Division of Interior Design

Elizabeth Pober, Director
Suchismita Bhattacharjee, Ph.D., Graduate Liaison
Gould Hall
830 Van Vleet Oval, Room 180
Norman, OK 73019-6141
Phone: (405) 325-2444
FAX: (405) 325-7558
idcoa@ou.edu
architecture.ou.edu/interior-design/

General Information

The Division of Interior Design provides professional undergraduate and graduate education in Interior Design within a collaborative, multidisciplinary learning environment. The undergraduate program is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation. There are two graduate programs including a Master of Science in Interior Design, Post Professional and a Master of Science in Interior Design, First Professional. The disciplinary perspectives share a common pedagogy within the Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture divisions, engaging in creative and technical skills that prepare new graduates to solve problems related to global challenges facing the profession of Interior Design.

The Division of Interior Design recognizes the definition of a professional designer as the cornerstone of its philosophical underpinnings.

Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment. These solutions are functional, enhance the quality of life and culture of the occupants, and are aesthetically attractive. Designs are created in response to and coordinated with the building shell, and acknowledge the physical location and social context of the project. Designs must adhere to code and regulatory requirements, and encourage the principles of environmental sustainability. The interior design process follows a systematic and coordinated methodology, including research, analysis and integration of knowledge into the creative process, whereby the needs and resources of the client are satisfied to produce an interior space that fulfills the project goals.

Interior design includes a scope of services performed by a professional design practitioner, qualified by means of education, experience, and examination, to protect and enhance the life, health, safety and welfare of the public. These services may include any or all of the following tasks:

  • Research and analysis of the client's goals and requirements; and development of documents, drawings and diagrams that outline those needs
  • Formulation of preliminary space plans and two and three dimensional design concept studies and sketches that integrate the client's program needs and are based on knowledge of the principles of interior design and theories of human behavior
  • Confirmation that preliminary space plans and design concepts are safe, functional, aesthetically appropriate, and meet all public health, safety and welfare requirements, including code, accessibility, environmental, and sustainability guidelines
  • Selection of colors, materials and finishes to appropriately convey the design concept, and to meet socio­psychological , functional, maintenance, life-cycle performance, environmental, and safety requirements;
  • Selection and specification of furniture, fixtures, equipment and millwork, including layout drawings and detailed product description; and provision of contract documentation to facilitate pricing, procurement and installation of furniture
  • Provision of project management services, including preparation of project budgets and schedules;
  • Preparation of construction documents, consisting of plans, elevations, details and specifications, to illustrate non-structural and/or non-seismic partition layouts; power and communications locations; reflected ceiling plans and lighting designs; materials and finishes; and furniture layouts
  • Preparation of construction documents to adhere to regional building and fire codes, municipal codes, and any other jurisdictional statutes, regulations and guidelines applicable to the interior space
  • Coordination and collaboration with other allied design professionals who may be retained to provide consulting services, including but not limited to architects; structural, mechanical and electrical engineers, and various specialty consultants
  • Confirmation that construction documents for non-structural and/or non-seismic construction are signed and sealed by the responsible Interior Designer, as applicable to jurisdictional requirements for filing with code enforcement officials
  • Administration of contract documents, bids and negotiations as the client's agent
  • Observation and reporting on the implementation of projects while in progress and upon completion, as a representative of and on behalf of the client; and conducting post-occupancy evaluation reports

Learn more from the National Council for Interior Design Qualification at: www.ncidq.org

The basic principles and concepts of interior design guide our thinking and decision-making with regard to program content, delivery and evaluation. We direct our efforts toward the development of the entry level Interior Design professional, with capabilities in the enhancement of the function and quality of interior spaces. We promote an understanding of current practice within the broadest context of the interior architectural profession as well as within the southwestern culture specific to this region.

The program places value upon three distinct characteristics which embody the philosophy of the Interior Design program at OU:

  • Learning is centered around contemporary practice: faculty bring significant practice experience which demonstrates advanced achievement in design management expertise beyond the project management levels of interior architectural design practice.
  • Learning is diverse and demonstrates a holistic approach to design problem-solving: faculty and students are exposed to regional and international practices emphasizing resources, culture and tradition-based design. The program also addresses global considerations focusing on issues which reinforce the positioning of interior design for the future.
  • Learning is interdisciplinary: the location of the Interior Design program within a college that shares teaching pedagogy across the disciplines of the built environment provides Interior Design faculty and students with an environment where team contributions are sought and disciplinary expertise is valued.

