Department of Classics and Letters

Scott Johnson, Chair
110 Carnegie Building
Norman, OK 73019-4042
Phone: (405) 325-6921
FAX: (405) 325-7713
classicsandletters@ou.edu
www.ou.edu/cas/classicsandletters

General Information

History

In keeping with the wisdom and tradition of placing the study of ancient Greece and Rome at the heart of a strong curriculum the liberal arts and sciences, President David Ross Boyd selected a classicist, William N. Rice, as the first member of the University of Oklahoma’s faculty in 1890.

Rice’s successor, Joseph Paxton, wrote the university’s motto, Civi et Reipublicae (“for the benefit of the citizen and the state”), stating in nuce the university’s institutional mission of providing the “best possible educational experience for our students through excellence in teaching, research and creative activity, and service to the state and society.”

From the Athenian drachma and the Roman sestertius featured above the south doorway of Adams Hall, to the Ionic columns on the front of the Boyd House, the Classical tradition has always been an important part of the University of Oklahoma, and the Department of Classics and Letters has always supported the university’s mission through research and teaching in the languages and cultures of ancient Greece and Rome and their enduring influence on the modern world.

In 1937, the School of Letters was organized to “provide systematic instruction in ancient and modern languages, history, philosophy and comparative literature,” (Oklahoma Daily, August 4, 1937).

A few years later, the School of Letters became a planned program of the College of Arts and Sciences, under the guidance of a committee of faculty members from the core departments of Classics, English, History, Modern Languages, and Philosophy. In 1953, under the direction of Philip J. Nolan, the Classics Department became the administrative home of the Letters program. Since then, the Chair of the Department of Classics also serves as the Director of the Letters program.

To reflect the department’s long-standing commitment to the Letters program and the outstanding job it has done administering it, the department’s name was changed to the Department of Classics and Letters in 1996.

In 2009, President David L. Boren established the Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage (IACH) within the Department of Classics and Letters because he wanted the IACH to promote an interdisciplinary, humanistic approach to the study of the Constitution and constitutionalism.

From its earliest days, the Department of Classics and Letters has supported, and continues to support, OU’s institutional mission by promoting free inquiry and the perpetuation of the humanistic tradition.

Mission

Through teaching, scholarly and creative activity, and service, the Department of Classics and Letters seeks to preserve and promote the study of the culture, history, languages, literature, and philosophy of Greco-Roman antiquity and the enduring influence of Classical ideals on the modern world.

Expanded Statement of Institutional Purpose

The principal mission of the Department of Classics and Letters' curricular program is to provide a traditional liberal arts education that will prepare students to adapt to a variety of settings after graduation. Our programs are based upon the assumption that cultivated intelligence, good judgment, and artistic expression in speech and writing are desirable in and for themselves.

Goals

To build on the strength and reputation for excellence that the department has enjoyed since the earliest history of the University of Oklahoma, our goals are:

  • To advance scholarship in the humanities through research, presentations, publication, and creative activity.
  • To support and promote the university's educational mission by creating and offering courses not only in the College of Arts & Sciences' general education program, but also in specialized areas of study in support of the department's major and minor programs.
  • To promote wider interest in the humanities through public lectures, presentations, and other outreach events.

Research

Faculty members in the Department of Classics and Letters are actively engaged in the research mission of the university. Faculty members' scholarship reflects the department's diverse range of scholarly interests, which include digital humanities, history, language, literature, philosophy, politics, and religion.

Classics and Letters majors have many opportunities for participating in research initiatives with faculty in the department, including Honors Reading, Honors Research, and Mentored Undergraduate Research. Students interested in these opportunities should contact professors or speak with the department's academic advisor.

Scholarships and Financial Aid

The Department of Classics and Letters annually awards scholarships to our outstanding junior and senior majors. The scholarships are open to Letters or Classics majors who have accrued 60 hours (including hours tested out of) and a minimum 3.5 GPA. Some scholarships are for Letters majors only; some for Letters or Classics majors, some for study abroad; one is reserved for students pursing a teaching career in Latin.

The Peggy Chambers Scholarship

Established by an OU alumnus in recognition of Peggy Chambers' outstanding contributions to the Classics and Letters programs. Awarded to outstanding junior or senior Letters major. Number and stipend varies.

The Charles and Julie Daniels Study Abroad Scholarship

Established by a Letters alumna and her husband, both graduates of the University of Oklahoma, for study abroad scholarships. Awarded to outstanding junior or senior Letters major. Number and stipend varies.

