Department of Psychology

Jorge Mendoza, Interim Chair
705 Dale Hall Tower
455 W. Lindsey St.
Norman, OK 73019-2007
Phone: (405) 325-4511
FAX: (405) 325-4737
vwillis@ou.edu
www.ou.edu/cas/psychology

General Information

The Department of Psychology was founded in 1928. The primary emphasis of the department is on psychology as an experimental and applied science. At the present time, the department is focused on the areas of cognitive psychology, social psychology, quantitative psychology, industrial/organizational psychology, developmental psychology, neuroscience, personality/individual differences.

At the undergraduate level, our department offers students an exceptional education that is flexible enough to support a wide range of career paths. Our undergraduate degree programs provide students with the opportunity to develop the type of broad and rich introduction to scientific psychology that will support a wide variety of post-graduate interests, whether they are to further graduate training in such areas as clinical or experimental psychology, pursue graduate training in other professional areas, such as medicine, law, or business, or to immediately seek meaningful employment in the contemporary workplace. 

The programs of graduate training in the department are designed to produce experimental psychologists who are capable of assuming positions in academia, as well as industry and government. In a rigorous but cooperative and congenial atmosphere, high-quality research psychologists are trained to contribute to the body of knowledge of scientific psychology, as well as to disseminate and apply psychological knowledge.

The department provides research training by means of a curriculum that requires students to be involved in research beginning with their first enrollment and continuing every semester thereafter.

Programs & Facilities

Laboratory and Teaching Facilities

The laboratory and teaching facilities of the Department of Psychology include the Brain and Cognitive Development lab, Snyder Lab, Center for the Study of Human Operator Performance (C-SHOP), Mumford Lab, Day Lab, and Connelly Lab. SONA is a website that the Department uses to manage all experiments.See Undergraduate Research Opportunities for more details.

Scholarships and Financial Aid

At the undergraduate level, the department offers The Outstanding Psychology Students (TOPS) scholarships to outstanding psychology students with at least junior standing and a superior record in coursework.

At the graduate level, the department has been able to provide financial support to most of those students wishing to be supported. Summer support is available on a competitive basis. The Charles Gettys Award and a Graduate Student Teaching Award are presented annually for outstanding research and teaching by a graduate student in the department.

Student Organizations

The University of Oklahoma Psychology Club's purpose is to encourage, stimulate, and maintain excellence in psychology and to facilitate and further knowledge in psychology among students. 

Psi Chi is the National Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of psychology. Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate men and women who are making the study of psychology one of their major interests.

Undergraduate Study

Students considering a major in psychology should contact an academic advisor in the Department of Psychology.

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology provides the student with experience and training necessary to pursue post-baccalaureate education in psychology and other professional areas or to secure employment immediately following completion of the undergraduate degree, and with the broad education essential to the formation of a well-rounded, informed individual.

Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Science in Psychology is designed to provide additional training and experience in research to those students who want greater mastery in basic sciences and methodology. The B.S. degree program is most appropriate for those students who want to significantly enhance their competitive standing for admission to doctoral training in psychology - although it should be noted that the majority of our B.A. degree students have been highly successful in achieving graduate school acceptance as well. 

Minors

Careers in Psychology

For an excellent introduction to careers in psychology, with a description of many subfields and job domains, please see the brochure (PDF) published by the American Psychological Association (APA).

Psychologists assume many different roles. For example, they work as teachers, researchers, service providers, administrators, and consultants. Because psychologists perform such diverse tasks, they work in many different settings: colleges and universities, elementary and secondary schools, private practices, hospitals, human service agencies, business and industry, and government.

The following are just some of the fields that graduates with bachelor's degrees in psychology have entered: administration and management, business and industry, casework, child care, employment interviewing, health services, marketing and public relations, personnel, probation and parole, psychiatric assisting, research or laboratory assisting, sales, teaching, and technical writing. Students pursuing the bachelor's degree as a terminal degree are encouraged to seek academic counseling on an intensive level with a faculty advisor, and to consult closely with the University's job placement service.

Graduate Study

Areas of Specialization

Areas of specialization in graduate training include cognitive psychology, social psychology, industrial-organizational, and quantitative psychology. In addition to these four specializations, researchers in the department also work in one or more of three integrative, cross-cutting specialties: developmental, neuroscience, and personality/individual differences.

The programs of graduate training in the department are designed to produce experimental psychologists who are capable of assuming positions in academia, as well as industry and government. In a rigorous but cooperative and congenial atmosphere, high-quality research psychologists are trained to contribute to the body of knowledge of scientific psychology, as well as to disseminate and apply psychological knowledge.