The mission of the Division of Interior Design is to provide a design education within a student-centric learning environment emphasizing excellence in education, research and service to the community.  

The goals of the Interior Design program in the Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture reflect the program’s location and resources and embrace change as a constant variable in the learning environment. The program strives to:

  • prepare entry level Interior Designers to work effectively with professionals from other disciplines engaged in the planning, design and management of the built environment;
  • engage Interior Design students in the exploration of design within broad cultural contexts, addressing both regional and international contributions to the design of the built environment while utilizing resources across and beyond the campus;
  • integrate the expressive qualities embodied in the practice of interior design within the context of a technological learning environment;
  • capitalize upon the design practice and design management expertise of the faculty by engaging students in effective and appropriate problem-solving experiences involving student-centered research of the built environment;
  • challenge students by addressing contemporary and critical issues facing the profession;
  • ensure adequate curricular flexibility to accommodate future change affecting interior design education throughout the duration of a four year program of study;
  • preserve and enhance the development of problem-solving skills within a sequential studio sequence, continually expanding to encompass increasingly more complex concepts, skills, knowledge and application strategies; and,
  • actively seek and promote the involvement of external organizations in collaborative partnerships, providing opportunities for students and faculty to engage in real life design experiences.

Special Programs and Facilities

An active Interior Design Student Association (IDSA) student chapter umbrella provides students with valuable interaction with members of the Interior Design profession while pursuing their degree.  The International Interior Design Association (IIDA) and the American Society of Interior Designers (ASID) are two of the industry professional organizations aligned with IDSA.  The IDSA student chapter sponsors field trips to designers’ offices, significant design projects and sites in the region, furnishings markets, and trade shows. Students also participate in competitions in studio as well as through formal independent study opportunities. In addition, students travel to national professional meetings, undertake structured internship experiences, and work with real clients.

College and divisional seminars bring visiting scholars and noted professionals to the college to provide students with a broad understanding of the multi-disciplinary nature of the college and both international and national exposure to significant work in the built environment.

Design studios provide students with permanent work stations. A resource room and lighting lab with current manufacturers’ catalogs, architecture and interior design samples, and technical data that provides students with design resource materials. The Christopher C. Gibbs College of Architecture maintains a shared computer lab with access 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Undergraduate Study

Bachelor of Interior Design

The Bachelor of Interior Design program requires completion of a minimum of 120 semester hours distributed in general education, major, and elective courses.

Minors

Curriculum Organization

The Interior Design curriculum combines the development of conceptual ideas — knowledge of art, architecture, craft, and manufacture that stimulates form-making and design with technical knowledge essential to the delivery of the interior built environment — while at the same time integrating the important tasks and rituals of individuals and groups.

A sequential core of professional courses and design studios are linked to University general education courses to prepare students for ever-changing conditions of practice and life. Sequential studio coursework is required in each semester from the environmental design foundation coursework through to the Interior Design capstone. The curriculum enables interdisciplinary experiences with Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Construction Science disciplines.

Graduate Study

The Master of Science in Interior Design First Professional option offers graduate education in Interior Design to students who do not have a previous professional degree in Interior Design or Architecture. The program reinforces the notion of collaboration and integrated practices in the built environment.

The Master of Science in Interior Design Post Professional option offers an opportunity for students with an undergraduate degree accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA).

Courses

I D 1134. Interior Design Communication Studio I.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Majors only; Corequisite: I D 1164. Introduction to the fundamentals of sketching, technical drawing and rendering techniques and their relationship to each other. Communication of design ideas through the application of drafting techniques, equipment, and architectural graphics. (F)

I D 1164. Interior Design Studio I.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Majors only; corequisite: I D 1134. Overview of the 2d and 3d design principles and elements, color theory, light and their application to interior design and the design process. Exploration of shape and the relationship to space, organization, and order; emphasis on volumetric thinking and the spatial envelope. (F)

I D 1173. Foundations of Interior Design.3 Credit Hours.

