P SC-Political Science

P SC 1113. American Federal Government.3 Credit Hours.

Not accepted for major credit. A study of the structure, organization and powers of the executive, legislative and judicial branches including relationships between state and national governments. Emphasis upon political processes and popular government; elections, political parties, pressure groups, voting behavior. (F, Sp, Su) [III-PSC] .

P SC 2013. Introduction to Political Analysis.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Scientific method and the variety of approaches to a science of politics; problems of research design; methods and techniques of systematic political inquiry. (F)

P SC 2103. Politics in America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Focuses on the practice of politics in the United States and the forces and ideas that shape political conflict and determines who wins. The three major national institutions of American government are considered: Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary. Examines their constitutional bases of power, their evolving relationships, and their roles in contemporary policymaking. Also considers how ideas and power relationships influence the shape of political conflict. Contemporary political issues will be integrated into course content. (F)

P SC 2173. Administration and Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Studies relation of public administration to legislators, executives, and courts; and challenges to public management, such as diversity, equality, and justice. Topics include government budgeting, personnel, leadership, and organizing and delivering programs and services. Focuses on how to maintain ethics and accountability and increase efficiency and effectiveness in public programs. (F, Sp)

P SC 2223. Making Public Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Explores government actions to address social problems such as crime, poverty, health care, education, welfare reform, and the environment. Focuses on how to craft policy responses to conflict situations; resolve competing political demands for more services yet lower taxes; and achieve important societal goals of efficiency, equity, fairness, and freedom. (F)

P SC 2503. Global Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Introduces sources of continuity and change in world politics. Emphasis is given to the struggle for power and search for peace among state and non-state actors. Additional topics include the relevance of international law, foreign policy decision-making, balance of power, collective security, and moral choices in international politics. (F)

P SC 2603. Governments Around the World.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 2603) Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Gateway course in political science and international and area studies. Provides an introduction to the varieties of politics and governmental systems around the world. Students will develop skills in comparative analysis to understand why countries have distinct types of government. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC] .

P SC 2703. Justice, Liberty and the Good Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. An introduction to the literature about the best form of government, how a just and free society should be designed, and what difficulties stand in the way of our pursuit of the good society. Topics may include: the classic idea of a republic, theories shaping American democracy, the theory of equality and liberty, and contemporary ideas for the critical analysis and improvement of democracy. (F, Sp)

P SC 2970. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

Special Topics. 1 to 3 hours. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research, and field projects. (Irreg.)

P SC 3020. Problems in American Government and Politics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. Will not assume prior knowledge on the part of the students in reference to the topics under examination. The focus is on the national government, including the political processes and policies that relate to it. (F, Sp)

P SC 3023. Law and Courts.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of the instructor. This is an introduction to the judicial process, origin and sources of law, and the relationship between courts and other sectors of the American political system. It will focus on the criminal justice system, civil justice system, constitutional law, judicial selection, judicial policymaking, and how interest groups use the courts. (F)

P SC 3033. Religion and Politics in America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Examines the diverse religious traditions in America and explores their political manifestations. Assesses the religious impact on voting, lobbying, political mobilization and political culture. Particular attention will be paid to the strategic environment in which religious political actors must operate. [IV-WC] .

P SC 3043. Gender, Power and Leadership in Politics and Public Administration.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with WGS 3043) Prerequisite: 1113. Focuses on the relationship between gender, power, leadership, and government in politics and public administration. Causes of under-representation of women in elected office and the bureaucracy are explored. Historical, social, psychological, and organizational barriers are considered. (Irreg.)

P SC 3053. Global Religion and American Foreign Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. This course examines the intersection of American faith-based movements, global religious developments, and U.S. foreign policy. It explores how global religious conflicts impinge on American foreign policy, and how domestic religious groups attempt to shape U.S. policy on such concerns as human rights, humanitarian aid, and conflict mediation. (F, Sp)

P SC 3063. Religion and the American Constitution.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. This course examines the vital role of religion in the American Constitution, its antecedents and contemporary interpretations. (F)

P SC 3073. Immigration Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or permission of instructor. An examination of the politics of immigration in America. Includes lively debate, in addition to daily discussions of current events involving immigration. Emphasis will be placed upon the development of a unique research project that examines an important question, puzzle, or aspect of immigration in American politics. (Irreg.)

P SC 3083. The Politics of Criminal Justice.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. How does a political community best provide security to its members while also respecting the rights of all of its citizens? This course is an examination of the relationship between political variables and crime rates, police behavior, court dynamics and sentences, and prison practices and functions. (Irreg.)

P SC 3090. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Topics considered will deal with issues whose subject matter spans two or more subfields of the undergraduate curriculum in political science and/or public affairs and public administration. (Irreg.)

P SC 3093. Minority Political Behavior.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Examination of racial minority status in American politics. Addresses such broad topics as: racial and ethnic identity; political mobilization; statutory and legal intervention in the electoral process; the politics of immigration, acculturation, and identification; theories of minority representation; and what shapes political behavior among African-Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, and Native Americans. (Irreg.)

P SC 3113. Bureaucracy and Citizenship.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. Focuses upon various aspects of political life in bureaucratic society, including the scope of contemporary public programs and their impact on society, and extent and character of citizens' bureaucratic encounters, administrative pathology, bureaucratic helping, appeals of administrative decisions, bureaucratic accountability and democratic theory, and the future of citizen-bureaucratic relations. (Sp)

P SC 3123. Social Statistics.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with SOC 3123) Prerequisite: SOC 1113 and any General Education Math EXCEPT Philosophy 1113 or Philosophy 3113. Descriptive and inferential statistics as they are used in sociology to analyze survey and macro-level data. Problems of research design and interpretation of analysis in sociological theory are major topics. A grade of C or better in this course is a prerequisite for Sociology capstone courses. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 3133. Politics and Public Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 and sophomore standing. Examines the concept of the political role of the bureaucracy and the impact of other government institutions on bureaucratic structure, functions and behavior. The role of the bureaucracy in public policy making and the influence of politics on policy implementation is analyzed. (F) [III-SS] .

P SC 3143. U.S. Congress.3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the legislative process, with emphasis upon the United States Congress: the legislative process, committee systems; legislative leadership; the legislator and constituents; lobbyist and interest groups; legislative-executive relations. (Sp)

P SC 3163. The American Presidency.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Examination of the constitutional, electoral, administrative and political aspects of the contemporary American presidency; ending with an assessment of its capabilities in the context of its demands. (F)

P SC 3170. Problems in Public Administration.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: five hours of political science or three hours of another social science, or junior standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics and/or problems in the field of public administration not covered in the regular curriculum or by supervised individual study. The course will involve readings appropriate to the subject matter and requires completion of a substantial paper. Additional requirements will be covered by the instructor in the syllabus. (Irreg.)