The Philip J. Nolan Scholarship

Established by a former student of Philip Nolan. Awarded to outstanding junior or senior Letters major. Number and stipend varies.

The Philip Nolan Memorial Scholarship

Established by the former students, colleagues and friends of Dr. Philip Nolan. Awarded to outstanding senior Letters or major Classics. Number and stipend varies.

The Mary Enod Williams Scholarship

Established by Charles Williams for his mother, Mary Enod Williams a long time public school teacher who graduated from OU with a degree in Latin. Awarded to outstanding Letters or Classics major. Stipend varies.

The Jean Herrick Scholarship

Jean Herrick was a long time member of the Classics Faculty. Awarded annually to a senior Classics major who intends to pursue a teaching career in Latin.

The Danney Glenn Goble Memorial Scholarship

Established by family and friends in memory of Dr. Goble, distinguished teacher and scholar. Any eligible deserving undergraduate Letters major is qualified for either an initial award or a subsequent award if, in the opinion of the selection committee, the student is making satisfactory progress toward graduation and the student needs supplemental financial assistance. For purposes of this scholarship, satisfactory progress shall be deemed to be the achievement of and maintenance of at least a 3.0 overall grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

The Cheryl Walker-Esbaugh Scholarship

Established by an OU alumnus in recognition of Cheryl Walker-Esbaugh's outstanding contributions to the Classics and Letters programs. Awarded to a junior or senior Classics or Letters major with financial need.

The J. Rufus Fears Scholarship

J. Rufus Fears was an exceptionally gifted and respected teacher of Classics at the University of Oklahoma who influenced the lives and shaped the careers of many students. This award was established by donors to recognize Dr. Fears' many contributions to the University of Oklahoma, the immediate community and the state. The Fears Scholarship is for deserving Letters or Classics majors with financial need who have maintained a minimum 3.0 GPA.

The John H. Hanzen Prize for Future Teachers of Latin

This scholarship was established by John Hansen, an instructor in the Department of Classics and Latin, in honor of his father. This prize is awarded to students who have demonstrated a commitment to the teaching of Latin at the high school level in Oklahoma.

The Jack Catlin Scholarship

This scholarship was established by the many students, friends, and colleagues of John S. Catlin, who was chair of the Department of Classics and Letters for over two decades. During that time he taught and advised countless students, and this scholarship honors his devotion to them. This scholarship is awarded to a junior or senior Classics or Letters major with financial need.

The Walker Family Endowed Scholarship

This scholarship was established by Luke Walker (Letters 1994) and his family for deserving Classics or Letters majors who intend to go into a scientific or medical field, including public health and public health policy.

Undergraduate Study

Bachelor of Arts

  • Classical Studies: The Classical Studies major is a traditional liberal arts major for undergraduates with an interest in ancient Greece and Rome. This option is ideal for students who have an interest in ancient Greece and Rome but do not wish to pursue the training in the Greek and Latin languages necessary for admission to graduate school in Classics. With the exception of the required courses in either Latin or Greek, the course materials are in English.

  • Classical Languages: Classical Languages students pursue a more traditional curriculum that emphasizes the study of the Greek and Latin languages. This option is ideal for preparing students to enter upon advanced study in graduate school or seminary, but it will also benefit those desiring solid training in the liberal arts for a variety of careers, such as law, medicine, business, education and government. Students who select this option study both Greek and Latin literature in the original languages and in translation, and they also take courses on all aspects of the ancient world.

  • Latin: The Latin degree option is intended for those who wish to teach Latin at the high school level.

  • Letters: The Letters degree is interdisciplinary, and the curriculum is flexible enough to accommodate most students' interests. The program is based upon the assumption that cultivated intelligence, good judgment, and artistic expression in speech and writing are desirable in and for themselves. The Letters major provides an excellent preparation for advanced study in a variety of academic disciplines.

  • Constitutional Studies: Letters students may pursue a concentration in Constitutional Studies under the supervision of the Institute for the American Constitutional Heritage.

Minors

Courses

CL C 1123. Gods and Heroes in Art.3 Credit Hours.

Students will be introduced to stories of ancient gods, goddesses, heroes, and lovers as they have been depicted by various art forms through the ages. Examples of these art forms will include sculptures, mosaics, frescoes, paintings, theater, and motion pictures. Through exposure to a variety of art, students will craft educated opinions about artistic works, both ancient and modern. (F, Sp) [IV-AF].