Contemporary exploration of the interior design profession as both a creative and problem-solving process. Emphasis on the elements and principles that define interior spaces, the design process and technical aspects of the interior design profession. Types of practices, professional registration, certifications, professional organizations and the integration of interior design with allied disciplines will be provide through project exploration. (F)

I D 1234. Interior Design Communication Studio II.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 1134 and ID 1164; Corequisite: ID 1264; majors only. Introduction of computer applications in the professional practice of interior design. Software use for graphic communication of design and problem-solving solutions in two and three-dimensional representations. (Sp)

I D 1264. Interior Design Studio II.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 1134 and ID 1164; corequisite: ID 1234. An introduction to space planning strategies, interior architectural components, accessibility guidelines, design programming, residential codes, and the design process as they relate to small scale residential projects. (Sp)

I D 2334. Interior Design Communication Studio III.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 1234 and ID 1264; co-requisite: ID 2364; majors only. Advanced computer applications used in the professional practice of interior design for construction drawings and presentation drawings. The use of software applications in project delivery methods and integrated design practice. (F)

I D 2364. Interior Design Studio III.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 1234 and ID 1264; co-requisite: ID 2334; majors only; sophomore standing. Introduction to advanced space planning, human factors, universal design, building codes as they relate to multi-family and small commercial projects which include but are not restricted to retail, businesses, restaurant, cafe, coffee shop, gallery, up to 3,000 square feet. (F)

I D 2464. Interior Design Studio IV.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 2334 and ID 2364 I; majors only; sophomore standing. Introduction to human needs and activities as design determinants, design implications of spatial relationships, scale and function, advanced building codes, and design programming as they relate to institutional building design which can include but is not limited to educational facilities, libraries, higher-ed, k-12 or museums up to 5000 square feet. (Sp)

I D 2773. Interior Construction.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 1234 and ID 1264; majors only. Introduction to the building and finish materials used in the design of non-loadbearing interior construction. Development of accurate selection and detailing of materials and assemblies in construction drawings. Additional topics include mechanical and electrical systems, building codes, and planning standards. (F)

I D 3433. Interior Design Portfolio I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 2364; majors only; sophomore standing. This course introduces various methods and formats of preparing a professional portfolio. An emphasis on the design of the portfolio, organization and delivery method including software applications necessary for the creation of portfolios. Students will exhibit personal design skills and achievements that will be assessed as part of the Interior Design Sophomore Portfolio Review. (Sp)

I D 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 3473. History of Interior Design.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ARCH 2243; majors only; sophomore standing. The course is an historical survey of interior design, decorative arts and product design from ancient to contemporary times. Particular emphasis is given to the history of interior design from late 19th century to the contemporary. (Sp)

I D 3564. Interior Design Studio V.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 2464; corequisite: ID 4573; acceptance into the Interior Design program; junior standing; Majors only. Introduction to the space planning processes and application of design principles as they pertain to mid-size commercial projects up to 8,000 square feet with an emphasis on health and wellness. Projects may include clinics, medical office buildings, fitness/ rehabilitation centers, and community engagement spaces. (F)

I D 3573. Interior Materials and Specifications.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 2364 and ID 2773; majors only; sophomore standing. Study of the basic characteristics and installation of materials and finishes used in the design of interiors, building codes, fire safety, and regulations for accessibility. Emphasis on writing specifications for furniture, fixtures and equipment and non-loadbearing construction. (Sp)

I D 3664. Interior Design Studio VI.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 3564 and ID 4573; majors only; junior standing. Design projects develop conceptual and critical thinking in design of corporate workplace environments, 10,000 square feet and larger. Lighting, interior systems, construction detailing and scheduling integrated into design projects. (Sp)

I D 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will consist of topics in keeping with student's major program. Topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Content deals with concepts not usually presented in regular coursework. (Irreg.)