P SC 3183. Politics of Government Budgeting.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2173. Provides an introduction to budgeting and the budgetary process in American government. Budgeting decision-making about government revenues and expenditures. (Sp)

P SC 3193. Nonprofits and Government.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with NPNG 3193) Prerequisite: NPNG 2033 and junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines nonprofit-government relationships in addressing societal problems. The nonprofit sector and government closely interact with each other in the realms of public policy and service delivery. Nonprofit roles in the domain of service delivery have intensified in recent years and thus triggered numerous research interests in academic and practical concerns for both government and nonprofit organizations. (Sp)

P SC 3203. Sexuality, Gender, and the Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or permission of the instructor. The course will examine a number of the most politically significant legal debates regarding gender and sexuality. Though the issues covered will vary by semester, they will include many of the following: discrimination on the basis of gender and sexual orientation, reproductive rights, the regulation of pornography, same-sex marriage, sexual harassment in the workplace, and the right to sexual privacy. (Irreg.)

P SC 3213. Law, Politics, and Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. Examines how courts and other political actors use law to solve problems and how judicial decisions incorporate legal and political considerations. It explores how law shapes or alters the political community, the extent that law changes to fit needs of society, and the role of politics in interpretation of law. (Sp)

P SC 3220. Topics in Public Policy.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 1113. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Research and investigation on selected topics in public policy. (Irreg.)

P SC 3233. Environmental Policy and Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Characterizes the evolution of public sector involvement in protection of the environment; addresses current issues associated in environmental protection including administrative efficiency and effectiveness and intergovernmental relations, and assesses potential solutions to emerging environmental problems. (F)

P SC 3253. Human Resource Management.3 Credit Hours.

Deals with the techniques, problems and processes of human resource management at the undergraduate level. Specific topics include: civil service reform, recruitment and training in the public sector and public sector EEO and labor problems. (Sp)

P SC 3263. Social Welfare.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Introduction to the basics of welfare policy in the United States. To do so, we will review the history of this policy area from early efforts in Western Europe up to the changes made by, and the impacts of, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996 which did away with the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program and ushered in TANF (Temporary Assistance to Needy Families). There will be a specific focus on the logic behind policy components (to include examining competing theories of human behavior and how they relate to relief efforts), their evolution, and the role of the political environment in fostering change. (Sp)

P SC 3273. Privatization.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or permission of instructor. Exposes students to competing theories regarding the privatization of publicly provided services (such as fire and police protection, road construction and maintenance, refuse collection, child protective services, and maintenance of public parks) with a particular focus on the supposed benefits and problems. (F)

P SC 3313. Urban Government and Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Structure and function of urban governments and analysis of politics in urban areas. (F)

P SC 3323. State Government.3 Credit Hours.

The organization, structure, functions, and administration of American state and local governments; federal-state relations; constitutions and legal systems; legislative, executive, and judicial departments; a study in the political process; problems of metropolitan areas; fiscal and administrative systems. (F)

P SC 3403. Interest Groups and Social Movements.3 Credit Hours.

Role of interest groups and collective action in the political process; theory of collective action and development of American pressure groups; group organization and internal behavior; patterns of external behavior; collective action and foreign political systems; and organized interests and democratic government. (F)

P SC 3413. American Political Parties.3 Credit Hours.

A descriptive and critical examination of the political processes in the United States, with special reference to the role and organization of political parties and their relationship to voter behavior and the popular control of government. (Irreg.)

P SC 3423. Public Opinion.3 Credit Hours.

Relies on three basic themes as a framework for the study of public opinion: coalitions, elites and masses. More specific subjects studied include political socialization, the parties and the media. Students may not take both P SC 3423 and P SC 4013 for credit. (Irreg.)

P SC 3433. Voters and Campaigns.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Covers some of the literature on voting behavior and political campaigns: political socialization; political participation; election studies; influence on voting such as party, candidate, issues, and group affiliations; the legal framework and impact of reform; election outcomes and their policy import. Coverage of the campaign process includes party and interest group activity, campaign financing, strategy, the media, and campaign reform. (Irreg.)

P SC 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 3443. Mass Media and American Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Role of mass media in American politics including origin and development of relationship between press and politics, how the press covers politics, effects of mass media on public opinion, political elites, and institutions. (Irreg.)

P SC 3453. Southern Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 and junior standing, or permission of instructor. Focuses on the history and evolution of southern politics and the role of race, religion, and political culture as these factors impact and give the region its distinctive political features. These factors, plus the realignment of the political parties in these states, contribute to southern political strength in Congress, which in turn impacts national politics as a whole. The course will examine all of these factors both in terms of institutional structures and behavioral values. (Sp) [III-SS] .

P SC 3463. American Political Development.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. Analyzes the institutional development of American politics. The premise is that institutions are created to solve conflicts at specific historical junctures. Once in place, these institutions create opportunities and constraints for future generations. Focus on explaining large-scale political change in the United States from the founding to the present. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

P SC 3473. Political Psychology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or permission of instructor. An overview of political psychology, where students will engage in debates about the relative power of the situation vs. the individual, whether human beings are truly rational actors, the extent to which human beings exercise free will, and whether morality is achievable. Specifically, delves into the following questions:1) Why do people engage in hostile, aggressive, and "evil" behavior; 2) Why is there intergroup conflict; 3) Why does the media have such a powerful impact on political attitudes; 4) What drives political ideology, partisan affiliation, and voting behavior; and 5) What explains the behavior of political elites? (Irreg.)

P SC 3483. Campaign Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: departmental permission and P SC 1113. Addresses practical aspects of campaign management including information about the decisions campaign managers make in gathering information, raising money, harnessing technology, honing and disseminating messages, and targeting volunteers/voters in the context of aiding a candidate in running for/winning office. Explores practical lessons on campaign management and provides hands-on training through the use of existing electoral databases and on-campus resources. (Irreg.)

P SC 3493. Congress: Politics, Policy and the Constitution.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P Sc 1113. Introduces students to theory and research on the role of the Congress under the U.S. Constitution and the relationship of the Congress to the coordinate branches of the federal government, as well as to the state governments in interpreting and applying the Constitution. Experience in original archival research on the politics, policies and constitutional struggles of the Congress through the Carl Albert Congressional Research & Studies Center will be gained. (Irreg.)