CL C 2213. Introduction to Classical Archaeology.3 Credit Hours.

Introductory survey of the archaeological discovery of the ancient civilizations of the Near and Middle East and the Mediterranean World, including the Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Roman, Minoan, Mycenaean, and Greek civilizations. Attention is given to principal sites for each civilization, their discovery, and the techniques and methodology of classical archaeology. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

CL C 2383. Classical Mythology.3 Credit Hours.

Lectures, with assigned readings. The origin and development of Greek and Roman myths indispensable for the understanding of ancient and modern literature; with allusion to their influence on art and religion. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC] .

CL C 2413. Medical Vocabulary.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Designed to be of special use to students of the biological sciences. Study of basic Greek and Latin elements of medical terminology through the analysis of select vocabularies and word lists. (F, Sp, Su)

CL C 2603. The Rise and Fall of Greece.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213/Expository Writing 1213. Traces the development of the democratic ideal in Greece through the classical period. Aspects of culture such as literature, religion, art and architecture, education, science and technology, intellectual life and the role of women are emphasized. (F) [IV-WC].

CL C 2613. The Rise and Fall of Rome.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213/Expository Writing 1213. Examines the development and dissemination of Roman civilization in ancient times and its influence on the modern world. Aspects of Roman culture such as literature, law, religion, art and architecture, education, intellectual life, popular entertainment, and the role of women are emphasized. (Sp) [IV-WC].

CL C 2970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics. 1 to 3 hours. May be repeated; Maximum credit nine hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research, and field projects. (Irreg.)

CL C 3033. Latin Literature in English Translation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: sophomore standing. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. readings in a selected genre (e.g. epic, drama, satire, lyric) with lectures on the history and development of latin literature. The Greek background to Latin literature and the Romans' influence on later works. [IV-WC].

CL C 3053. Origins of Christianity: Jesus to Augustine.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213. A survey of early Christian history that aims to set the Christian scriptures in their cultural and political context. Canonical, non-canonical, Jewish, and pagan sources are read alongside one another in order to consider the interrelationships among various religious ideas in the Roman world. (F) [IV-WC].

CL C 3103. States in Crisis in Greek and Roman Literature.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213/EXPO 1213; Course is not open to freshmen. The framers of the Constitution looked to ancient Athens, with its democracy, and Rome, with its republic, as models for a form of government that could withstand the vagaries of time. This course examines how those ancient governments fared during critical moments in their history. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

CL C 3113. Gods and Heroes of Ancient Epic.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213/Expository Writing 1213. The epic poetry of Homer, Hesiod, Vergil and other Greek and Roman writers in its literary and historical context. The epic tradition in later European literature. (F) [IV-WC].

CL C 3123. Ancient Drama in English Translation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor. Lectures on the development of the ancient Greek and Roman drama. Lectures with readings and discussion from the works of Aeschulus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plautus, Terence, and Seneca and from Aristole's poetics. The influence of ancient drama on European literature. (F) [IV-WC].

CL C 3133. Plato and the Platonic Tradition.3 Credit Hours.

A study of the major ideas in the central works of Plato and of their influence on the Neoplatonists. (Sp) [IV-WC].

CL C 3163. Visions of Heaven and Hell: Virgil, Dante, and Milton.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Focuses on Virgil's influence on Dante. Virgil celebrates, in both The Georgics and The Aeneid, the outcome of the struggle against external furor and passion and those elements within the individual. Dante, with Virgil as his spiritual guide in The Inferno, presents a series of spiritual exercises. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

CL C 3183. Hellas, the Civilization of Ancient Greece.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing and permission of instructor. Hellas examines the human factor dominating western history, philosophy, literature and political science as Greek civilization chronologically evolves. Responsible behavior, balance and control are the lessons of all Greek literature, art, philosophy and social institutions. (Sp) [IV-WC].

CL C 3213. Classical Art & Archaeology: Greek Art to the Death of Alexander.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Lectures, occasionally illustrated and assigned readings. Survey of the architecture, sculpture, painting and minor arts in the Greek regions of the Eastern Mediterranean in the successive stages of their development; with analyses of dominant styles and detailed study of select masterpieces and monuments. (F) [IV-AF].