Graduate Certificates

Degree Programs

Master of Arts 

The Department of Psychology offers an innovative Master of Arts in Organizational Dynamics program at the Schusterman Center at OU-Tulsa. The program emphasizes research combined with practical application. After completing core courses, students specialize in one of three general tracks: Organizational DynamicsHuman Resource Management or Project Management. Students interested in this program should consult with faculty members at OU-Tulsa.

Master of Science 

The Master of Science in Psychology degree is conferred as a mark of progress toward the Ph.D. or as a terminal degree.

The Master of Science in Industrial Organizational Psychology provides students with the knowledge and research skills needed to study human motivation, performance, and well-being in the workplace. Students are also provided with opportunities to work on real-world projects, in both academic and industrial settings, that examine the application of psychological principles and findings to workforce management. The primary objective of the I/O Psychology program is to train individuals seeking the Ph.D. degree to conduct research and to practice in the areas of industrial psychology and organizational behavior. 

Doctor of Philosophy

To complete the Ph.D. program in either standard Psychology or Industrial and Organizational Psychology, a student must complete 90 hours of coursework beyond the bachelor’s degree. The individual student, in consultation with a faculty advisory committee, will design a unique course of study that reflects the student’s interests and career goals. Successful completion of all coursework, the Ph.D. general exams, and the dissertation is required for the Ph.D. 

Students interested in our Quantitative program also take two courses from the mathematics department: Calculus-based mathematical statistics and linear algebra. The pre-requisite calculus courses for these may be taken at OU if the student does not have them at the time of admission.

General Requirements for MS and Ph.D.

A continuing involvement in directed or independent research is expected to be a part of the student’s program of doctoral study. The department has no language requirements, but a student’s Advisory Committee may recommend the development of competence in other areas of study (e.g., computer science, industrial engineering, mathematics, philosophy of science, history of science, physiology) of potential benefit to the student’s particular professional development and interests.

As a vital part of the graduate training program in psychology, all graduate students are required to be engaged in a training assignment each term. These assignments vary according to the needs and professional aspirations of the student. They are designed to supplement the more formal coursework by a variety of pre-professional activities such as assisting in research, teaching, etc., under faculty supervision. The training assignment increases in responsibility as the student progresses. The amount of time required of the student varies from 10–20 hours per week, depending upon level of progress, the type of assignment, etc. The purpose of these assignments is to train the student in some of the types of activities that the student will ultimately be engaged in after the degree is received.

A student’s progress toward the Ph.D. degree is evaluated annually. Additionally, first-year students are evaluated after the first semester. The purpose of these evaluations is to provide feedback to the student and to assess the student’s proficiency based on academic coursework, progress in research, and potential for significant contributions to the profession.