P SC 3513. Causes of War.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. This course will examine causes and consequences of war, looking at the changing nature of war, international relations theories about causes of war, and case studies, primarily from the 20th century. (Irreg.)

P SC 3523. The History of Terrorism.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Surveys terrorism from its first use during the Roman Empire through the French Revolution and up to its modern form. Includes a focus on several important groups such as the Irish Republican Army and the Ku Klux Klan, as well as how terrorist goals move in historical cycles. (Irreg.)

P SC 3533. Contemporary Terrorism.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Designed to help students develop a better understanding of the nature of terrorism, the variety of terrorist motivations, the means by which governments attempt to deal with the problem, and the variety of research questions that remain unanswered. (Irreg.)

P SC 3543. United States-Latin American Relations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. This course studies both the historical development and current problems of conflict and cooperation between the United States and the countries of Latin America, and the ways their interactions affect each country's security, politics, economy, society, and culture. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

P SC 3550. Topics in International Relations.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Systematically explores contemporary problem areas in international relations. Will not assume prior knowledge on the part of the students in reference to the topics under examination. Meets in a seminar format where emphasis will be placed on classroom presentations and extensive research papers. (Irreg.)

P SC 3553. International Political Economy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Focus on patterns, processes, and problems of international trade, monetary, technological, and investment relations. Deals with the roles played by key international organizations in managing conflict and cooperation among states. Students learn to apply theoretical approaches in analyzing issues in the global economy. (F) [IV-WC] .

P SC 3563. United States Diplomatic History.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: none. A survey of American diplomatic history from the War for Independence to the present, emphasizing relations with major European, Latin American and Far Eastern countries. [IV-WC] .

P SC 3573. Great Power Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Explores the meaning of power in politics and diplomacy, relations among great powers in different historical settings, arguments for and against realism as a theory of international politics, different strategies for projecting power, whether moral choices are relevant in the realm of power politics, and the importance of geopolitics in the 21st century map of world affairs. (Irreg.)

P SC 3583. Masters & Commanders: Wartime Strategy and Statecraft.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Based on Andrew Roberts' Masters And Commanders: How Roosevelt, Churchill, Marshall and Alanbrooke Won the War in the West. Focuses on debates between the four principals and senior Allied officials in shaping the grand strategy of the West during the Second World War. Attention is devoted to disagreements about military necessities and about the structure of the postwar world. (Sp)

P SC 3593. Nongovernmental Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with NPNG 3593) Prerequisite: P SC 1113 and junior standing or permission of instructor. Provides an understanding of the political role of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in global as well as local politics. Introduces practical knowledge about the activities of NGOs in various policy fields. Provides information about transnational advocacy, nongovernmental networks, agenda setting, civil society mobilization, and contentious politics. (Irreg.)

P SC 3600. Topics in Comparative Politics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Will examine contemporary issues in politics and government around the world. Meets in a seminar format where emphasis will be placed on classroom presentations and research. (Irreg.)

P SC 3603. Politics of Ireland and the United Kingdom.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Introduction to the politics of the Republic of Ireland and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Political, social, and institutional development of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales; the Irish struggle for independence and civil war; and the creation of national identities. Studies contemporary political institutions and party systems. (Irreg.)

P SC 3633. Politics in East Asia.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. This course provides a survey of politics and political systems in select countries in east Asia and aims at developing comprehensive understanding of contemporary Asian politics. We will identify similarities and differences in the politics of these countries in specific dimensions and explore the basis of each of them. (F) [IV-NW] .

P SC 3643. Democracies and Democratization: A Comparative Inquiry.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113. Studies the theory, history, causes, and prospects for democracy in the world, beginning with ancient Greece and ending with the challenges of democracy and democratization in countries around the world today. Although primarily a social science course, questions about the philosophical underpinnings of democracy are also raised. (Sp) [IV-WC].

P SC 3653. Government and Politics of Latin America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. General survey of structure, organization and operation of Latin American governments. Problems of dictatorship, underdevelopment, social reform and relations with the United States are covered. (F) [IV-WC] .

P SC 3663. Politics of the Middle East.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. This course surveys the developments in current domestic politics in Middle Eastern countries. It will focus on the process of state building, great power politics, Islam and political ideologies, economic crises, and regime stability and change. (Irreg.)

P SC 3683. The Politics of Russia.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: five hours of political science, or 1113 and three hours of another social science, or junior standing and permission. Introduction to domestic politics in the Russian Federation. An overview of Russian and Soviet history, focusing on recurrent dilemmas of Russian political life. Special emphasis will be on Gorbachev's reforms, the collapse of communism, the emergence of post-Soviet politics, and the future of Russian democracy, economic institutions and inter-ethnic relations. (F) [IV-WC] .

P SC 3693. Ethnicity, Energy, & Elections in Eurasia.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or permission of instructor. Focuses on the political phenomena that spill across borders in Eurasia. Ethnicity matters in terms of the structure of nationalist movements that ended the Soviet system and the legacies of ethnic conflicts that keep states and societies deeply divided will be studied. Energy is the dominant resource in Eurasia and the struggle to control the flow of energy across borders coincides with the revival of the "Great Game" and Russia's attempt to restore hegemony in the region. All the states of Eurasia hold regular elections as a matter of course, though rarely are they free and fair elections. While autocrats share "political technologies" to legitimate dictatorship, elections also are sites of mass mobilization that bear the potential for revolution and a second chance at democracy. Each of the major themes straddle the division between comparative politics and international relations: ethnic conflict relates to civil war as well as inter-state conflict; energy relates to domestic as well as international political economy; and elections relate to the sharing or emulation of authoritarian practices and the diffusion of regime change. (Sp)

P SC 3703. From Plato to Machiavelli, the Classic Art of Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 and sophomore standing. Study of the origins of political science or political philosophy in the thought of classical antiquity and of the continuing influence of the classic works. Topics may include: Plato and Aristotle's attempt at a systematic political science; Thucydides on democracy and war; the interaction of religion and politics; and the early modern rebirth of the classical republican era. (F) [IV-WC] .