CL C 3223. Classical Art & Archaeology: Hellenistic Greek Art; Roman Art.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with A HI 3223) Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Continuation of 3213. Survey of Hellenistic art with particular attention to the individuality of style and diversity of matter. Early Etruscan and Roman art. The development of Roman art in native and assimilated forms; studies in domestic and national monuments. (Sp) [IV-AF].

CL C 3233. The Roman Forum and its Monuments.3 Credit Hours.

Focus on the excavation of the Roman Forum, the central part of ancient Rome. concentrate study on archaeological methodology, specific excavations, topography of Rome, and the cultural significance of Roman urban development on the ancient world.

CL C 3283. Roma: The Civilization of Ancient Rome.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing and permission of instructor. This course surveys the Roman nation from its legendary origins in 753 BCE to the collapse of the Western Empire in 476 CE. Through readings from standard texts and historical fiction, students will learn about Roman history, literature and philosophy and its influence on the modern world. (Sp) [IV-WC].

CL C 3323. Religion of the Pharaohs.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. This course will examine the religious beliefs and practices of ancient Egyptians and the portrayal of ancient Egypt in popular culture. (F) [IV-WDC].

CL C 3403. Law and Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor. With Aristotle's politics as the principal guide, course follows development of justice throughout the Greco-Roman experience. (F) [IV-WC].

CL C 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

CL C 3510. Selected Topics in Classical Culture.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 Hours. May be repeated; maximum credit nine Hours. A study of selected topics in the civilizations and cultures of the Romans, Greeks and Hebrews. (F, Sp, Su)

CL C 3613. Classical Influence on Modern Literature.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 6 hours. Identifies the continuing importance of the classical tradition in modern literature. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC].

CL C 3803. The World of Late Antiquity: From Rome to Baghdad.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. This course introduces students to the historical period of Late Antiquity (circa 300 to 800 CE). The Mediterranean will be the center of attention, but Mesopotamia, Arabia, the Caucasus, the Balkans, and Western Europe will also be considered in turn, along with the rise and development of Christianity and the emergence of Islam as a permanent presence in the East. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

CL C 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 Hours. Prerequisite: admission to honors program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Consists of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

CL C 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 Hours. Prerequisite: admission to honors program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. The projects covered will vary. The content will deal with concepts not usually presented in regular coursework. (F, Sp)

CL C 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 Hours. Prerequisite: admission to honors program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

CL C 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and junior standing. May be repeated once with change of content. Independent study may be arranged to study a subject not available through regular course offerings. (F, Sp, Su)

CL C 4503. Classics Capstone.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: senior standing in major. Students review major facts, figures, and events of Greco-Roman antiquity and write a senior paper on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the instructor, using primary and secondary sources to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of one of the major areas of Greco-Roman civilization. (Sp) [V].

CL C 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

CL C 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

CL C 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

CL C 5990. Special Studies.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 Hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of classical civilization and culture. (F, Sp, Su)

GRK 1115. Beginning Greek.5 Credit Hours.

Introductory study of the vocabulary and grammar of the Greek language. Some practice in the reading of simple Attic prose; usually excerpts from Xenophon's Anabasis. (F, Sp, Su) [I-FL].

GRK 1215. Beginning Greek.5 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1115, or first year Greek in high school. Introductory study of the vocabulary and grammar of the Greek language. Some practice in the reading of simple Attic prose; usually excerpts from Xenophon's Anabasis. (Sp) [I-FL].

GRK 2113. Biblical Greek.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1215 or equivalent, with a grade of C of better. May be repeated with a change of content; maximum credit six hours. Reading designed mainly to increase the student's proficiency in rapid translation, in excerpts from the New Testament. (F)

GRK 2213. Homer.3 Credit Hours.

1215 or equivalent, with a grade of C or better. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Reading selections from Homer; designed to improve the student's proficiency in translation and the understanding of Greek poetic techniques. (Sp)

GRK 2970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics. 1 to 3 hours. May be repeated; Maximum credit nine hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research, and field projects. (Irreg.)

GRK 3113. Advanced Prose.3 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Readings in Plato: Crito and Apology; Lysias: Select Orations; Demosthenes: De Corona. (Sp)

GRK 3213. Ancient Greek Drama.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior sanding or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Extensive reading in representative tragedies and comedies of the Athenian dramatists. Supplementary studies in the development of the Greek theatre and its drama. (F)

GRK 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

GRK 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program and one intermediate Greek course. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Consists of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

GRK 3970. Honors Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2113 or 2213 or the equivalent . May be repeated with change of content; Maximum credit six hours. A study of selected topics in Greek literature on subjects not offered in regularly scheduled courses. (Irreg.)