Courses

ODYN 5113. The Psychology of Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Focuses on the theories, principles, and practice of leadership in organizational settings; particular focus on technologically based organizations, leading change in organizations, and leading teams. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5123. Survey of Organizational Dynamics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to the Organizational Dynamics program or instructor's consent. Overview of theories and practices used in human resource management; project management; and knowledge management. Emphasis is on research methodologies and key theories relevant to each of the three substantive area, as well as application of general principles of each of the three areas in the workforce, considering individual, group and organizational levels. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5133. Teams and Motivation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Team formation, socialization and identity, team problem solving, individual and collective motivation, conflict and power, learning and team development, and group liabilities. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5153. Design, Evaluation, and Statistics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Covers applied research designs such as quasi-experimental and correlation designs; covers basic statistics, hypothesis testing, correlation/multiple regression, and quality control models. Focus will be on application of statistics in organizational problem solving. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5163. Applied Measurement and Analysis.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Focuses on teaching principles and practices of individual and organizational assessment, covering concepts such as validity, reliability, survey and instrument development, and characteristics of organizational data. Techniques for analyzing organizational data and conducting program evaluation will also be discussed. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5183. Capstone Project.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and ODYN 5973, or permission of instructor. This capstone project will involve real-world application of the material covered in the program. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5223. Performance Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Covers basic approaches to motivating and developing individuals to perform well within organizational settings; includes discussion of alternative methods for measuring and assessing individual, team, and organizational performance. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5233. Training and Career Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Overview of principles, theories, and practices of learning and development in organizations. Application of various training techniques and designs will be covered as well as roles of different organizational constituencies in employee training and development. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5243. Staffing, Selection, and Compensation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Focuses on recent, state-of-the-art processes and technologies for organizational staffing, personnel selection, and employee benefits and pay. Relevant theories in these areas will be reviewed. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5253. Organizational Behavior, Change, and Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Explores theories and practices related to the planned process of changing an organization or group's culture to increase organizational productivity and effectiveness. Topics such as organizational assessment and diagnosis, continuous learning, problem solving sessions, reward systems, visioning, and empowerment will be covered. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5263. Human Resource Management Systems and Techniques.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Survey of theory and practice in primary areas of human resource management such as workforce planning, recruiting, selection and staffing, performance management, compensation, and training and development. Focuses on a systems approach to human resource management, including how aspects of HRM are interrelated, as well as strategies and technologies being used to perform various HRM functions. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5283. Employee Health, Safety and Wellness.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Focuses on health, safety and wellness issues relevant to the workplace. Individual, social, situational and environmental factors that affect workplace health, safety and wellness will be covered, including topics such as: stress and burnout; work-life conflict; workplace safety and injury prevention; legal and regulatory compliance; and workplace conflict, aggression, and violence. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5293. Work and Life Integration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. This course is designed to teach students about the interactive relationship between the family system and the work system. With the changing demographics of the workforce comes a stronger need to assess the relationship between these two major areas of life on one another. Such topics as work/family conflict, childcare issues, role conflict, marital satisfaction, and work satisfaction are covered. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5313. Planning Processes and Strategy Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Overview of principles and practices of planning and strategy development. Planning processes will be examined at micro as well as macro organizational levels; organizational strategies such as succession planning and workforce planning will be discussed. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5323. The Psychology and Practice of Project Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Focuses on strategies and steps involved in developing project proposals and work plans. Includes topics such as needs assessment, budgeting, resource utilization, managing diverse project teams, troubleshooting, and others. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5333. Customer Service and Market Analysis.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Principles, theories and applications of market analysis and customer service will be reviewed; techniques for gathering, assessing, and analyzing market and customer data will be covered; and techniques for improving customer service will be discussed. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5343. Organizational Communication.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Overview of theories and systems of communication in organizational settings. Various forms and effectiveness of communication as well as purposes and strategies at different organizational levels will be covered. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5353. Global Business Practices and Ethics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Covers the relationship between organizations and global markets. Explores how organizational systems work together to meet global demands, system breakdowns, and assessment of organizational performance. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5383. Emerging Topics in Project Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. In-depth examination of existing and emerging issues and problems facing project management professionals who work as internal or external consultants. May include issues such as risk management, project selection, conflict resolution, and strategic management decision processes. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5393. Creativity and Innovation in Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. This course focuses on theories of creativity and its assessment at the individual, group/team, and organizational level. Assumptions and predictions of the theories will be presented and discussed. A special focus will be on the stages of creative processes and their facilitation. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5413. Positive People Practices.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. Positive people practices are those practices undertaken by organizations that seek to treat five stakeholder groups (society, partners, investors, customers, and employees) as equally important to achieving the organization's vision and mission. This class will discuss a variety of positive people practices and examine diverse organizations that implement such policies effectively. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5513. Knowledge Management in Project-Driven Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. This class will focus on the 3rd generation of knowledge management and do so with a project-centric strategy. It is a project-centric environment that makes knowledge management most feasible for active, growing organizations. Students will learn methods and tools they can use to bring a sense of order to organizational knowledge. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

ODYN 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

ODYN 5973. Proposing and Presenting Research.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to Organizational Dynamics master's program. Students in the course will learn to (a) read, synthesize and summarize existing research in organizational dynamics; (b) develop a research proposal that is founded in real world problems, that is based on sound research principles, and that meets accepted standards for professional and scholarly publication. The proposal, on approval of the faculty, may serve as the prospectus for either the professional project or the master's thesis. (F, Sp)

ODYN 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Supervised research in area agreed upon by the student and the instructor. (F, Sp, Su)

ODYN 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PSY 1113. Elements of Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the scientific study of human behavior. Emphasis is placed upon scientific method, basic life processes, mechanisms of adaption, individual differences and group behavior. Students have the opportunity to be exposed to the research process either by serving as participants in research experiments or by conducting reviews of research topics. (F, Sp, Su) [III-SS].

PSY 2001. Career Exploration for Psychology.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113 or concurrent enrollment. This course will explore the range of career options in psychology and other fields available to those with bachelor's and graduate psychology degrees, and provide academic planning assistance. Sub-disciplines within the field of psychology will be examined as well as graduate school application processes. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 2003. Understanding Statistics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Math 0123 or satisfactory score on math placement test. An introductory applied statistics course which will focus on descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Emphasis will be placed on in-class activities and homework which help the student learn by experience. Topics include measures of central tendency and variability, z-scores, normal distribution, correlation, regression, sampling distributions, hypotheses testing, t-tests and chi-square tests. Laboratory (F, Sp, Su) [I-M].

PSY 2403. Introduction to Personality.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113 or permission of instructor. Introduces the classic theoretical perspectives in personality psychology and establishes a solid foundation for understanding personality dynamics. The emphasis is on personality theories representing (but not limited to) the psychodynamic, trait, cognitive, behavioral, and humanistic perspectives. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 2503. Computing for Behavioral Sciences.3 Credit Hours.