P SC 3713. The Idea of a Liberal Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 and sophomore standing. Study of the major works of modern political thought that inspired the idea of a rights-oriented liberal society. Readings vary, but may include Thomas Hobbes and John Locke, their followers and critics in later centuries (such as Montesquieu, Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, and Mill), and those who later subjected the liberal idea to fundamental criticism (Marx, Nietzsche, and others). (Sp) [IV-WC] .

P SC 3723. Foundations of American Politics.3 Credit Hours.

An examination of the principal issues and ideas of the American colonial, revolutionary and founding periods and their influence on, and relevance to contemporary American politics.

P SC 3743. Problems in Political Theory.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of the instructor May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Special topics in political theory, including concepts such as power, liberty, justice, equality, democracy, etc., or particular theorists or schools of thought. (Irreg.)

P SC 3753. Human Rights and Contentious Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Students gain an understanding of the major players influencing human rights, their interests, the arenas in which they interact, and the rules that govern their interactions. The focus of the class is not on philosophical underpinnings of rights, but rather on how repression and efforts to combat it play out in the domestic and international arena. (Irreg.)

P SC 3761. Event Planning.1 Credit Hour.

(Crosslisted with NPNG 3761) Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or junior standing. Covers the basic techniques and processes behind event planning and management. Provides students with the opportunity to pitch event ideas to the class. Event management and planning will delve deeper into the process that surround events: budgeting, venue choices, fundraising, etc. (Irreg.)

P SC 3763. Field Research Methods and Community Engagement: The Oklahoma City Exit Poll.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Trains students as field researchers for an election exit poll. In addition to learning how to design relevant and valid questionnaire items, students will participate as survey enumerators on the day of the election. As part of the course students will receive CITI certification demonstrating their expertise as researchers. (Irreg.)

P SC 3771. Issue Advocacy.1 Credit Hour.

(Crosslisted with NPNG 3771) Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or junior standing. Designed to provide a practical application of the theories and concepts students acquire in the study of political science and public administration. Students will learn to be effective advocates at all levels of government for the issues and ideas they seek to see implemented in public policy. (Irreg.)

P SC 3781. Tracking Legislation.1 Credit Hour.

(Crosslisted with NPNG 3781) Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or junior standing. Designed to provide a practical application of the theories and concepts acquired in the study of political science and public administration. How to read and track legislation in the State of Oklahoma will be learned. Additionally, students will learn the inner workings of state government from a legislative perspective. (Irreg.)

P SC 3791. Social Media Strategies for Public and Nonprofit Organizations.1 Credit Hour.

(Crosslisted with NPNG 3791) Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or junior standing. This course is designed to offer an overview of the social media field as it pertains to nonprofits and public organizations.

P SC 3910. Government Internship.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: good academic standing with 45 semester hours completed, including nine hours of political science; permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Interns observe and participate in the functions, processes and actions of governmental institutions at the federal, state and local level. Grade of S/U based on completion of directed readings, an academic research paper, performance reports. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will consist of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated: maximum credit six hours. The projects covered will vary. The content will deal with concepts not usually presented in regular coursework. (F, Sp)

P SC 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general area to be studied; junior standing; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Through a written contract, independent study may be arranged for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 4020. Problems in American Government.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Focus on the national government, including the political processes and policies that relate to it. (Irreg.)

P SC 4023. Community Scholars.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Service-learning course allows students to become participants in community activities and organizations designed to address community needs. At the same time, students develop skills and abilities for critical thinking, group problem-solving, and effective civic engagement. Combines community service and academic learning to examine how local government agencies work along side community organizations, mainly nonprofit organizations, to meet the needs of their community. (F)

P SC 4033. Capitol Scholars: A Service Learning Course.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 and permission of instructor. The course uses service-learning and weekly seminars to focus on institutions, policy-making and politics in legislative settings. (Sp)

P SC 4043. Public Policy Implementation.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5043) Prerequisite: 2223. This course examines how public laws are implemented. It investigates actors, institutions and processes influential in decisions and actions regarding public program delivery. No student may earn credit for both 4043 and 5043. (Irreg.)

P SC 4083. Strategies in Politics and Public Policy.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with P SC 5083) Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Politics involves the interaction of people who seek to use mechanisms of collective choice to further their goals. This undergraduate course focuses on how political institutions translate the preferences of individuals into social choices. What strategies can individuals employ to influence social choices? This class addresses these questions through theories of individual decision making, social choice, and collective action. No student may earn credit for both 4083 and 5083. (Irreg.)

P SC 4093. Capstone Seminar in Political Science.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: senior standing, completion of four of the following courses: 2103, 2173, 2223, 2503, 2603, 2703; and permission of department. Capstone seminar for major in political science. Explore topics in political science for students with substantial background in the discipline and includes a significant writing component. Specific subtitles will vary. (F, Sp) [V] .

P SC G4113. American Foreign Policy from World War II to the Present.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. An analysis of American foreign policy in the twentieth century. Covers the emergence of the United States as a great power, abandonment of isolation, World War II and the development of internationalism, the Cold War and policies of containment, the American involvement in the Far East, Middle East and Latin America. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

P SC 4143. Policy/Program Evaluation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 2223. Introduces the planning and implementation of a variety of evaluation types and methods. Considers the utilization of findings in a political environment. (Irreg.)

P SC 4153. Strategic Planning and Performance Assessment.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 and junior standing or permission of instructor. Introduces strategic planning, performance assessment and benchmarking. Familiarizes students with these three strategic management processes and illustrates development, implementation, and reformulation of public policy and operational strategy. Emphasis is placed on the need for awareness of, and accommodation to, changes in an organization's environment. (Irreg.)

P SC 4193. The Profession of Public Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. Open to undergraduate students only. Focuses on the internal administrative processes of public agencies, concentrating on the generic management functions of planning, directing and controlling as they relate to the development and implementation of public policy programs. (Irreg.)

P SC 4203. Capstone Seminar in Public Affairs and Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: senior standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated once with change of content. The focus and subtitle will vary. Develops the ability to analyze and interpret the subject matter; contains a substantial writing component. (F, Sp) [V] .

P SC 4213. Regulatory Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Examines the topic of administration and the agencies that are responsible for these government activities. Emphasizes the constitutional, legal, administrative, and political issues raised by the growth and nature of regulatory activities. (F)

P SC 4220. Problems in Public Policy.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Research and investigation on selected problems in the field of public policy. (Irreg.)

P SC 4243. Grants and Contracts.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with NPNG 4243) Prerequisite: P SC 1113 and junior standing or permission of instructor. Provides the necessary background to apply project management and development skills to the process of writing grant and contract proposals for public affairs organizations. Topics will include: needs assessment, searching for funding, budget development, and project evaluation. (Irreg.)