GRK 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to the Honors Program and one intermediate Greek course. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

GRK 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

GRK 4133. Historians: Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3123, 3213, or 3313. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Introductory course in Greek history. Readings chosen to present memorable persons and episodes in the history of Ancient Greece. (Irreg.)

GRK 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

GRK 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

GRK 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

GRK 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

GRK 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

GRK 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

2 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Variable enrollment, two to nine hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, four hours.(F)

GRK 5990. Special Studies.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. May be repeated; maximum credit eight hours. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of Greek language and literature. (F, Sp)

LAT 1115. Beginning Latin.5 Credit Hours.

Introductory study of the vocabulary and grammar of the Latin language, with practice in the reading of sentences and connected prose from selected Latin authors. (F, Sp) [I-FL] .

LAT 1215. Beginning Latin.5 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1115, or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better. Introductory study of the vocabulary and grammar of the Latin language, with practice in the reading of sentences and connected prose from selected Latin authors. (F, Sp) [I-FL] .

LAT 1315. Intensive Introductory Latin.5 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of Honors Program. Alternative to the Latin 1115 and 1215 introductory sequence. Covers in one semester the essentials of the material in Latin 1115 and 1215. Students who have completed 1115 and 1215 may not enroll in 1315. (F) [I-FL] .

LAT 2113. Intermediate Latin Prose: Cicero, Livy, Pliny, Gellius, Vulgate.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1215, or equivalent, with a grade of C or better. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Readings in the companion textbooks to those in use in Latin 1115 and 1215, designed to ease the transition into reading the authentic prose of major Latin authors. (F, Sp, Su)

LAT 2213. Ovid.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1215, or equivalent, with a grade of C or better. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Reading selections from the works of Ovid; designed to improve the student's proficiency in translation and the understanding of the Latin Poetic technique. (F, Sp)

LAT 3113. Advanced Prose: Cicero, Pliny the Elder, Pliny the Younger.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2113 and 2213. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Readings from the works of Cicero or Pliny, representing the height of prose style in the Republican and Imperial periods, respectively. (Irreg.)

LAT 3213. Vergil.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2113 and 2213. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Selected readings from the works of Vergil, whose writings established the forms for all subsequent epic, didactic, and pastoral poetry in the west. (Irreg.)

LAT 3313. Latin Composition.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: one intermediate level Latin course or the equivalent. In this course the student will learn to compose in Latin by translating sentences and continuous passages from English. (Sp)

LAT 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

LAT 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Consists of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. Covers materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

LAT 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Provides an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp)

LAT 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

LAT 4133. Historians: Livy, Tacitus, Caesar, Sallust.3 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. Introductory course in Roman history. Readings chosen to present memorable persons and episodes in the ascendancy of the Republic, the critical issues of the Civil Wars, and the social and political decadence of the Early Empire. (Irreg.)

LAT G4213. Latin Lyric Poetry.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Readings in the works of Horace, Catullus, and the elegiac poets. Biographical and historical aspects of the poems. Supplementary studies in the development of lyric poetry and its various themes. (Irreg.)

LAT 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LAT 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LAT 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

LAT 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

LAT 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LAT 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

2 to 9 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Variable enrollment two to nine hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, four hours. (F, Sp, Su)

LAT 5990. Special Studies.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. May be repeated; maximum credit eight hours. Reading and research, arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of Classical philology. (F, Sp)