I D 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for work on special projects under the guidance of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and junior standing. May be repeated once with change of content. Independent study may be arranged to study a subject not available through regular course offerings. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 4463. Interior Design Office Professional Practice.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with I D 5463) Prerequisite: ID 3573; majors only; junior standing. Review of business and professional issues relating to interior design practice including organizational structures, marketing, contracts, professional registration, trade professions, fee structures, and project management. Overview of legal, financial, management, and administrative issues, establishing a practice, managing a project progress, business development, business ethics, project compensation and agreements, issues and procedures for both commercial and residential design firms. No student may earn credit for both 4463 and 5463. (Sp)

I D 4573. Interior Lighting and Building Systems.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with I D 5573) Prerequisite: ID 2464; co-requisite ID 3564; Acceptance into the ID program; junior standing. Introduction to lighting design of interiors. Lecture presentations focus on design principles in lighting, lighting quality, lighting quantification codes, and energy conservation. Emphasis is on integration of lighting with interior spaces, techniques in lighting design, fixture design, and exploration of computer visualization. No student may earn credit for both 4573 and 5573. (F)

I D 4633. Interior Design Portfolio II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 3433; junior standing; majors only. Preparation and presentation of an advanced portfolio to be assessed by industry professionals and educators. An emphasis on the design of the portfolio, resume and marketing collateral and their organization and delivery methods including software applications necessary for creating printed and web-based portfolios. Will assist students in the transition to professional practice or graduate school. (Sp)

I D 4764. Furniture Design.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 3664; Corequisite: ID 4773; senior standing; majors only. The design and construction of furniture. Emphasis on ergonomics, design, and construction processes, construction drawings, materials and methods for custom and manufactured furniture and casework. Other topics include the application of design elements and principles in furniture design. Projects evolve from hand drawings to scaled models of furniture. (F)

I D 4773. Interior Design Capstone: Pre-Design Phase.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 3664 and ID 4573; co-requisite: ID 4764; senior standing; majors only. This course is the first of two Capstone courses and emphasizes the professional interior design practices and the utilization of comprehensive knowledge and skills of the major. The primary focus is research and program development for a design project of significant scale and complexity. Emphasis is also placed on identification of applicable building codes, regulations, site impacts and construction methods. (F) [V].

I D 4823. Design for Independent Living.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with I D 5823) Prerequisite: Senior standing. Students will be introduced to aging in place design and universal design that supports safe, comfortable and independent living for users as they age in their residential setting. The course will focus on design determinants, design implications of spatial relationships, scale and function, residential building codes, and design programming as they relate to aging in place homes. No student may earn credit for both 4823 and 5823. (Sp)

I D 4865. Interior Design Capstone: Design Phase.5 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ID 4773 and ID 4764; senior standing; majors only. This studio course is the second of two Capstone courses focused on a comprehensive professional interior design project and the utilization of comprehensive knowledge and skills of the major. Students will complete a design project of significant scale and complexity. The project will demonstrate competency in interior design showcasing students design abilities, technical knowledge and graphic presentation skills. (Sp) [V].

I D 4940. Field Work.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Field study related to the student's major in a position approved by the instructor. One hour credit per 120 hours of field work or equivalent. Documentation and evaluation is required. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

I D 4970. General Departmental Seminar.1-6 Credit Hours.

1 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change in content; maximum credit twelve hours. Special topics in interior design. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and director. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in scheduled courses. Study may include research and/or field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 5123. Environment and Human Behavior.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Architecture, and I D 5133 or RCPL 5113; or permission of instructor. The course introduces students to environmental psychology for design and illustrates situations that a designer will likely encounter while pursuing a design career. Students' analytical and deductive skills will be sharpened. Students will analyze situations and draw upon past knowledge and circumstances to deduce an outcome. (F)

I D 5133. Research Methods.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in College of Architecture or permission of instructor. Introduction to research methods with emphasis on the built environment. Topics will include interpretive-historical research, qualitative research, co-relational research, logical argumentation and case study/mixed methods. (Sp)

I D 5143. Design Theory Analysis and Evaluation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Architecture, and I D 5133 or RCPL 5113; or permission of instructor. The course examines the ways in which designers and theorists express and conceptualize interiors. Readings from significant works detailing the history of interior design and its role in the future are included. Through discussion, research papers, and independent analysis, students are expected to develop skills in analyzing and conceptualizing interior design principles. (F)

I D 5153. Practice and Leadership in a Global Design Market.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in College of Architecture or permission of instructor. Exploring ethical dimensions of work within and related to the settings of interior design. Students will look in detail at the dilemmas that occur within professional practice. These are comprised of theories that encourage and inform thinking about moral issues and frameworks that guide ethical decision making. (Sp)