P SC 4263. American Constitutional Law I: Governance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Chronological exploration of the role of constitutional principles and the United States Supreme Court in the historical and contemporary political struggles concerning the structure, distribution, and uses of national governmental power in the American polity. Examines the Constitution's allocation of powers vertically between the national government and the states, and horizontally among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches; the changing understandings of the relationship between the economic powers of private individuals and the national government; the powers of the national government over non-citizens; and the Constitution's allocation of war-making powers. (F)

P SC G4273. Constitutional Interpretation.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1113 or permission of instructor. Asks basic questions about the nation's fundamental law: What is the Constitution? Who is authorized to interpret it? How might one authoritatively interpret it? Why should anyone try to interpret it? (F) [IV-WC] .

P SC G4283. American Constitutional Law II: Civil Rights and Civil Liberties.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or permission of instructor. Investigates the character, function, and enforcement of civil rights and civil liberties in the American constitutional system. (Sp) [IV-WC] .

P SC 4323. Political Communication.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with COMM 4323) Prerequisite: COMM 1113 or P SC 1113 and junior standing or permission of instructor. This course considers the role of communication in democracy. Topics include the kinds of information necessary to sustain democratic systems, the ways in which citizens are informed about public affairs, the function of news media in democratic systems, and how citizens, media and political leaders interact. (F, Sp)

P SC 4523. International Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 or permission of instructor. Focuses on the organization of international politics via formal multilateral arrangements (international organizations) and informal multilateral agreements (international regimes). (F)

P SC 4713. Princes, Tyrants, Statesmen: On Political Leaders.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Examines important works that aim either to instruct major political leaders or to evaluate them for the purpose of political understanding. The studies range over a number of cases, classical, modern, and contemporary, of very different kinds and quality. Cases discussed may represent a high degree of excellence in leadership, or the worst examples of tyranny. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

P SC 4833. Intelligence Collection, Covert Action, and Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. An examination of present-day covert action as well as a comparison of the original concepts of covert action with current political polices and practices. A key question addressed is if covert action has a future in modern politics. Finally, this course examines intelligence requirements and production and what happens when political influence distorts or misdirects the intelligence process. (Irreg.)

P SC 4843. Foreign Intelligence Services.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Applies the comparative political science method to intelligence policy and intelligence organization. Primary focus is on English-speaking intelligence community in comparison to other intelligence communities. Key topics include organization and management of intelligence services; objects or targets of intelligence activities; and the challenges of cooperation between US and foreign intelligence agencies. (Irreg.)

P SC 4853. Ethics and Intelligence.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Examines the fundamental question of "Is spying ethical?" Since antiquity, virtually all major powers have maintained intelligence services for the basic purpose of ensuring their security and existence. Key topics include: intelligence and personal ethics versus rules-based ethics; professional ethics in intelligence; ethical dilemmas; domestic intelligence collection and civil liberties; interrogation; intelligence analysis and ethics; and politicization of intelligence. (Irreg.)

P SC 4863. Strategic Intelligence Challenges.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Studies problem identification in international politics and how 'politics problems' become 'intelligence problems'. Identifies historic and emerging theories of intelligence collection and use; adapting intelligence collection to changing problems; the evolution of intelligence tools and personnel training. Topical content such as WMD proliferation, terrorism, illicit trafficking, and electronic surveillance are used as subject matter vehicles. (Irreg.)

P SC 4873. Tools of Statecraft.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Provides an introduction to the range of tools of statecraft, other than war, and examines the role of intelligence as a foreign policy tool. Offers a broad overview of the functional areas of intelligence (collection, analysis, counterintelligence, overt political action and covert activities); the organizational makeup of the US Intelligence Community; laws, guidelines and ethics pertaining to intelligence collection; and explores real world examples of how tools of statecraft are employed in the conduct of foreign policy in the modern world. (Irreg.)

P SC 4883. Intelligence Analytics I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113. Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of effective intelligence writing and presentation. Emphasis is placed on critical thinking, writing and oral communication skills for intelligence analysis. Topics include structuring analytical problems; sources of intelligence information; and using analytical software for writing exercises with oral presentations. (Irreg.)

P SC 4893. Intelligence Analytics II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 1113 and P SC 4883. Develops advanced critical thinking, writing and oral communication skills by enhancing ability to apply methods for intelligence analysis. Emphasis is placed on assessing bias in information sources, critiquing analytical products, and applying analytical software to major writing exercises with oral presentations. (Irreg.)

P SC 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

P SC 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

P SC 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; senior standing; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Through a written contract, independent study may be arranged for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 5003. Introduction to Public Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. An introductory graduate seminar surveying the field of public administration and its role and position in contemporary government, providing a basis from which to undertake advanced studies of theoretical and substantive nature. Attention will be given to key themes in past and present of mainstream public administration, such as the foundation, personnel, organization, and policies of government. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 5013. History and Theory of Urban Planning.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with RCPL 5013) Prerequisite: open to seniors in social science departments, civil engineering and architecture, and to graduate students in regional and city planning. An introductory course on the history and theory of contemporary planning, focusing on the physical, social, institutional and economic structure and dynamics of human settlements, and on the role and responsibilities of the professional planner. (F)

P SC 5023. Problems in American Government.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 12 hours in political science or senior standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Content varies with instructor. The focus is on the national government, including the political process and policies that relate to it. (Irreg.)

P SC 5033. Foundations of Nonprofit Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Introduces broad theories and managerial practices in the field of nonprofit management. The main foci of the course are to provide theoretical foundations of the nonprofit sector by examining its nature, scope, legal frameworks, functions, and policy implications and to examine various managerial challenges nonprofit organizations face due to their unique sector positions and how they respond to those challenges. Challenges are multifaceted (leadership, financial, personnel, performance evaluation and accountability, governmental relations) and the course will provide several case studies for students to review and seek potential solutions in individual as well as group settings. (Irreg.)

P SC 5043. Public Policy Implementation.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4043) Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course examines how public laws are implemented. It investigates actors, institutions and processes influential in decisions and actions regarding public program delivery. No student may earn credit for both 4043 and 5043. (Irreg.)

P SC 5053. Agenda-Setting in Public Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. This class will focus on agenda-setting and policy change - that is, how policy agendas are determined and their impact on policy change. In so doing, we will examine the role that various actors play (including public administrators), the impact of focusing events, political institutions, and the media. (Irreg.)