LTRS 1113. Introduction to Letters.3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to Letters major, OU's interdisciplinary humanities degree which provides a traditional liberal arts education. Modeled around a "Great-Books" approach that there is a canon of texts that has transcendent value because certain works are able to speak to the human condition across time and space. The curriculum is distinct through its insistence on combining history, philosophy, and literature as ways of asking the same fundamental questions through the record of actual human experience. A sequence of topics address perennial human concerns: reason and passion, love, death, work, God, freedom, time, and so on. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 2033. Introduction to Digital Humanities.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with HSCI and LIS 2033) This course introduces students to digital and/or computational methods in the humanities and addresses critical questions about the role of digital technology in society. This is a collaborative, hands-on, project-based course. (Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 2103. Introduction to Constitutional Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Provides a broad introduction to the theory and history of constitutional governance. Includes the classical roots of constitutional thought, the contribution of the English common law tradition, the origins and structure of the U.S. Constitution, along with a sense of the constitutional basis of contemporary political controversies. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 2970. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: none. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LTRS 3023. Classical Italy and Umbria.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 45 hours and permission of instructor; priority enrollment will be given to those students participating in the Perugia program. An introductory survey of the evolution of Italy from the pre-Roman Italic and non-Italic peoples and civilizations through the Roman era, papal rule, the Renaissance, Spanish and French domination, and ultimate unification into a modern country. Because of the tremendous influence of ancient Rome on Italy, more time will be spent on the Roman era than any other. Course consists of internet research on selected and chronological topics followed by essays and class discussion using internet technologies. (Su) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3113. The Examined Life I: Antiquity.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of Greece and Rome, with emphasis on understanding the impact of classical texts on modern day thought. Can be applied to the Letters major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3123. The Examined Life II: Middle Ages and Renaissance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with emphasis on the impact of these texts on modern thought. Can be applied toward the Letters major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (Sp) IV-WC].

LTRS 3133. Examined Life III: Enlightenment.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of The Enlightenment, with emphasis on understanding the impact of these texts on modern thought. Can be applied toward the Letters Major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3143. Examined Life IV: Modern Acad.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of 19th and 20th century thought, with emphasis on intellectual movements that have influenced the development of modern higher education. Can be applied toward the Letters major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3153. Challenging Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. This course examines historical figures who had a marked impact on the western world. Each unit introduces students to some of the problems faced by the society in which these influential individuals lived. Students explore how these seminal figures proposed solutions. (Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3203. Revenge Tragedy, Ancient and Modern.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Focuses on the revenge tragedy, a genre of entertainment that has enjoyed widespread popularity from its inception in Classical Antiquity up to the present day in commercial film. Investigates the origins of the revenge tragedy in Seneca's Medea, Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy, and Shakespeare's Hamlet, and explores the ways that modern horror, action, and mobster films adopt and adapt conventions from these seminal works. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3213. Shakespeare and Classical Mythology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Classical myth constitutes the single most important body of material that Shakespeare drew on in constructing his plays and poetry, and this course examines its significance to Shakespeare's writing. Whether used for comic, ironic, or tragic effect, Shakespeare's many allusions to Classical myth introduce us to words, images, and moral and aesthetic questions that significantly widen our perspective on his work. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3303. Origins of Rights in Early America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Explores the historical, rather than the philosophical, origins of ideas of individual and group rights in the European settlement of the New World. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3313. Secret Societies in American Culture.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Examines secret societies in American history, from the Revolution through the twentieth century, including the Freemasons, Odd Fellows, Ku Klux Klan, and collegiate secret societies that could claim the membership of millions. (F)

LTRS 3353. Interpreting the American Founding.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Examines the various ways that scholars have interpreted the Founding over the past two hundred years. It is a study, then, of the historiographic interpretations of the events of the American Founding era rather than a study of the events and historical figures themselves. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 3510. Topics in Letters.2-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Discussion of selected interdisciplinary topics in letters. (Irreg.)

LTRS 3603. Debating Constitutional Controversies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. This course transforms the classroom into a courtroom. Students become lawyers and judges, arguing and deciding cases that hinge on our most important Constitutional controversies. Working in teams, students grapple with these contentious issues in the context of the Constitution, the common law, and legal theory. (F, Sp)

LTRS 3613. Constitutional Narratives.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213/EXPO 1213. This course will explore the many ways that the art of narrative intersects with constitutional history. Students will fashion their own narratives about major constitutional episodes or figures of their choosing. (F)

LTRS 3703. Law and Social Movements.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines the history of the interaction between the law and social movements in the United States from the Civil War to the present day. Topics include the struggles for racial and gender equality and the histories of immigrant and gay rights movements. (F, Sp)

LTRS 3713. Gender and the Constitution.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines how ideas about gender, sexuality, and the family have shaped the privileges and obligations of American citizenship. Topics covered in this class include feminism, masculinity, women's suffrage, interracial marriage, affirmative action, and sexual orientation. In addition, it will examine how women have shaped the law as plaintiffs, lawyers, and judges. (F, Sp)

LTRS 3803. Fate & The Individual in European Literature I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Based on a course designed by W.H. Auden, this is part one of an intensive examination of classic texts of western literature, exploring questions of freedom, fate, and human responsibility. Texts introduce students to an ongoing conversation about what it means to be human. Begins in ancient Greece and ends in the seventeenth century. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3813. Fate & The Individual in European Literature II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Based on a course designed by W.H. Auden, this is part two of an intensive examination of classic texts of western literature, exploring questions of freedom, fate, and human responsibility. Texts introduce students to an ongoing conversation about what it means to be human. Texts cover the early modern period to the twentieth century. (Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Consists of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Subjects covered vary. Deals with concepts not usually treated in regular courses. (Irreg.)

