LTRS-Letters

This is an archived copy of the 2018-2019 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://ou-public.courseleaf.com.

LTRS 1113. Introduction to Letters.3 Credit Hours.

Introduction to Letters major, OU's interdisciplinary humanities degree which provides a traditional liberal arts education. Modeled around a "Great-Books" approach that there is a canon of texts that has transcendent value because certain works are able to speak to the human condition across time and space. The curriculum is distinct through its insistence on combining history, philosophy, and literature as ways of asking the same fundamental questions through the record of actual human experience. A sequence of topics address perennial human concerns: reason and passion, love, death, work, God, freedom, time, and so on. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 2103. Introduction to Constitutional Studies.3 Credit Hours.

Provides a broad introduction to the theory and history of constitutional governance. Includes the classical roots of constitutional thought, the contribution of the English common law tradition, the origins and structure of the U.S. Constitution, along with a sense of the constitutional basis of contemporary political controversies. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 2970. Special Topics.1-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: none. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Special topics course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LTRS 3023. Classical Italy and Umbria.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: 45 hours and permission of instructor; priority enrollment will be given to those students participating in the Perugia program. An introductory survey of the evolution of Italy from the pre-Roman Italic and non-Italic peoples and civilizations through the Roman era, papal rule, the Renaissance, Spanish and French domination, and ultimate unification into a modern country. Because of the tremendous influence of ancient Rome on Italy, more time will be spent on the Roman era than any other. Course consists of internet research on selected and chronological topics followed by essays and class discussion using internet technologies. (Su) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3113. The Examined Life I: Antiquity.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of Greece and Rome, with emphasis on understanding the impact of classical texts on modern day thought. Can be applied to the Letters major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3123. The Examined Life II: Middle Ages and Renaissance.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, with emphasis on the impact of these texts on modern thought. Can be applied toward the Letters major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (Sp) IV-WC].

LTRS 3133. Examined Life III: Enlightnmnt.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of the great books of The Enlightenment, with emphasis on understanding the impact of these texts on modern thought. Can be applied toward the Letters Major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3143. Examined Life IV: Modern Acad.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor. Survey of 19th and 20th century thought, with emphasis on intellectual movements that have influenced the development of modern higher education. Can be applied toward the Letters major's requirement in history, literature, or philosophy. (Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3203. Revenge Tragedy, Ancient and Modern.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Focuses on the revenge tragedy, a genre of entertainment that has enjoyed widespread popularity from its inception in Classical Antiquity up to the present day in commercial film. Investigates the origins of the revenge tragedy in Seneca's Medea, Thomas Kyd's Spanish Tragedy, and Shakespeare's Hamlet, and explores the ways that modern horror, action, and mobster films adopt and adapt conventions from these seminal works. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3213. Shakespeare and Classical Mythology.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Classical myth constitutes the single most important body of material that Shakespeare drew on in constructing his plays and poetry, and this course examines its significance to Shakespeare's writing. Whether used for comic, ironic, or tragic effect, Shakespeare's many allusions to Classical myth introduce us to words, images, and moral and aesthetic questions that significantly widen our perspective on his work. (F, Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3303. Origins of Rights in Early America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Explores the historical, rather than the philosophical, origins of ideas of individual and group rights in the European settlement of the New World. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3313. Secret Societies in American Culture.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Examines secret societies in American history, from the Revolution through the twentieth century, including the Freemasons, Odd Fellows, Ku Klux Klan, and collegiate secret societies that could claim the membership of millions. (F)

LTRS 3353. Interpreting the American Founding.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: ENGL 1213 or EXPO 1213. Examines the various ways that scholars have interpreted the Founding over the past two hundred years. It is a study, then, of the historiographic interpretations of the events of the American Founding era rather than a study of the events and historical figures themselves. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3440. Mentored Research Experience.3 Credit Hours.

0 to 3 hours. Prerequisites: ENGL 1113 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit 12 hours. For the inquisitive student to apply the scholarly processes of the discipline to a research or creative project under the mentorship of a faculty member. Student and instructor should complete an Undergraduate Research & Creative Projects (URCP) Mentoring Agreement and file it with the URCP office. Not for honors credit. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 3510. Topics in Letters.2-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit nine hours. Discussion of selected interdisciplinary topics in letters. (Irreg.)