P SC 5063. Nonprofits and the Public Sector Relations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Explores various issues that arise from collaborative efforts between the nonprofit and government sectors in delivering public services. Includes an examination of a nonprofit-public sector collaboration and partnership, especially the nature of nonprofit-public sector strategic alliances, the dynamics of service delivery networks, and the effectiveness of collaborations. The role of nonprofits and the policy implications in social service contracting are examined. (Irreg.)

P SC 5073. Municipal Management and Leadership.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Streets, water, sewer, trash, public safety, and business all center on Main Street U.S.A., and cities are literally where politics and policy directly meet citizens in their everyday lives. The management of urban areas involves a wide array of public administration skills and topics. Topics include: infrastructure, municipal finance, economic development, human resource management, and basic service delivery. Students will hone the skills of political analysis, project planning and strategic management. (Irreg.)

P SC 5083. Strategies in Politics and Public Policy.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with P SC 4083) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Politics involves the interaction of people who seek to use mechanisms of collective choice to further their goals. This course focuses on how political institutions translate the preferences of individuals into social choices. What strategies can individuals employ to influence social choices? The class addresses these strategies through theories of individual decision making, social choice, and collective action. No student may earn credit for both 4083 and 5083. (Irreg.)

P SC 5093. Grants and Contracts.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course discusses how to write a strong grant or contract proposal along with strategies for successful implementation of the resulting project. The focus will be on project development and project management for public and nonprofit sectors. (Irreg.)

P SC 5103. Organizations: Design, Structure and Process.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: full graduate standing or permission of instructor. Analyzes large, complex organizations, particularly governmental units and other public sector agencies. Attention will be given to the principal theoretical models for their design and structure. Also seeks to understand system-subsystem relationships in the processes of decision making, communication, influence, leadership and technology. (F)

P SC 5113. Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations.3 Credit Hours.

Covers the origins, development, and operational aspects of federalism in the U.S. Intergovernmental relations as the dynamics of federalism are studied as they impact on decision-making, administrative and fiscal patterns. Decentralization and reorganization are analyzed as they affect the administration of national programs. (Sp)

P SC 5123. The Making of American Foreign Policy.3 Credit Hours.

A study of American policy formulation with its problems and limitations. Current American foreign policies and alternate courses of action are examined critically. (Irreg.)

P SC 5133. Strategic Planning and Performance Measurement.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Introduces students to strategic planning, performance measurement, and benchmarking in the public sector. Provides an overview of strategic management and illustrates the development, implementation and reformulation of public policy and operational strategy. Emphasis on the changes in an organization's environment. (Irreg.)

P SC 5143. Program Evaluation and Applied Policy Analysis.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Methodology of planning and evaluating government policies and programs. Emphasizes research design, economic analysis of public policies and programs, and methods for handling threats to validity of research results. (F)

P SC 5170. Problems in Public Administration.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Research and investigation on selected problems of public administration. Some alternative subjects; administrative theory and organizational theory; bureaucracy; organization and management; government corporations; administrative policy making; responsibility and accountability. (Irreg.)

P SC 5173. Bureaucracy and Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Examines the concept of the political role of the bureaucracy and the impact of other government institutions on bureaucratic structure, functions and behavior. The role of the bureaucracy in public policy making and the influence of politics on policy implementation are analyzed. (Sp)

P SC 5183. Public Budgeting and Finance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Examines the techniques and politics of raising and spending public funds. Discusses topics such as deficit politics, legislative and executive powers, and the budgetary role of the courts. Assesses the impacts of taxing and spending policies. Explores issues relevant to national, state, and local governments. (Sp)

P SC 5193. Comparative Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Will compare analytically the political, legal, economic and cultural influences. Similarities and contrasts in the bureaucratic functions and structures will be examined and attention given to organization around the chief executive, both centrally and in departments and ministries. (Irreg.)

P SC 5213. Risk, Public Policy, and Law.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. This seminar will focus on how concepts of risk serve to justify and shape public policies, legal rules, and risk management practices. It will introduce some of the primary methods for analyzing potentially risky policies and managing risk. We will begin with a focus on the definition of risk as it applies to public policy, and as it has been used to analyze and inform policies and laws designed to address risks. We will then turn to the differences between formal assessments of risk and the "perceived risks" and social, political and institutional responses that typically drive public policy. These concepts will then be applied to a set of specific cases in current public policies that involve the intersection of environmental, energy, natural disaster, and security concerns. (Irreg.)

P SC 5233. Health Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course is designed to provide students with a clear understanding of the nature and dynamics of health policy making and administration in the United States. (Irreg.)

P SC 5243. Managing Public Programs.3 Credit Hours.

Introduces MPA students to the general principles of management as they are applied in the public sector. Topics include: systems theory, systems design (PERT), organization design, techniques of supervision, public sector labor relations, public sector personnel practices, agency interface with political actors in the environment. (Irreg.)

P SC 5253. Human Resource Administration.3 Credit Hours.

An analysis of the structure and role of manpower in all levels of U.S. government, focusing on the development of the public service, manpower planning, unionization of public employees and recent trends in public personnel relations. (Sp)

P SC 5263. Congress in the Political System.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Empirically based course considering United States Congress and its role in American political system; examination of relationships between Congress and other institutions and actors. Possible topics include: Congress and the Presidency, interest groups, and lobbyists; Congress and Supreme Court; Congress and foreign policy; Congress and executive bureaus. (F)

P SC 5283. Problems in Law and the Constitution.3 Credit Hours.

Content varies. Intensive analysis of specific problems in legal or constitutional theory. Topics could include: Slavery and the constitution, capitalism and constitutional order, constitutional crisis and failure, law and morality, jurisprudence. (Irreg.)

P SC 5293. Administration, Ethics and American Government.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. An exploration of the role of ethics in American government, especially in public administration. Topics to be studied include codes of professional ethics for administrators, ethics and constitutionalism, law and ethics, and the ethical implications of differing approaches to administrative work and to democracy. (Irreg.)

P SC 5313. Urban Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Examine differing theories as to how urban governance, administration,and politics actually operate. Included in this examination are a variety of major issues related to urban governance and administration including intergovernmental relations, urban service delivery, fragmentation of urban areas between cities and suburbs, the rise of sunbelt cities, urban sprawl, racism, poverty, crime, and national urban policy. We will also examine broader visions and proposals to revitalize and enhance urban living. Finally, we will consider the current state of urban politics and where it might go in the future. (Irreg.)