Students will learn to identify the parts and functions of personal computers. Building on that basic knowledge, such topics as developing and publishing a web page, collecting data from participants through the web, and using the advanced features of Excel for statistical analysis will be covered. Programming languages will include HTML and JavaScript. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 2603. Lifespan Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113. Survey of the psychological changes across the life span; the changes in cognitive, social, emotional, and physiological development from conception to death will be included. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 2970. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research, and field projects. (Irreg.)

PSY 3003. Advanced Undergraduate Statistics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 2003 or PSY 2113. Review of previous material, SAS, multiple comparisons, two-way ANOVA, power calculations, repeated measures designs, multiple linear regression, general linear model, nonparametric methods. Designed to help students prepare for graduate statistics courses. (Irreg.)

PSY 3083. Animal Behavior.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with ZOO 3083) Prerequisite: Zoology 2013 or permission of instructor. Animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective. The effects of natural selections on mechanisms underlying behavior and on diversity of behavior among and within species. (F, Sp)

PSY 3114. Research Methods: Applications and Experimental Design.4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113; PSY 2003 or PSY 2113. Examines how new discoveries are made in psychology through the scientific method. Primary goal is to prepare students to conduct an independent research project to address a theoretical question, analyze and interpret the data, and present the data to others in both written and oral form. Laboratory. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 3203. Cognitive Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113. Surveys how people extract relevant information from their environment and store, retrieve and utilize such information at a later time. Topics will include memory storage and retrieval, attention, imagery, mnemonic devices and other cognitive processes. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSY 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor; May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 3613. Developmental Psychology: Infancy through Adolescence.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113; PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, or permission of instructor. Introduces themes, theories, and scientific research on cognitive, social, and emotional development from infancy through adolescence. Explores fundamental psychological questions of how we become who we are, what factors cause children's development of behavior and mind, and what leads to the diversity of developmental outcomes. No student may earn credit for both PSY 2603 and PSY 3613. (Irreg.)

PSY 3703. Social Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113; PSY 2003 or PSY 2113. The science of how people think and feel about, relate to, and influence one another. Topics include classic and contemporary research on stereotypes, persuasion, attitude change, emotions, the self-concept, aggression, impression formation, and altruism, among others. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 3753. Introduction to Industrial Organizational Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113 and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113 or permission of instructor. Industrial Organizational psychology covers psychological theories and their practical applications to the workplace. The course covers issues of critical relevance to the well-being of individuals and organizational performance. Topics include, but are not limited to, motivation, selection, training, assessment, performance management, satisfaction, teams, and leadership. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 3803. Physiological Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113 or equivalent and BIOL 1114 or equivalent. Provides an introduction to physiological and neurological foundations of behavior. Some emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues and theoretical models. (F, Sp)

PSY 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program, PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will consist of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program; PSY 2003 or PSY 2113. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. The projects covered will vary. The content will deal with concepts not usually presented in regular coursework. (Irreg.)

PSY 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program, PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general area to be studied, PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit, six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 4023. Psychological Test and Measurements.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113, and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113; and junior standing. An introduction to the measurement of human behavior. Special emphasis is given to tests of intelligence, achievement, personality, and interest. (Irreg.)

PSY 4113. Capstone Survey of Major Fields in Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 3114 or permission of instructor, senior standing. Lecture-based course focusing on major areas of psychology. Attempts to instill in the student an understanding of the integration and diversity of the field of psychology. Content and title vary with instructor. (F, Sp) [V].

PSY 4143. Capstone Service Learning.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 2403, PSY 3114, PSY 4453, senior standing and permission of instructor. Students apply learning from other courses to a project of significant community need. Classes are held both on campus and on-site. Students will develop a written description of the experience and the psychological principles applied. (F, Sp) [V].

PSY 4243. Decision Making and Problem Solving.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, and PSY 3203. Review of issues in inductive thinking, deductive reasoning, inference generation, problem solving, insight, expertise, algorithms, and heuristics. The emphasis will be on current research investigations. (Irreg.)

PSY G4253. Selected Topics in Cognitive Science.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113 and PSY 3114 and PSY 3203, and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113; or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 6 hours. Seminar focusing on specific issues in cognitive science. Topics include memory representation and retrieval, symbol and referent processing, knowledge structure, expert and novice differences, imagery, and others. (Irreg.)

PSY 4263. Psychology and Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3114. Examines some of the most important points of contact between the fields of psychology and the law, including eyewitness identification, the prison system, juries, and confessions and interrogations. (Irreg.)

PSY G4313. Motivation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 2003 or PSY 2113. Primary motivational states and learned motivational states (e.g., fear, frustration, anxiety, etc.) will be considered as well as emotion and curiosity. Topics of current interest in both human and animal motivation will also be covered. (Irreg.)

