PHIL-Philosophy

This is an archived copy of the 2018-2019 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://ou-public.courseleaf.com.

PHIL 1013. Introduction to Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Basic problems of philosophy explored through a consideration of selected philosophers. (F, Sp, Su) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 1103. Critical Reasoning.3 Credit Hours.

An informal survey of evaluative principles of reasoning. The application of these principles is emphasized, and common errors and fallacies in everyday, ethical, legal, and scientific reasoning are discussed. This course is not a course in formal symbolic logic or mathematical logic. (F, Sp) [III-SS] .

PHIL 1113. Introduction to Logic.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: MATH 0123 or satisfactory score on Math placement test. An introduction to modern logic and its applications. Emphasis is placed on deductive logic, but may also include some treatment of inductive logic. Various common fallacies and errors in reasoning will also be discussed. (F, Sp, Su) [I-M] .

PHIL 1203. Philosophy and Human Destiny, East and West.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 1203) An inquiry into values bearing upon human destiny or fulfillment with special attention to values inspired by religion in both western and eastern traditions. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

PHIL 1213. Introduction to Ethics.3 Credit Hours.

Basic issues in moral philosophy examined through a consideration of selected philosophers, including a sampling of normative theories as well as an introduction to issues of metaethics. (F, Sp, some Su) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 1223. Introduction to Asian Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 1223) Survey of the major figures and schools of philosophy in Asia. Includes study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. (F) [IV-NW].

PHIL 1233. Contemporary Moral Issues.3 Credit Hours.

Philosophical exploration of major contemporary moral issues such as euthanasia, abortion, death penalty, war and terrorism, poverty and world hunger, animal rights, pornography, marriage, affirmative action, drug legalization, and organ sales. Students will read contrasting views from prominent philosophers, and learn about how moral theories may be invoked in support of positions on those issues. (F, Sp)[IV-WC].

PHIL 1263. Introduction to Ethics in Health Care.3 Credit Hours.

An overview of important issues in health care ethics, including dilemmas facing providers, patients, researchers, and society at large. The course will introduce facts and concepts drawn from health care practice, and a variety of philosophical approaches used to analyze ethical dilemmas. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

PHIL 1273. Introduction to Business Ethics.3 Credit Hours.

An overview of important issues in business ethics, including the morality of market systems, business-customer relations, employer-employee relations, and firm-shareholder relations. The course will introduce facts and concepts drawn from economic analysis and business practice, as well as a variety of philosophical approaches used to analyze ethical considerations. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

PHIL 1713. Justice in Society.3 Credit Hours.

Introduces students to justice, both as a regulative ideal and as a conscious process of social transformation. Consideration of how to reflect on the society we could have without ignoring past and present transgressions of sexism, racism, ethnic hatred, economic discrimination, religious discrimination, etc. (Irreg.)

PHIL 2900. Special Topics.4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit nine hours. Topics in philosophy not accommodated by the existing curriculum will be taught from time to time (examples: Islamic philosophy, Navajo thought, feminism). (Irreg.)

PHIL 3023. Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of Philosophy or junior standing. Examines historical and contemporary views about the nature, value, social role and interpretation of artworks in a variety of artistic media. The appreciation of nature and of everyday experience is also discussed. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3033. Philosophy and Literature.3 Credit Hours.

Literature expresses in concrete form what philosophy discusses in abstract terms: views of the world that human beings inhabit; views of the nature of human freedom and rationality; and views of the good human life. Use of literature to illustrate philosophical issues, and philosophy to reveal the unstated assumptions and implications of selected literary works. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3243. Civility.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 6 hours of Philosophy or junior standing. Addresses the moral, social, and political aspects of the virtue of civility. Course readings will range from theoretical works linking civility to broad moral and political concerns to more applied approaches that seek to address how civility practices have altered alongside historical, sociological, and technological changes in society. (Irreg.)

PHIL 3253. History of Ethics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy. A survey of the major figures in the history of moral philosophy with emphasis on their interrelations, influences on each other and effect on contemporary moral philosophy. (Sp) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3263. Virtue Ethics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or six hours of Philosophy. An overview of the history of virtue ethics from the ancient Greeks to the present day, covering the historical zenith of virtue ethics through the Middle Ages, the fall of virtue concepts in the early modern period, and the rebirth of virtue ethics in the later 20th century. Discusses a number of executive, moral, intellectual, and civic virtues and their related vices, and addresses some of the fundamental philosophical questions that arise in the study of virtue ethics. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

