA, Univ of California Los Angeles, 1985
Holland Jennifer L 2014 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2021; L.R. BRAMMER JR PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2022 PhD, Univ of Wisconsin, 2013; MA, Utah State Univ, 2005; BA, Univ of Michigan, 2003
Hyde Anne F 2015 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2015 PhD, Univ of California Berkeley, 1988; MA, Univ of California Berkeley, 1983; BA, Mount Holyoke College, 1982
Keppel Ben 1994 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2016 PhD, Univ of California Los Angeles, 1992; MA, Univ of California Los Angeles, 1986; BA, Univ of California Davis, 1984
Levenson Alan T 2008 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2008; SCHUSTERMAN-JOSEY CHAIR IN JUDAIC HISTORY, 2015; DIRECTOR, SCHUSTERMAN CENTER OF JUDAIC AND ISRAEL STUDIES, 2015 PhD, Ohio State Univ, 1990; MS, Brown Univ, 1982; BA, Brown Univ, 1982
Magnusson Roberta J 1995 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2001; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2012 PhD, Univ of California Berkeley, 1994; MA, Univ of California Berkeley, 1986; BA, Univ of California Berkeley, 1977
Malka Adam 2018 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2020 PhD, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, 2012; MA, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, 2005; BA, Univ of Pennsylvania, 2002
Metcalf R. Warren 1997 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2003; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES, 2003 PhD, Univ of Arizona, 1995; MA, Brigham Young Univ, 1989; BA, Brigham Young Univ, 1982
Norwood Stephen H 1987 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2002 PhD, Columbia Univ, 1983; MA, Columbia Univ, 1975; BA, Tufts Univ, 1972
Olberding Garret P 2004 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2022; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2013 PhD, Univ of Chicago, 2007; MA, Univ of Hawaii, 1997; BA, Yale Univ, 1992
Saho Bala 2012 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2018; ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERNATIONAL AND AREA STUDIES, 2016 PhD, Michigan State Univ, 2012; MA, Univ of Illinois, 2007; BA, Univ of Jyväskyla, 1990
Schapkow Carsten 2005 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2012; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN JUDAIC AND ISRAEL STUDIES; L.R. BRAMMER JR PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2018 PhD, Freie Universität Berlin, 2000; MA, Freie Universität Berlin, 1995
Schumaker Kathryn A 2013 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2021; EDITH KINNEY GAYLORD PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2018 PhD, Univ of Chicago, 2013; MA, Univ of Chicago, 2008; BA, Northwestern Univ, 2005
Seidelman Rhona 2015 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2021; SCHUSTERMAN CHAIR IN MODERN ISRAEL STUDIES PhD, Ben-Gurion Univ of Negev, 2009; MA, Hebrew Univ of Jerusalem, 2001; BA, Hebrew Univ of Jerusalem, 1998
Shepkaru Shmuel 1997 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2005; SCHUSTERMAN PROFESSOR OF JEWISH RELIGIOUS AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY, 2015; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR IN JUDAIC AND ISRAEL STUDIES PhD, New York Univ, 1997; MA, New York Univ, 1993; BA, Haifa Univ, 1985
Simon Cori L 2020 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2020 PhD, Univ of Wisconsin-Madison, 2019; MA, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2014; BA, Macalester College, 2012
Stockdale Melissa 1989 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2016; BRIAN E. AND SANDRA O'BRIEN PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2006 PhD, Harvard Univ; 1989; MA, Harvard Univ, 1981; BA, Univ of Tulsa, 1979
Ward Janet A 2011 PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2011; L.R. BRAMMER JR PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2019 PhD, Univ of Virginia, 1993; MA, Univ of Pennsylvania, 1989; BA, Royal Holloway Univ of London, 1985
Wickersham Jane K 2006 ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2010; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2012 PhD, Indiana Univ, 1996; MA, Indiana Univ, 1996; BA, Univ of Georgia, 1994
Wrobel David M 201 MERRICK CHAIR IN WESTERN AMERICAN HISTORY, 2011; PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2011; DAVID L. BOREN PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, 2016 PhD, Ohio Univ, 1991; MA, Ohio Univ, 1987; BA, Univ of Kent, 1985