PSY 4343. Health Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113 or an introductory Biology course. Health psychology examines the bi-directional relationship between psychology and health. Topics include, but are not limited to, physiological and psychological factors that influence perceptions of stress, the links between stress and illness, the psychosocial influences on health enhancing and health compromising behaviors, adjustment to illness and coping, pain, sociocultural factors and health, and personality and health. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY G4403. Advanced Personality.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113, PSY 2403, and junior standing or permission of instructor. Advanced personality course focusing on modern and current theoretical and empirical research. Introduces the research methods personality psychologists use to make substantive contributions to the scientific understanding of human thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Topics include (but are not limited to) field dependence, autonomy, sex/gender, subjective well-being, dominance, leadership, sensation-seeking, risk-taking, pain tolerance, sensation reducing/augmenting, and locus of control. (Irreg.)

PSY 4433. Clinical Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113, PSY 2003 or 2113, and PSY 4453. A survey of the field of Clinical Psychology. Topics include but are not limited to the following: Current Issues in the field, such as training and ethics; Psychological assessment; and Psychotherapy. Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology (EBPP) is emphasized. (F, Sp)

PSY G4453. Abnormal Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113 and PSY 2403, and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113; or permission of instructor. An examination of the major clinical and research findings in the field of abnormal psychology. Topics include studies of conflict, anxiety, neurosis, character disorders, schizophrenia, and psychotherapy. (F, Sp)

PSY 4510. Applications of Psychology Practicum.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, 12 hours of psychology, permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours; undergraduates limited to two enrollments. Individualized field experiences in an area of interest in psychology. (F, Sp)

PSY 4523. Sport & Exercise Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113, and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, and junior standing; or instructor permission. Course discusses how psychological principles can be used by physical educators, coaches, and athletes in everyday situations and to cultivate peak performance and personal growth, and also many practical issues relevant to students, such as anxiety and stress; confidence and coping strategies; skill acquisition and training; attention control; goal setting; self-regulation; coaching and leadership, cohesion; burnout; injuries; and career options. (Irreg.)

PSY G4613. Current Topics in Developmental Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, and PSY 2603 or PSY 3613; or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 6 hours. An advanced seminar dealing with contemporary issues in developmental psychology. Content will vary with the instructor. (Irreg.)

PSY G4633. Social and Personality Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: PSY 1113, and PSY 2603 or PSY 3613. Explores theory and research in social and personality development from infancy through adolescence. Topics covered include attachment, temperament, emotional development, moral development, peer relationships, gender development, prosocial and antisocial behavior, and the influence of parenting, child care, and other important developmental contexts on the behavior and adjustment of children and adolescents. (Irreg.)

PSY G4703. Psychology of Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor. Provide students with an understanding of the psychological principles underlying leadership in government, industry, and society. Review psychological research on leadership and management, examining topics such as leadership skills, leading changes in organization, leader-follower relationships, and leadership tactics. Students will participate in various exercises to analyze leadership strategies and assess their potential strengths and weaknesses as leaders. (Sp)

PSY 4733. Selected Topics in Social Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated once with change of topic; maximum credit six hours. Content varies with the instructor. Deals with central topical areas of study in social psychology (i.e., attitudes and social cognition; person perception; groups and group dynamics; or theory construction). (Irreg.)

PSY 4793. Psychology of Groups.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Provides students with an understanding of the psychological principles underlying group behavior. Topics covered will include group formation and development, cohesion and norms, social influence, power, inter-group relations, stereotyping and prejudice, group decision making, diversity within groups, stigma in the workplace, social identity, leadership in groups, group performance, and staffing organizational groups. (Irreg.)

PSY 4910. Instructional Aides.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSY 1113 and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113; junior standing (or honors students); majors with grade point averages of at least 3.00 and acceptance of an application, or by invitation by faculty member. May be repeated once, maximum credit six hours. Designed for students contemplating graduate school to offer experience in all aspects of instruction. Individual assignments of special instructional tasks in psychology. Supervised instructional experience will be part of each enrollment. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 4913. Bachelor Of Science Thesis.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2113, 3114, admission to B.S. program in psychology and permission of B.S. adviser. B.S. candidates are required to generate an independent research project, under the direct supervision of their specific faculty sponsor and overseen by the B.S. adviser. This course will be used for this function and only this function. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY G4920. Current Topics in Basic and Applied Psychology.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSY 1113, and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113; May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 9 hours. Content and number of credit hours varies with instructor and section. Focus on current topics in psychology not covered in existing course offerings. Intended for purpose of offering high interest course topics during regular semester, summer, and intersession. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY G4940. Seminar in Psychology.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSY 1113, and PSY 2003 or PSY 2113; and junior standing; or departmental permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 6 hours. Advanced seminar dealing with contemporary issues and problems in psychology. Content varies with instructor. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

PSY 4970. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics. 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; Maximum credit nine hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research, and field projects. (Irreg.)