LTRS 3603. Debating Constitutional Controversies.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. This course transforms the classroom into a courtroom. Students become lawyers and judges, arguing and deciding cases that hinge on our most important Constitutional controversies. Working in teams, students grapple with these contentious issues in the context of the Constitution, the common law, and legal theory. (F, Sp)

LTRS 3703. Law and Social Movements.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines the history of the interaction between the law and social movements in the United States from the Civil War to the present day. Topics include the struggles for racial and gender equality and the histories of immigrant and gay rights movements. (F, Sp)

LTRS 3713. Gender and the Constitution.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines how ideas about gender, sexuality, and the family have shaped the privileges and obligations of American citizenship. Topics covered in this class include feminism, masculinity, women's suffrage, interracial marriage, affirmative action, and sexual orientation. In addition, it will examine how women have shaped the law as plaintiffs, lawyers, and judges. (F, Sp)

LTRS 3803. Fate & The Individual in European Literature I.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Based on a course designed by W.H. Auden, this is part one of an intensive examination of classic texts of western literature, exploring questions of freedom, fate, and human responsibility. Texts introduce students to an ongoing conversation about what it means to be human. Begins in ancient Greece and ends in the seventeenth century. (F) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3813. Fate & The Individual in European Literature II.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English 1213 or Expository Writing 1213. Based on a course designed by W.H. Auden, this is part two of an intensive examination of classic texts of western literature, exploring questions of freedom, fate, and human responsibility. Texts introduce students to an ongoing conversation about what it means to be human. Texts cover the early modern period to the twentieth century. (Sp) [IV-WC].

LTRS 3960. Honors Reading.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Consists of topics designated by the instructor in keeping with the student's major program. The topics will cover materials not usually presented in the regular courses. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 3970. Honors Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Subjects covered vary. Deals with concepts not usually treated in regular courses. (Irreg.)

LTRS 3980. Honors Research.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Will provide an opportunity for the gifted Honors candidate to work at a special project in the student's field. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 3990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and junior standing. May be repeated once with change of content. Independent study may be arranged to study a subject not available through regular course offerings. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 4103. Atlantic Revolutionaries.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines the ideas of revolution, citizenship, and freedom in the Atlantic World in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Students will examine revolutionary leaders including Simon Bolivar and Toussant L'Overture, and how ordinary people claimed for themselves ideas of equality and liberty in the Age of Revolution. (F, Sp)

LTRS 4303. Tocqueville's America.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: English/Expository Writing 1213. Examines the nation that Frenchmen Alexis de Tocqueville and Gustave de Beaumont encountered when they came to the United States--its society, literature, politics, and culture. Explores, in depth, the two towering literary productions of their expedition into America: Tocqueville's Democracy in America and Beaumont's groundbreaking antislavery novel, Marie. (F, Sp)

LTRS 4503. Letters Capstone Course.3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: senior standing in major. May be repeated with change of content; maximum credit six hours. Students will write a senior paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Papers will demonstrate students' abilities to synthesize material drawn from among two or more of the areas included in the Letters program. (F, Sp) [V].

LTRS 4960. Directed Readings.1-4 Credit Hours.

1 to 4 hours. Prerequisite: good standing in University; permission of instructor and dean. May be repeated; maximum credit four hours. Designed for upper-division students who need opportunity to study a specific problem in greater depth than formal course content permits. (Irreg.)

LTRS 4970. Special Topics/Seminar.2-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LTRS 4990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

Prerequisite: junior standing or permission of instructor or department. May be repeated; Maximum credit six hours. Contracted independent study for topic not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. (F, Sp)

LTRS 5960. Directed Readings.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of department. May be repeated; maximum credit twelve hours. Directed readings and/or literature reviews under the direction of a faculty member. (F, Sp, Su)

LTRS 5970. Special Topics/Seminar.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit nine hours. Special topics or seminar course for content not currently offered in regularly scheduled courses. May include library and/or laboratory research and field projects. (Irreg.)

LTRS 5990. Independent Study.1-3 Credit Hours.

1 to 3 hours. Prerequisite: graduate standing and permission of instructor. May be repeated; maximum credit six hours. Reading and research arranged and directed in consultation with the instructor, in specified areas of classical civilization and culture. (F, Sp, Su)