PHIL 3273. Ethics and Business.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Six hours of philosophy or junior standing. A study of how ethics illuminates business activities. Topics include: the philosophical bases of capitalism; the legitimacy of the profit motive; virtue and the marketplace; corporate responsibility; government regulation; the marketplace and the environment; the ethics of advertising; employee privacy; and the challenges posed by the developing information age. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3293. Environmental Ethics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Surveys the field of environmental ethics. Various principles philosophers use to assign value to the natural world and assign obligations toward nature to human beings are examined by students in order to articulate and defend their own reasoned points of view on environmental questions. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3313. History of Ancient Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy. A survey of Greek and Roman philosophy with concentration on selected readings in classical philosophy from Thales to St. Augustine. (F) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3333. History of Modern Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy. A survey of modern European philosophy with concentration on selected readings from the Renaissance through Kant. (Sp) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3343. Chinese Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 3343) Prerequisite: Six hours of philosophy or junior standing. Survey and analysis of the major texts and schools of philosophy in China, from the ancient world to the contemporary era. (Irreg.) [IV-NW].

PHIL 3353. American Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

A study of important American philosophers and philosophical movements, from Jonathan Edwards through pragmatism. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3363. Comparative Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with IAS 3363) Prerequisite: Six hours of philosophy or junior standing. A study of topics of significant philosophical interest that includes study and analysis of both western and non-western philosophical sources. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

PHIL 3393. History of Analytic Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. This course, open to non-majors, explores some of the main methods and topics of interest in the analytic philosophical tradition. We will examine the views of influential philosophers, starting around the beginning of the twentieth century, on questions such as: What is the world made up of? What is the nature of time? What is knowledge, and do we have any? What is the relationship between thought and language, and which comes first? How is the mind related to the body? Can computers think? And just how should philosophers approach such questions? (Irreg.) [WC].

PHIL 3423. Ancient and Medieval Religious Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. Covers the history of religious philosophy in the West from ancient Greece until the 16th century. Major figures studied include Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, Plotinus, Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Maimonides, Aquinas, Averroes, Scotus, Ockham, and the Reformers. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3433. Modern Philosophy of Religion.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. Covers the history of modern religious philosophy in the West from the 17th to the mid-20th centuries. Major figures studied include Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, Locke, Hume, Kant, Kierkkegaard, Nietzsche, Clifford, James, Freud, and Wittgenstein. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 3443. Contemporary Issues in Philosophy of Religion.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. Issues currently debated in philosophy of religion. Topics include the rationality of religious belief, the problem of evil, the dilemma of divine foreknowledge and human free will, life after death, the relation between science and religion, and religion and public policy. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3503. Self and Identity.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 1013 or permission of instructor. Introduction to a number of philosophical topics about the self including personal identity, immortality, unity of self-consciousness, self-knowledge, and nature of self. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3533. Language, Communication, and Knowledge.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. The nature of language and communication as studied by linguists and philosophers. Topics will include the nature of meanings; the relationship between syntax, semantics, and pragmatics; and the transmission of knowledge through testimony. Combines philosophical readings with readings from the empirical sciences. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3613. Philosophy of Biology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. Philosophical issues raised by evolutionary theory. Topics include creationism versus evolutionary theory; what makes a hypothesis scientific; can evolutionary theory explain psychological or cultural phenomena? (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3623. Philosophical Issues in Physics and Cosmology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. Focus on philosophical issues raised by relativity theory (e.g. the nature of space and time), quantum theory (e.g. non-local action, the measurement problem), and cosmology (e.g. how did the universe begin, will it end and how, and what sense can be made of the universe beginning and ending?). (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3633. The Nature of Science.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of Philosophy or junior standing. Issues related to the nature and scope of science. Topics may include distinguishing science form pseudo-science; the nature of scientific theories; the history of scientific progress; and the theory-ladenness of observation. Also, brief comparisons of different special sciences may be made in order to investigate what they have in common and what is special to each. (Irreg.)

PHIL 3713. History of Social and Political Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. A survey of the views of major philosophers from Plato to the nineteenth century on the nature of man's relation to society and to the state in the context of their wider philosophical (logical, epistemological, metaphysical and ethical) doctrines. Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel and Marx are the chief figures covered, though others will be considered as time permits. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3723. Contemporary Social and Political Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Six hours of philosophy or junior standing. A study of contemporary discussions of political legitimacy, political obligation, democracy, theories of justice and desert, and accounts of individual and group rights. Topics include issues such as political liberalism and its contemporary critiques, discourse-based political theory, theories of procedural and deliberative democracy, and cultural pluralism. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

PHIL 3733. Religion in Political Theory.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of Philosophy or junior standing. Survey of views on religion in political life held by important political theorists in the modern western tradition and consider how theoretical positions on the role of religion in political life are reflected in political institutions, such as the first amendment establishment clause. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3743. Feminist Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Six hours of philosophy or junior standing. A study of the major schools of feminist philosophy, as well as issues of perennial and contemporary interest in feminist philosophy. (Irreg.) [IV-WC] .