PSY 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: PSY 2003 or PSY 2113, PSY 3114, three courses in general area to be studied, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 5003. Psychological Statistics I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing and undergraduate statistics course, or permission of instructor. Applied statistics with emphasis upon statistical problems in behavioral sciences research. Includes probability, descriptive statistics, estimations and test of hypotheses. Techniques covered in depth include t-test, one and two factor ANOVA methods, multiple comparison methods (e.g., Scheff, Tukey, Ryan, etc.), and the robustness of these techniques to violation of their assumptions.

PSY 5013. Psychological Statistics II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5003 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. The general linear model is covered as it applies to the analysis of variance including fixed, mixed, and random models, individual comparisons, analysis of covariance, and multiple regression. Also, some nonparametric techniques are discussed including chi-square and distribution free procedures.

PSY 5203. Survey in Cognitive Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission. Survey of the field of cognitive psychology designed to provide a foundation for the study of human higher mental processes. Topics include: pattern recognition, attention, episodic memory, semantic memory, psycholinguistics, comprehension, reasoning, decision making and problem solving.

PSY 5280. Seminar in Cognitive Processes.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: 5203 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Considers special topics in cognitive psychology emphasizing recent research literature.

PSY 5403. Survey in Developmental Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing in the department or permission of instructor. Survey of classic and contemporary research in developmental psychology. (Irreg.)

PSY 5423. Current Theories in Social Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of instructor. An overview of current theory and research in social psychology, including such topics as motivated cognition, automatic and controlled processing, stereotyping, impression formation, attributions, the self-concept and self-regulation, relationships, emotions, attitudes, altruism, and aggression. (Irreg.)

PSY 5433. Classic Issues in Social Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. An overview of classic theories and studies from the first 100 years of social psychology. Topics include attitudes and persuasion, group processes, attraction, social influence, conformity, helping, aggression, dissonance, emotions, and attribution. (Irreg.)

PSY 5703. Survey of Industrial Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. This course is intended to provide an overview of the key principles and practices of Industrial/Organizational psychology with an emphasis on work analysis and the selection, assessment, and development of human resources. This course will also examine legal and ethical issues faced by I/O psychologists as well as strategic workforce planning. (Irreg.)

PSY 5713. Training and Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5703. Design and development of training courses as well as practical considerations in the delivery of training in organizational settings. (Sp)

PSY 5723. Selection and Assessment in Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5703. Covers a variety of substantive topics including; the choice and design of personnel selection tools, validation of employment tests, legal issues regarding personnel assessment and selection, assessment of intelligence, experience, personality and integrity, the use of common assessment methods such as situational judgment tests, interviews, biodata, and assessment centers, frame-of-reference training, theoretical and empirical literature regarding assessment center technology, and development and administration of an assessment center. (Irreg.)

PSY 5733. Techniques in Industrial and Organizational Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5703. Provides an overview of how to develop and apply several methodologies and techniques that I/O psychologists commonly use to address organizational needs. During this course we will explore topics such as basic consulting skills, job analysis, individual assessment and selection, biodata, performance appraisal, ad organizational surveys. Some basic familiarity with these areas is assumed. This class focuses on how to develop and implement these types of applications in organizational settings. (Irreg.)

PSY 5743. Survey of Organizational Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. The purpose of this course is to provide a broad overview of important topics defining organizational psychology and organizational behavior from a psychological perspective, covering topics such as organizational socialization, commitment, networks and culture, conflict and negotiation, organizational change, and counterproductive work behavior. (Irreg.)

PSY 5783. Seminar in I/O Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing; May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credits 12 hours. The purpose of this course is to provide a general course number that can be repeated with a change of content. A variety of courses will be taught under this number such as Organizational Cognition, Organizational Ethics, Innovation in Organizations, and Individual Differences. (Irreg.)

PSY 5901. Foundations of Psychological Science I.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: admission to graduate psychology program. Overview of current research in psychological science. Discussion of ethics, professional development, the pedagogical arts, methodology and grantsmanship. Participants complete a first year research project including a grant proposal, presentation at a professional meeting and presentation at departmental speaker series.

PSY 5911. Foundations of Psychological Science II.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: 5901. Continuation of 5901. Advanced topics in professional development, research planning, funding and communication.