I D 5163. Design Computation Visualization and Analysis.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in College of Architecture or permission of instructor. Focus is on the software used to introduce basic functions of (Building Information Modeling) BIM. Topics concentrate on techniques and methods for creating building parts, the production of construction documents, and renderings. Tools are also introduced for material and construction analysis as well as costing and scheduling data. (F)

I D 5223. Advanced Materials and Methods.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in College of Architecture or permission of instructor. The study and use of building materials specified during the design and construction process. Coursework will emphasize the analysis of current practices and applications involving material types and construction methods. (F)

I D 5343. Indoor Environmental Quality.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Architecture, and I D 5133 or RCPL 5113; or permission of instructor. Course focuses on the examination of the factors that contribute to indoor environmental quality and the design practices and techniques for improving indoor environmental quality. Specific topics include daylight, views, acoustic control, lighting, thermal comfort, and air quality. (F)

I D 5413. Indoor Controls and Technology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Architecture, I D 5343, and I D 5133 or RCPL 5113; or permission of instructor. The technology of luminaries and control systems, including solid systems, dimming control, and other building management systems, are introduced, analyzed, and applied to one design of space. Students will be taught how to design and coordinate lighting control for energy effectiveness, flexibility of space, and increased occupant satisfaction. (Sp)

I D 5463. Interior Design Office Professional Practice.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with ID 4463) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Architecture or permission of instructor. Review of business and professional issues relating to interior design practice, including organizational structures, marketing, contracts, professional registration, trade professions, fee structures, and project management. Overview of legal, financial, management, and administrative issues, establishing a practice, managing project progress, business development, business ethics, project compensation and agreements, and issues and procedures for both commercial and residential design firms. No student may earn credit for both 4463 and 5463. (Sp)

I D 5523. Graduate Studio I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of Graduate Liaison. Introduction to fundamental design and visual communication skills through material, formal, and spatial properties of design. Graphic techniques will be employed through a range of phases, from communicating initial design proposals to detailed drawings that can fully convey information necessary for construction. Students will construct architectural study models to use as spatial analysis during the design process. (F)

I D 5533. Graduate Studio II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and I D 5523, with I D 5763 a co-requisite, or permission of Graduate Liaison. An introduction to space planning strategies, interior architectural components, accessibility guidelines, design programming, residential codes, and the design process as they relate to small scale residential projects, with an emphasis on issues of form, function, space, light, materials, color, texture, and ergonomics. (Sp)

I D 5534. Graduate Studio III.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, I D 5533, and I D 5763, with I D 5163 as a co-requisite; or permission of Graduate Liaison. Introduction to advanced space planning, human factors, universal design, building codes as they relate to multi-family and small commercial projects, including but not restricted to retail, businesses, restaurants, cafes, coffee shops, and galleries up to 3,000 square feet; emphasis on the influence of space planning strategies and human factors on interior architectural components, design programming, and design development. (F)

I D 5544. Graduate Studio IV.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing, I D 5534, and I D 5163; or permission of Graduate Liaison. Introduction to human needs and activities as design determinants, design implications of spatial relationships, scale and function, building codes, and design programming as they relate to institutional building design, including but not limited to educational facilities, libraries, higher ed, K-12, or museums up to 5000 sq ft; emphasis on influence of human factor on furniture, fixture, and equipment specifications. (Sp)

I D 5564. Graduate Studio V.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and I D 5544, with I D 5573 as a co-requisite; or permission of Graduate Liaison. Introduction to the space planning processes and application of design principles as they pertain to mid-size commercial projects up to 8,000 square feet, with an emphasis on health and wellness. Projects may include clinics, medical office buildings, fitness/rehabilitation centers, and community engagement spaces; emphasis on the importance of evidence-based design research. (F)

I D 5573. Interior Lighting and Building Systems.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with I D 4573) Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the College of Architecture or permission of instructor. Introduction to lighting design of interiors. Lecture presentations focus on design principles in lighting, lighting quality, lighting quantification codes, and energy conservation. Emphasis is on integration of lighting with interior spaces, techniques in lighting design, fixture design, and exploration of computer visualization. No student may earn credit for both 4573 and 5573. (F)

I D 5713. Commercial Design.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of Graduate Liaison. Introduction to planning processes and the application of design principles to commercial design projects. Space planning process, design philosophy, specifications and oral presentations will be expected on each project. (Sp)