P SC 5323. Problems in Public Policy.3 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Content varies with professor. Focus on topics related to public policy issues at all levels of government, including the design, implementation, and evaluation of specific policy initiatives. (Irreg.)

P SC 5333. Environmental Policy and Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. United States environmental policy, environmental movements, policy process, cost-benefit analysis, risk analysis and management, clean air policy, hazardous waste policy, other topical policy areas, global environmental issues. (Irreg.)

P SC 5343. Public Policy and Inequality.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Explores alternative definitions of equality and their implications in terms of public policy. Specific topics include the role of issue definition and agenda-setting in policy formation, the causes and politics of inequality, the difficulties in measuring inequality, and institutional dynamics that exacerbate or ameliorate inequality. (F)

P SC 5353. State and Local Public Finance and Budgeting Systems.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with RCPL 5353) Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission. An overview of the process and methods for local capital improvement programs and capital budget preparation, and an examination of the relationships between local development policies and fiscal decision making, including revenue potential. (CE)

P SC 5363. Public Financial Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Introduces students to important concepts, procedures, and skills associated with managing public monies. Major topics include government accounting, debt management, forecasting, cash management, and capital budgeting. (Irreg.)

P SC 5373. Education Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course is designed to give students an overview of the major policy issues in primary, secondary, and higher education. Special attention will be given to how these issues relate to prominent theories of the policy process. (Irreg.)

P SC 5383. Survey of Political Communication.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with COMM 5383) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Embraces the premise that meaningful democracy requires an effective political communication system. Examines some of the tensions between the requirements of democracy and the forms of communication that have emerged to meet them, exploring the roles of political leaders, citizens, and the mass media in the evolution of a democratic political information system. (Irreg.)

P SC 5393. Regulatory Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Examines the reasons for the growth of administration regulation, regulatory agencies and processes, the nature of their formal, legal and informal powers, organization and procedures, and of their relationships with legislature, chief executives, courts, and interest groups, including consumer interests. (Irreg.)

P SC 5400. Problems in Political Behavior.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, qualified senior by permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Content varies, representative topics would include interdisciplinary contributions to the study of political behavior, political socialization, decision making, voting behavior, belief systems, political violence, personality and politics and political culture. (Irreg.)

P SC 5423. Mass Politics: Public Opinion, Voting, Realignment.3 Credit Hours.

A survey of the literature on public opinion, voting behavior and realignment (or electoral change). Additional topics may include political socialization, participation and elite-mass interactions. (Irreg.)

P SC 5453. The Presidency.3 Credit Hours.

Will survey recent literature on the institution of the American presidency and examine behavior of recent presidents. A research paper is required. (Irreg.)

P SC 5513. International Relations Theory.3 Credit Hours.

Overview and appraisal of the state of the field of international relations. Primary emphasis will be placed on scope and method issues and on a review of theoretical attempts to explain general and specific aspects of international relations. (Irreg.)

P SC 5523. Morality and Foreign Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Addresses the moral and ethical foundations of foreign policy. Emphasis will be on American foreign policy, but may also include broader issues of foreign policy and international relations. Sample issues may include national interest versus conceptions of justice as foundations for foreign policy, idealism and realism in the American foreign policy tradition, ethical issues in international relations, globalization, genocide, just war theory, etc. Readings may be taken from political theory, American foreign policy, and international relations. (Irreg.)

P SC 5543. International Law and Organizations.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Focuses on the organization of international politics via formal multilateral arrangements (international organizations) and informal multilateral agreements (international regimes) from a theoretical perspective. (F)

P SC 5550. Problems in International Relations.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Analysis of current international conflicts and problems with study of possible solutions. May include study of the role and current problems of the United Nations. (Irreg.)

P SC 5553. International Security.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course examines major theoretical approaches to the study of international security, including traditional approaches, the role of weapons, and new dimensions in internal security. (F)

P SC 5563. International Political Economy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. The organization of the international economic system and the opportunities and constraints faced by national governments in managing economic relations with other countries. Also examines the role of international agencies in managing economic crises and the globalization of the world economy. (Irreg.)

P SC 5583. Gender and Global Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Provides a comprehensive survey of various approaches to understanding and analyzing how gender matters in global politics and international relations. Specifically, the course focuses on the gendered impact of neoliberal institutions and practices, migration and feminization of labor, and perspectives on human trafficking and sex trafficking. (Irreg.)

P SC 5600. Problems in Comparative Government.2-3 Credit Hours.

2 to 3 hours. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Content varies, but involves systematic comparative treatment of such central themes as the transitional society, change and revolution, modernization, political groups, constitutionalism, and bureaucracy. (Sp)

P SC 5603. Russian Politics in Comparative Perspective.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Designed to demonstrate how comparativists who focus on Russia have engaged in seminal works in the subfield of comparative politics. (Irreg.)

P SC 5623. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Is nationalism, in the words of George Orwell, merely "power hunger tempered by self-deception," or does it contribute to the development of a democratic and tolerant citizenry? Why is nationalism associated with authoritarianism and ethnic conflict in the modern age, when the "golden age" of nationalism is linked to the emergence of democracy and self-determination? Did nationalism and the modern state arise simultaneously, or did one produce the other? How do elites seek to mobilize primordial bonds of kinship and loyalty, and what accounts for their success or failure to do so? When do nationalists seek autonomy or secession, and how might they be induced to share power after achieving independence? What motivates violence among ethnic actors and how might it be contained? This course addresses these questions and others in examining major theoretical approaches and thematic issues relevant to understanding nationalism and ethnic politics as modern phenomena. While focused explicitly on political issues, the literature on nationalism and ethnic politics is multidisciplinary and eclectic. Throughout the semester, we will draw on works from history, sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, law, and (of course) political science. (Irreg.)

P SC 5653. Democracies and Democratization.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Examines the historical sources of modern democracy, the causal factors underlying the genesis and survival of democracy, the dynamics of democratic breakdowns and transitions from authoritarian rule, and the problems of democratic regime consolidation and quality. (Irreg.)

P SC 5673. Comparative Political Economy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Examines the organization of economic institutions in different national settings, asking in particular how political systems help shape the economic institutions and outcomes. Specific issues include the organization of economic actors and their influence on economic policy, the impact of technology, and globalization. (Irreg.)

