Meteorology Doctoral Programs

This is an archived copy of the 2018-2019 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://ou-public.courseleaf.com.

Doctor of Philosophy

Students seeking the degree of Doctor of Philosophy through the School of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma (hereafter referred to as candidate) must satisfy all general requirements set forth by the Graduate College as well as all particular requirements set forth by the School of Meteorology. The principal requirements of both are listed below.

  • Total number of graduate credit hours required: 90 (Up to 44 credit hours may be approved for transfer from a master’s degree).
  • Required coursework: 1 hour of METR 6970 (may be repeated for up to 4 credit hours).
  • Exams:
    1. The School of Meteorology’s General Exam.
    2. Dissertation defense.

Ph.D. General Examination

As stipulated by the Graduate College, passing a ''General Examination'' consisting of a written and oral portion is a degree requirement for receiving a Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma. The Graduate College defines many procedures about the General Examination, which the student and the student's Doctoral Committee should recognize and heed. This document codifies additional School of Meteorology (the ''academic unit'') rules pertaining to the ''General Examination for a Ph.D. in Meteorology.'' The Graduate College states: "The General Examination consists of a written and oral portion. It is intended to test the student’s mastery of a number of related fields as well as the student’s capacity for synthesis, sound generalization and critical ability.”

To this end, the following is required: The student's Doctoral Committee will define a task of critical review and analysis of a topic in meteorology. The task may be relevant to the student's specialty within meteorology, but should not be about material that is planned to be directly incorporated into the student's Dissertation. More details about the General Exam can be found in the Meteorology Graduate Student Handbook.