I D 5723. Lighting Design.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of Graduate Liaison. Introduction to lighting design of interiors. Studio/lecture presentations; focus on design principles in lighting, lighting quality, lighting quantification codes, and energy conservation. Emphasis is on integration of lighting with interior spaces, techniques in lighting design, fixture design, and exploration of computer visualization. (F)

I D 5753. History of Interior Design.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with I D 4753) Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of Graduate Liaison. Historical survey of architectural interiors and of the decorative arts. Cultural and socioeconomic factors which influenced interior spaces and furnishings will be an emphasis in addition to readings, lectures and discussion about the art, composition and aesthetic theories that give value to historical interiors. Students may not earn credit for both 4753 and 5753. (Sp)

I D 5763. Graduate Interior Design Computer Application.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of Graduate Liaison. Use of computer-aided design (AutoCAD Architecture, SketchUp, Photoshop and InDesign) and its role in interior design professional practice. Applications to demonstrate design process and problem-solving solutions in two- and three-dimensional representation and modeling. Analysis of the applications of computer-aided design in the interior design industry. (F)

I D 5773. Graduate Interior Construction.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of Graduate Liaison. Introduction to the construction materials and methods, building and finish materials used in the design of non-loadbearing interior construction. Intended to develop an accurate and efficient expression of selection and detailing of materials and assemblies in construction drawings. Additional topics include mechanical and electrical systems, building codes, and planning standards. (Sp)

I D 5793. Interior Materials and Specifications.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of Graduate Liaison. Study of the basic characteristics and installation of materials and finishes used in the design of interiors, building codes, fire safety, and regulations for accessibility. Emphasis on writing specifications for FF&E and non-loadbearing construction. (F)

I D 5823. Design for Independent Living.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with ID 4823) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Students will be introduced to aging in place design and universal design that supports safe, comfortable and independent living for users as they age in their residential setting. The course will focus on design determinants, design implications of spatial relationships, scale and function, residential building codes, and design programming as they relate to aging in place homes. No student may earn credit for both 4823 and 5823. (Sp)

I D 5940. Field Work.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in College of Architecture or permission of instructor. Field study related to the student's interest in architectural lighting approved by graduate liaison. One credit hour per 120 hours of fieldwork or equivalent. Documentation and evaluation required. (F, Sp, Su)

I D 5950. Masters of Science in Interior Design Project.2-6 Credit Hours.

2 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: Permission of director/graduate coordinator. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Professional project of significant scale and complexity in the student's area of concentration. (F, Sp)

I D 5960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing; permission of instructor, adviser and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. (F, Sp)

I D 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

I D 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-6 Credit Hours.

2 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: Permission of director/graduate coordinator. Variable enrollment, two to six hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, 6 hours. (F, Sp)

I D 5990. Special Studies.1-6 Credit Hours.

1 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor, adviser and dean. The opportunity is provided for students with above-average grades to do individual library or laboratory work on special problems not included in present courses. (F, Sp)

Faculty

Last Name First/Middle Name Middle init. OU Service start Title(s), date(s) appointed Degrees Earned, Schools, Dates Completed
Bhattacharjee Suchismita 2013 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN, 2013; GRADUATE LIAISON INTERIOR DESIGN, 2015 PhD, Virginia Polytechnic Inst, 2010; MS, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 2010; MS, Michigan State Univ, 2007; BS, Jadavpur Univ, 2005
Holcomb Chelsea 2021 Lecturer Masters of Architecture, Univ of Oklahoma; BFA, Interior Design, Univ of Central Oklahoma
Kile Mia S 2012 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN, 2012; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2013 MFA, Univ of North Texas, 2003; BFA, Univ of North Texas, 1998
Matin Negar 2019 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN, 2019 PhD, Technology (Concentration on Interior Design), Eastern Michigan Univ; MS, Architecture, Tabriz Art Univ; BS, Architecture, Chamran Univ of Ahvaz
Pober Elizabeth F 2004 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN, 2014 MS, Univ of Oklahoma, 2004; B Interior Design, Univ of Oklahoma, 2003
Proietti Tiziana 2018 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERIOR DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE, 2018 PhD in Architectural Design, Univ of Rome Sapienze, 2013; Masters of Architecture, Univ of Rome Sapienze, 2008