LTRS 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and junior standing. May be repeated once with change of content. Independent study may be arranged to study a subject not available through regular course offerings. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 4103. Atlantic Revolutionaries.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines the ideas of revolution, citizenship, and freedom in the Atlantic World in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Students will examine revolutionary leaders including Simon Bolivar and Toussant L'Overture, and how ordinary people claimed for themselves ideas of equality and liberty in the Age of Revolution. (F, Sp)

LTRS 4303. Tocqueville's America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines the nation that Frenchmen Alexis de Tocqueville and Gustave de Beaumont encountered when they came to the United States--its society, literature, politics, and culture. Explores, in depth, the two towering literary productions of their expedition into America: Tocqueville's Democracy in America and Beaumont's groundbreaking antislavery novel, Marie. (F, Sp)

LTRS 4503. Letters Capstone Course.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: senior standing in major. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Students will write a senior paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Papers will demonstrate students' abilities to synthesize material drawn from among two or more of the areas included in the Letters program. (F, Sp) [V].

LTRS 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LTRS 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.2-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LTRS 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor or department. May be repeated; Maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. (F, Sp)

LTRS 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LTRS 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Reading and research arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of classical civilization and culture. (F, Sp, Su)

Faculty

Last Name First/Middle Name Middle init. OU Service start Title(s), date(s) appointed Degrees Earned, Schools, Dates Completed
Greene Ellen S 1991 JOSEPH PAXTON PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2003; PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2003; JOSEPH PAXTON PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2018 PhD, Univ of California Berkeley, 1991; MA, SUNY at Binghamton, 1976; BA, Rutgers Univ, 1972
Harper Kyle 2007 PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2014 PhD, Harvard Univ, 2007; MA, Harvard Univ, 2003; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 2001
Huskey Rebecca 2007 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2013 PhD, Univ of Iowa, 2005; BA, Univ of Oklahoma 1994
Huskey Samuel J 2002 JOSEPH PAXTON PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2007; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2008 PhD, Univ of Iowa, 2002; BA, Univ of Oklahoma, 1994
Johnson Scott 2015 ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2017; JOSEPH F. PAXTON PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 2018 PhD, Oxford Univ, 2005; MPhil, Oxford Univ, 2001; BA, Vanderbilt Univ, 1999
McClay Wildred 2013 G.T. & LIBBY BLANKENSHIP CHAIR; DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER FOR THE HISTORY OF LIBERTY; PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2013 PhD, Johns Hopkins University, 1987; BA, St. John's College, 1974
Porwancher Andrew R 2011 WICK CARY PROFESSOR IN THE INSTITUTE FOR THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL HERITAGE, 2011; ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2017 PhD, Univ of Cambridge, 2011; MA, Brown Univ, 2008; BA, Northwestern Univ, 2008
Russell Craig M 2015 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2015 PhD, Univ of California Los Angeles, 2013; MA, Uni of California Los Angeles, 2006; BA, Univ of Oregon, 2003
Schumaker Kathryn A 2013 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2014; EDITH KINNEY GAYLORD PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR OF EXCELLENCE, 2018 PhD, Univ of Chicago, 2013; MA, Univ of Chicago, 2008; BA, Northwestern Univ, 2005
Stanley Farland H 1985 BRIAN E. AND SANDRA O'BRIEN PRESIDENTIAL PROFESSOR, 1996; PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2003 PhD, Univ of Missouri, 1984; MA, Univ of Oklahoma 1976; BA, Univ of Oklahoma 1973
Watson Charles B 2014 ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CLASSICS AND LETTERS, 2014; ADJUNCT ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF INTERNAITONAL AND AREA STUDIES, 2018 PhD, Univ of Oxford, 2014; MSt, Univ of Oxford, 2004; AB, Harvard Univ, 2003