PHIL 3753. Philosophy of Race.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or six hours of philosophy. Addresses philosophical questions about race. Social justice will be an important focus of the course. Additional specific issues related to race and racism will also be addressed; hopefully, a better understanding of the philosophical issues and a commitment to the eradication of racism and racial injustice will be reached. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

PHIL 3763. Law and Society.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy or junior standing. An introduction to the history and structure of the main controversies in modern law, with special attention to the United States legal system. Covered topics include natural law, legal realism, the law and economics movement, theories of responsibility and liability, feminist legal theory, and theories of text interpretation. (Irreg.) [IV-WC].

PHIL 3803. Topics in Philosophy for Majors.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 6 hours of Philosophy and declared Philosophy major. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 6 hours. This is the majors-only version of a 3000-level course designated by the Philosophy Department to serve as a "target class" for PHIL 3811, the Writing Workshop in Philosophy. It meets concurrently with that designated course. Content will vary depending on the designated course, but will include intensified writing requirements. (F, Sp)

PHIL 3811. Philosophy Writing Workshop.1 Credit Hour.

Prerequisite: co-requisite with 3813, 3833 or 3853. Intensive instruction on how to write papers in philosophy. Students will use the workshop to help them write the term paper for a designated target class, in which they must be concurrently enrolled. (F, Sp)

PHIL 3813. History of Ancient Philosophy for Majors.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy and Philosophy or Ethics and Religion major. A survey of Greek and Roman philosophy with concentration on selected readings in classical philosophy from Thales to St. Augustine. For majors in Philosophy or Ethics and Religion. No student may earn credit for both 3313 and 3813. (F, Sp)

PHIL 3833. History of Modern Philosophy for Majors.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy and Philosophy or Ethics and Religion major. A survey of modern European philosophy with concentration on selected readings from the Renaissance through Kant. For majors in Philosophy or Ethics and Religion. No student may earn credit for both 3333 and 3833. (F, Sp)

PHIL 3843. Chinese Philosophy for Majors.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of Philosophy and declared Philosophy major. Survey and analysis of the major texts and schools of philosophy in China, from the ancient world to the contemporary era. This is the majors-only version of PHIL 3343, Chinese Philosophy; it meets concurrently with that course, but has intensified writing requirements. It can serve as a "target class" for PHIL 3811, the Writing Workshop in Philosophy. (Irreg.)

PHIL 3853. History of Ethics for Majors.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: six hours of philosophy and Philosophy or Ethics and Religion major. A survey of the major figures in the history of moral philosophy with emphasis on their interrelations, influences on each other and effect on contemporary moral philosophy. For majors in Philosophy or Ethics and Religion. No student may earn credit for both 3253 and 3853. (Sp)

PHIL 3900. Special Topics.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. May be repeated with change of topic, maximum credit nine hours. Topics in philosophy not accommodated by the existing curriculum will be taught from time to time. (Irreg.)

PHIL 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will consist of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. Topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. The projects covered will vary. The content will deal with concepts not usually presented in regular coursework. (Irreg.)

PHIL 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: one course in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 4023. Survey of Analytic Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with PHIL 5023) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy or permission of department. Survey of major philosophical topics in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. Topics include the ontology of art, interpretation, the value of artworks, the relationship between aesthetic and moral value, and aesthetic experience in everyday life. No student may earn credit for both 4023 and 5023. (Irreg.)

PHIL G4133. Symbolic Logic I.3 Credit Hours.

An introduction to the symbolism and methods of modern deductive logic. (F)

PHIL 4293. Ethical Theory.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5293) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy including an ethics course or permission. A survey of theories of the nature and foundations of morality. Topics may include the analysis of moral language, the justification of moral beliefs, and the status of ethical theories. No student may earn credit for both 4293 and 5293. (Sp)

PHIL 4343. Early Chinese Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5343, Crosslisted with IAS 4343) Prerequisite: eight hours of Philosophy or permission. Survey of pre-Qin Chinese philosophy, including the major texts and figures of Confucianism, Daoism, and other notable schools. No student may earn credit for both 4343 and 5343. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4473. Philosophy of Religion.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5473) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey of topics in the philosophy of religion. Topics covered include the concept of God, the problem of religious knowledge, the nature of religious language, the problem of evil, and particular thinkers. No student may earn credit for both 4473 and 5473. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4513. Metaphysics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5513) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey of major philosophical views about the nature of reality. Topics covered may included the mind-body problem, causation, personal identity, free will and determinism, universals, and the existence of God. No student may earn credit for both 4513 and 5513. (Sp)