PSY 5960. Directed Readings in Psychology.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, permission of instructor, adviser and dean. Maximum credit nine hours. Supervised reading of selected topics in psychology by agreement of instructor and student. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 5970. Pre-Master's Research in Psychology.1-4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing; pre-master's status; permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Supervised research in area agreed upon by student and instructor. Students conducting research for the master's thesis should enroll in 5980. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

Variable enrollment, two to nine hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, four hours. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PSY 6013. Factor Analysis and Structural Equation Models.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5003, 5013 or equivalent. Several exploratory factor analysis models are discussed including principle factors, maximum likelihood, and alpha-factors analysis. Factor-analytic-like models such as components analysis and image analysis are also covered. Offers an overview of the application of structural equations in the social sciences. (Irreg.)

PSY 6023. Statistical Models of Tests Scores.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5003, 5013 or equivalent. Topics include classical test theory, item-sampling theories, latent ability test theory, item analysis and test validation. (Irreg.)

PSY 6063. Seminar in Quantitative Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5013 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit 15 hours. The topic or topics to be covered depend upon the faculty member or members in charge of the seminar at the time it is offered.

PSY 6073. Experimental Design for Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5003, 5013, or permission of instructor. Classical experimental design applied to research problems in the behavioral sciences; completely randomized, randomized blocks, factorial, Latin square, fractional factorial and repeated measures designs, confounding, and related topics are discussed. (F)

PSY 6223. Quantitative Models in Cognition.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5203 or permission. Survey of quantitative models in cognition, with an emphasis on memory and reaction time. Techniques for model testing and development will be taught and supported by exercises.

PSY 6280. Advanced Seminar in Cognitive Processes.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: 5203 or permission. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit 12 hours. Special topics in human learning and memory or in memory and cognitive processes will be considered in detail, emphasizing recent research literature and development of research proposals. (Irreg.)

PSY 6423. Seminar in Social Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit nine hours. Intensive study of major problem areas in social psychology, including intrapersonal processes, group dynamics, the self, and research methods. Course topic will vary. (Irreg.)

PSY 6433. Seminar in Theories of Personality.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing in Psychology or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive exploration of both traditional and modern theories of personality. Examples from several major categories of personality theory are examined through intensive primary readings, writing, and discussion. (Irreg.)

PSY 6453. Seminar in Interpersonal Relationships.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Covers classic and contemporary theories and findings in the social psychological literature on interpersonal relationships, with a focus on the biological, motivations, social and personality factors that contribute to attraction, closeness, satisfaction, and stability in dyadic relationships. (Irreg.)

PSY 6643. Seminar in Developmental Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit 12 hours. Involves in-depth study of theory and research in major areas of developmental psychology, e.g., social cognition, peer relations, emotions, temperament and personality, morality, aggression, theory of mind. (Irreg.)

PSY 6703. Advanced Seminar in Industrial and Organizational Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5703. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Focus in-depth on one or more topics examining the area with respect to new theoretical developments and major research findings. Topics may include active, emergent research areas likely to lead to changes in theoretical and professional practice including motivation, team effectiveness, work and family issues, changes in job design, etc. (Sp)

PSY 6713. Leadership Theories, Research, and Practice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5703. This graduate seminar examines the theoretical and empirical research as well as case studies on a variety of topics in the field of leadership, leadership dyads, outstanding forms of leadership (transformational, charismatic, pragmatic), politics, leading innovation and change, assessing leadership effectiveness, gender and leadership, and cross-cultural leadership. (Irreg.)

PSY 6910. Readings in Psychology.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: advanced graduate standing (post-master's). May be repeated; maximum graduate credit nine hours. Supervised reading for advanced students. Topics chosen by agreement of instructor and student.

PSY 6923. History of Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Introduction to origin of modern psychology within science. Origins are examined from the ancient Greeks through philosophy, physiology, and astronomy. Special emphasis placed on the historical trends and the people involved.

PSY 6930. Res-Cognitive Process, Sensation-Perception, Physiological Psy.1-6 Credit Hours.

1 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: by permission of instructor only. May be repeated; maximum graduate credit eighteen hours. Supervised laboratory research on major projects in an area of mutual interest with a faculty member. Upon advice of the instructor involved, enrollment for work on minor research projects in the above areas may alternatively be in 4990. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 6940. Research in Personality: Social and Developmental Psychology.1-6 Credit Hours.

1 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: by permission of instructor only. May be repeated; maximum graduate credit 18 hours. Supervised individual laboratory research on major projects in an area of mutual interest with a faculty member. Upon advice of the instructor involved, enrollment for work on minor research projects in the above areas may alternatively be in 4990. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 6960. Research in Industrial and Organizational Psychology.1-6 Credit Hours.

1 to 6 hours. Prerequisite: 5703 and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Provide guided research experiences preparatory for master's and doctoral degrees. Topics selected in consultation with faculty member may include leadership, management ethics, and motivation. Exposure to key aspects of the research process including literature reviews, study design, data analysis, report preparation, proposal writing, paper presentation, and article writing. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 6970. Post-Master's Research in Psychology.1-4 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: master's degree and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Supervised research for advanced graduate students on major projects of mutual interest with a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

PSY 6980. Research for Doctoral Dissertation.2-16 Credit Hours.