P SC 5683. Politics in Latin America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Covers recent approaches to understanding politics in Latin America, with an emphasis on questions of transitions to democracy and regime stability, the nature of democratic rule, and the role of political institutions, the economy, and the military. (F)

P SC 5713. Classical Political Theory.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3703 or other undergraduate work introducing classical political thought. Open to qualified undergraduate students with permission of instructor. Devoted to study of the political thought developed in classical antiquity, at which time the quest for a systematic and rational understanding of political life emerged and permanently altered the way we think about politics. Emphasis will be given to the works of Plato and Aristotle. (Irreg.)

P SC 5723. Modern Political Theory.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3713 or other undergraduate work introducing modern political thought. Open to qualified undergraduate students with permission of instructor. Devoted to major works in modern political theory, from Machiavelli through Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche in the nineteenth century. Emphasis will be given to those thinkers whose ideas contribute to shaping the major forms of society and government found in the modern state. (Irreg.)

P SC 5803. Emergency Management.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Large scale emergency events (including natural disaster, technological risks, and terrorist attacks) create novel challenges for our political system. This course will review the basic logic of our emergency management policy system along with the basic skills needed to succeed as an emergency manager. (Irreg.)

P SC 5910. Government Internship.2-8 Credit Hours.

2 to 8 hours. Prerequisite: 15 hours of political science or 24 hours of social science. May be repeated; maximum credit eight hours. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 5913. Introduction to Analysis of Political and Administrative Data.3 Credit Hours.

Presents an introduction to the foundations and use of quantitative methods in political science/public administration. Topics covered include: conducting systematic research in political science/public administration, measurement theory, bivariate analysis, hypothesis testing and statistical inference. (F)

P SC 5923. Introduction to Analysis of Political Data.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Introduces elements of research methods and statistical analysis for political science. Students are expected to put these elements into practice by developing and initiating a basic research project. Basic statistics will be introduced as well. Oriented toward development and utilization of quantitative procedures and interpretation of results, rather than to theoretical issues and the mathematical derivation of formulas. Students may not receive credit for both P SC 5913 and P SC 5923. (F)

P SC 5933. Intermediate Analysis of Political Data.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5913; 5000-level prerequisite. Continues the study of the foundations and use of quantitative methods in political science. Topics covered include: probability theory, distribution theory, control table analysis, analysis of variance and correlation and regression analysis. (Sp)

P SC 5940. Advanced Research Methods: Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: 5913 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit six hours. Provides introduction into advanced qualitative or quantitative analytical methods for students who will pursue a career in research. Topics will vary but may include such methodologies as ethnographic, cultural, discriminant, or factor analysis. (Irreg.)

P SC 5950. Research Problems.2-5 Credit Hours.

2 to 5 hours. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit ten hours. Students must indicate field of research and hours credit at the time of enrollment. To be subdivided topically as follows: American national government, public administration, American state and local government, public law, popular government, international relations, comparative government, political theory, elections and political behavior, behavioral laboratory. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 5953. Qualitative Research Methods.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: P SC 5913 or permission of instructor. This course provides graduate-level training in qualitative research methods as preparation for dissertation research. The course begins by orienting students towards research traditions and epistemological issues. It then considers a range of options for designing research and achieving causal inference. The last third of the course covers concrete tools that researchers may deploy while conducting fieldwork. (Irreg.)

P SC 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 5963. Capstone in Public Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. The primary role of government is to address the collective problems, needs, and challenges faced by its citizenry. Government addresses these issues through the development, enactment, and implementation of public policy. This class takes an analytical approach, broadly defined, to studying collective problems and government responses to these problems. The end product of this study will be a research paper. (Sp)

P SC 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

P SC 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

Variable enrollment, two to nine hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, six hours. (F, Sp, Su)

P SC 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

P SC 6003. Political Science: Survey of a Discipline.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: admission to doctoral program in political science. Traces the development of the discipline of political science as well as the epistemological and theoretical foundations of the field. Emphasis is given to the role of research design for political analysis. Attention also is devoted to the professional norms and expectations of an academic career in political science. (Every third semester)

P SC 6023. Field Seminar in American Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Seminar designed to introduce as much of the field of American politics as possible. Includes epistemology and paradigms, institutionalism, the various political institutions that structure our politics, and the role of the individual in American politics. (Irreg.)

P SC 6103. Field Seminar in Public Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Review of the field of public administration. Investigates epistemology and paradigms of the field and considers the role of bureaucratic organizations in the American system of governance. (Irreg.)

P SC 6113. Foundations in Public Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Broad overview of the public administration literature. Historical underpinnings of the subfield and its evolution. Focuses on the frameworks and theories scholars have developed to understand public administration generally. Both theoretical and empirical research are reviewed to examine the "big picture." (Irreg.)

P SC 6133. Foundations in Public Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Gives students a broad overview of the public policy literature. We examine the historical underpinnings of the subfield and familiarize ourselves with its evolution. The course is not substantive in the sense of studying particular policy areas (e.g., environmental, education), but rather focuses on the frameworks and theories scholars have developed to understand the policy process generally. Both theoretical and empirical research are reviewed in an effort to examine the "big picture." (Irreg.)

P SC 6143. Seminar in Public Organization Behavior.3 Credit Hours.

Covers the literature of organization theory which led to the organization behavior movement. Deals with the models or organization behavior in a cultural as well as organizational/governmental framework. (Irreg.)

P SC 6173. Seminar--Public Administration.3 Credit Hours.

Directed research in selected areas of public administration. Commentary and discussion by instructor over general area or areas selected for research. Paper prepared by students and based upon individual research presented to the seminar for analysis and discussion. Example of topic: Decision making in governmental bureaucracy. (Irreg.)

P SC 6223. Field Seminar in Public Policy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A capstone seminar for doctoral students who have substantially completed public policy coursework in preparation of information on completing theories, frameworks, approaches, analytical tools, and guiding principles central to the study of the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of public policy. Attention also will be given to crosscutting topics such as values in the policy process, the role(s) of the policy analyst; ethics; and the utilization and misutilization of the results of social science research. (Irreg.)

P SC 6603. Field Seminar in Comparative Politics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course is an exploration of the central theoretical concepts and problems of comparative politics. (Irreg.)

P SC 6960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Directed readings and/or literature review under the direction of a faculty member. (Irreg.)

P SC 6970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or research and field projects. (Irreg.)

P SC 6980. Research for Doctoral Dissertation.2-16 Credit Hours.

(F, Sp, Su)

P SC 6990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)