PHIL 4523. Epistemology.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5523) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey on the evaluation of human reasoning and the nature and scope of human knowledge. Topics include skepticism, the nature of justification, the ethics of belief, and the problem of induction. No student may earn credit for both 4523 and 5523. (F)

PHIL 4533. Philosophy of Language.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with PHIL 5533) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey of major philosophical views on the nature and workings of language. Topics covered include: meaning and truth, sense and reference, speech acts, and communication. No student may earn credit for both 4533 and 5533. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4543. Philosophy of Mind.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with PHIL 5543) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey of major philosophical views on the nature of the mind. Topics covered may include: the nature and unity of consciousness, the mind-body problem, personal identity, the emotions, actions and intentions, self-knowledge, and other minds. No student may earn credit for both 4543 and 5543. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4613. Philosophy of Science.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5613) Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey of main issues in the philosophy of science. Topics will include the structure of scientific theories, theory testing, and the rationale of scientific methodologies. The rationality of scientific belief and the moral constraints on scientific research may also be discussed. No student may earn credit for both 4613 and 5613. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4623. Philosophy of The Social Sciences.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5623) Prerequisite: nine hours of upper-division social sciences or permission. Survey of issues in the philosophy of the social sciences. Topics covered will include explanation in the social sciences, theory construction, theories and observation, evidence and theory of confirmation, theoretical constructs and operationism, verstehen and objectivity. No student may earn credit for both 4623 and 5623. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4713. Survey of Social and Political Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 5713) Prerequisite: Eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey of important theories in social and political philosophy. Beginning with ancient theories (Plato and Aristotle), to modern social contract theories and the foundations of liberalism (Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill), and concludes with the debate between liberals and communitarians (Rawls and his critics). No student may earn credit for both 4713 and 5713. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4893. Senior Capstone in Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduating majors. Covering the major areas of philosophy taught in the undergraduate major, coordinated with the departmental objectives for undergraduate majors and for the purpose of assessing the level of learning among graduating seniors. (Sp) [V] .

PHIL 4900. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: eight hours of philosophy. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit nine hours. Topics in philosophy not accommodated by the existing curriculum. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PHIL 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: three courses in general area to be studied; permission of instructor and department. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 5023. Survey of Analytic Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with PHIL 4023) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of major philosophical topics in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. Topics include the ontology of art, interpretation, the value of artworks, the relationship between aesthetic and moral value, and aesthetic experience in everyday life. No student may earn credit for both 4023 and 5023. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5143. Symbolic Logic II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. Further study of first order predicate logic: identity, axiomatic development. Various metatheorems; soundness, consistency and completeness. (Alt. Sp)

PHIL 5293. Ethical Theory.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4293) Prerequisite: graduate standing. A survey of theories of the nature and foundations of morality. Topics may include the analysis of moral language, the justification of moral beliefs, and the status of ethical theories. No student may earn credit for both 4293 and 5293. (Sp)

PHIL 5313. Studies in Ancient Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 3313. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 18 hours. Survey of philosophical writings of a major ancient Greek philosopher, typically Plato and Aristotle. Works covering different philosophical topics and written at different stages in the philosopher's development will be studied. Selection of figure will alternate each year the course is offered. (Sp)

PHIL 5333. Studies in Modern Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 18 hours. Survey of philosophical writings of major philosophers. Figures covered will alternate each year between the Rationalists (Descartes, Leibniz, and Spinoza) and the Empiricists (Locke, Berkeley, and Hume), though other combinations (e.g., Locke and Leibniz) may be offered. (F)

PHIL 5343. Early Chinese Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4343, Crosslisted with IAS 5343) Prerequisite: eight hours of Philosophy or permission. Survey of pre-Qin Chinese philosophy, including the major texts and figures of Confucianism, Daoism, and other notable schools. No student may earn credit for both 4343 and 5343. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5473. Philosophy of Religion.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4473) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of topics in the philosophy of religion. Topics covered include the concept of God, the problem of religious knowledge, the nature of religious language, the problem of evil, and particular thinkers. No student may earn credit for both 4473 and 5473. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5513. Metaphysics.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4513) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of major philosophical views about the nature of reality. Topics covered may included the mind-body problem, causation, personal identity, free will and determinism, universals, and the existence of God. No student may earn credit for both 4513 and 5513. (Sp)