(F, Sp, Su)

PSY 6990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

Faculty 

Last Name First/Middle Name Middle init. OU Service start Title(s), date(s) appointed Degrees Earned, Schools, Dates Completed
Barnes Jennifer 2012 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY PhD, Yale Univ
Burgett Jennifer L 2012 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2018; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION, 2018 PhD, Yale Univ, 2012; M. Phil, Cambridge Univ, 2007; BA, Yale Univ, 2006
Campbell Nicole J 2000 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2008 PhD, Arizona State Univ, 1997; MA, Arizona State Univ, 1993; BS, Texas A&M Univ, 1990
Carvallo Mauricio R 2007 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2013 PhD, SUNY at Buffalo, 2007; MA, SUNY at Buffalo, 2003; BA, Univ of California-Los Angeles, 1998
Cavazos Jenel N 2003 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2015; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2015 PhD, Univ of Oklahoma, 2009; MS, Univ of Oklahoma, 2006; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 2003
Chevalier Tess 2018 LECTURER Ph.D., University of Wyoming
Cokely Edward T 2015 PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2018; PRESIDENTIAL RESEARCH PROFESSOR, 2015 PhD, Florida State Univ, 2007; MS, Florida State Univ, 2003; BA, Cal State Univ-Fresno, 2001
Connelly Shane PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY PhD, George Mason Univ
Connelly Mumford Mary S 1999 ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2011; PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2014 PhD, George Mason Univ, 1995; MA, George Mason Univ, 1992; BA, Loyola College, 1989
Day Eric A 2001 PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2014 PhD, Texas A&M Univ, 1998; MS, Central Florida Univ, 1993; BS, James Madison Univ, 1991
Ethridge Lauren ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY PhD, Univ of Georgia
Feltz Adam 2018 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2018 PhD, Florida State Univ
Freeman Erin K 2017 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2017 PhD, Univ of Oklahoma
Fuenzalida Luz-Eugenia 2007 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2007 PhD, Univ of Oklahoma, 2000; MS, Univ of Oklahoma 1997; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1994
Gronlund Scott D 1989 PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2002; ROGER AND SHERRY TEIGEN PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2008; ASSOCIATE CHAIR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2017 PhD, Indiana Univ, 1986; BA, Univ of California Irvine, 1981
Jang Seulki "Rachel" 2020 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY Ph.D., University of South Florida
Kimball Daniel R 2008 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2008; J.R. MORRIS PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2008 PhD, Univ of California Los Angeles, 2000; JD, Univ of Virginia, 1983; BA, Univ of Virginia, 1979
Kisamore Jennifer L 2003 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT TULSA, 2009; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2013 PhD, Univ of South Florida, 2003; MA, Univ of South Florida, 1999; BA, Univ of South Florida, 1994
Loeffelman Jordan 2020 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY Ph.D., University of Missouri
Mayeux Lara 2004 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2010; ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LIBERAL STUDIES, 2011; CHAIR, INSTITUTIONAL REVIEW BOARD, 2013 PhD, Univ of Connecticut, 2003; MA, Univ of Connecticut, 2000; BS, Texas Christian Univ, 1998
Mendoza Jorge L 1991 PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 1991 PhD, Univ of Oklahoma, 1974; MS, Univ of Oklahoma, 1972; BA, Univ of Illinois, 1970
Mumford Michael 1999 PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 1999; DIRECTOR, CENTER FOR APPLIED BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, 2004; GEORGE LYNN CROSS RESEARCH PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2005 PhD, Univ of Georgia, 1983; MS, Univ of Georgia, 1981; BA, Bucknell, 1979
Shi Dingjing 2020 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY Ph.D., University of Virginia
Snyder Lori A 2004 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2010; DISTINGUISHED FACULTY FELLOW, OFFICE OF THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH, 2016 PhD, Colorado State Univ, 2004; MS, Colorado State Univ, 2001; BA, Earlham College, 1997
Song Hairong 2009 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2009 PhD, Univ of California Davis, 2009
Steinheider Brigitte 2002 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AT TULSA, 2008 PhD, Univ Dusseldorf, 1996; MBA, Univ Dusseldorf, 1992; MS, Univ Dusseldorf, 1990
Terry Robert A 1995 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP, 2003 Ph.D., 1989, North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., 1989, North Carolina at Chapel Hill; B.A., 1982, Oklahoma
Wenger Michael J 2010 PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY, 2010 PhD, SUNY Binghamton, 1994; MS, Univ of Washington, 1989; BS, Univ of Washington, 1982