PHIL 5523. Epistemology.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4523) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey on the evaluation of human reasoning and the nature and scope of human knowledge. Topics include skepticism, the nature of justification, the ethics of belief, and the problem of induction. No student may earn credit for both 4523 and 5523. (F)

PHIL 5533. Philosophy of Language.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with PHIL 4533) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of major philosophical views on the nature and workings of language. Topics covered include: meaning and truth, sense and reference, speech acts, and communication. No student may earn credit for both 4533 and 5533. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5543. Philosophy of Mind.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with PHIL 4543) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of major philosophical views on the nature of the mind. Topics covered may include the nature and unity of consciousness, the mind-body problem, personal identity, the emotions, actions and intentions, self-knowledge, and other minds. No student may earn credit for both 4543 and 5543. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5613. Philosophy of Science.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4613) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of main issues in the philosophy of science. Topics will include the structure of scientific theories, theory testing, and the rationale of scientific methodologies. The rationality of scientific belief and the moral constraints of scientific research may also be discussed. No student may earn credit for both 4613 and 5613. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5623. Philosophy of The Social Sciences.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4623) Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of issues in the philosophy of the social sciences. Topics covered will include explanation in the social sciences, theory construction, theories and observation, evidence and theory of confirmation, theoretical constructs and operationism, verstehen and objectivity. No student may earn credit for both 4623 and 5623. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5713. Survey of Social and Political Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

(Slashlisted with 4713) Prerequisite: Eight hours of philosophy or permission. Survey of important theories in social and political philosophy. Beginning with ancient theories (Plato and Aristotle), to modern social contract theories and the foundations of liberalism (Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Mill), and concludes with the debate between liberals and communitarians (Rawls and his critics). No student may earn credit for both 4713 and 5713. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5833. Gender, Values, and Education.3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with EDS 5833) Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit six hours. Topics vary each semester, but are developed from philosophical studies in and about education, politics, ethics, aesthetics, law and religion that address the issues of gender and sexuality. Intensive oral and written theoretical inquiry. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated with change of topic; maximum credit nine hours. Topics in philosophy not accommodated by the existing curriculum. (Irreg.)

PHIL 5980. Research for Master's Thesis.2-9 Credit Hours.

Variable enrollment, two to nine hours; maximum credit applicable toward degree, four hours. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and adviser. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum undergraduate credit eight hours; maximum graduate credit 12 hours. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 6010. Writing Educational Inquiry.1-3 Credit Hours.

(Crosslisted with EDS 6010) 1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing, enrollment in any graduate EDFN or philosophy course, and permission based on review of academic writing samples. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Individual or group tutorial study of informal logic and rhetorical theory concerning academic writing as a social practice. Emphasis on contextually appropriate documentation practices, philosophical moves, and rhetorical devices; development of clarity and grace in written formulations of educational concepts and values. Address various scholarly and professional situations. Aimed toward public presentation or publication. (F, Sp)

PHIL 6023. Seminar in Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: graduate standing. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive seminar on a topic in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6173. Seminar in Logic.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 4133 or permission. May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit 12 hours. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6203. Seminar in Ethics.3 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit 12 hours. (F, Sp)

PHIL 6383. Seminar in Chinese Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite; graduate standing. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive seminar on a topic in Chinese philosophy. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6393. Seminar in the History of Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit 12 hours. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6473. Seminar In Philosophy Of Religion.3 Credit Hours.

Seminar In Philosophy Of Religion. Prerequisite: 5473 Or Permission. May Be Repeated With Change Of Content; Maximum Credit 12 Hours. Intensive Seminar On A Topic In The Philosophy Of Religion. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6513. Seminar in Metaphysics.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5513 or permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive seminar on a topic in metaphysics. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6523. Seminar in Epistemology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5523 or permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive seminar on a topic in epistemology. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6533. Seminar in Philosophy of Language.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5533 or permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive seminar on a topic in the philosophy of language. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6593. Seminar in Contemporary Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

May be repeated with change of subject matter; maximum credit 12 hours. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6613. Seminar in Philosophy of Science.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5613 or permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive seminar on a topic in the philosophy of science. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6793. Seminar in Social and Political Philosophy.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 5763 or permission. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit 12 hours. Intensive seminar on a topic in the philosophy of law. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Directed readings and/or literature review under the direction of a faculty member. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or research and field projects. (Irreg.)

PHIL 6980. Research for Doctoral Dissertation.2-16 Credit Hours.

Research for doctoral dissertation. (F, Sp, Su)

PHIL 6990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Contracted independent study for a topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. Independent study may include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)